still life vs portrait for beginners

still life vs portrait for beginners

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still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby karenmok » Thu May 08, 2014 4:23 pm

Hi,
DD wants to paint portraits but the art teacher says that she should do still life for at least 6 months.
Also teacher says that DD should do pencil drawing for at least 6 months.
Should I look for another art teacher or should I convince DD to obey the existing teacher?
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby rachels1982 » Thu Jan 29, 2015 12:21 pm

I believe teacher has her reasons. Maybe you should ask the tchr?

There really isnt a fixed way to learn art though. If she wants to do portraits, she should go for it!
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby cyberette » Thu Feb 05, 2015 3:56 pm

Hi karenmok

I'm sure there is a good reason why the teacher recommended doing the above genres in that order.

In still life, you place a couple of objects of different geometric shapes, sizes and textures side by side, one in front of the other. In this manner, student can acquire basic techniques of sketching shiny surfaces (apples), matte surfaces (plums, ceramics), rough textures (oranges, wooden objects), intricate surfaces (rambutans, pineapples, durians, wicker baskets), high-gloss surfaces (wine bottles, enamel plates, mirrors, tins and cans), round objects (apples), triangular shapes (pears), oval shapes (papayas and mangoes), straight lines (boxes or sides of bottles), curves (neck of bottles, bananas, jugs, teapots), fabrics (table cloths, terry towels, silk), etc.

More importantly, with these still objects, students can take their own time to master depth of field (objects behind are darker in shade), inter-relationship between shadows of various objects (especially how shadows are distorted/reflected on metallic and glass surfaces of the adjacent object) as well as observing the direction of lighting cast onto table.

When these broad strokes are mastered, they will usually move on to detailed drawing of insects, leaves and flowers. By which time, the student should have learnt how to apply the appropriate pressure on his strokes. A harsh stroke will render the dragonfly's wings or orchid petals unreal. A weak hand will also make the tulip appear wilting. An inattentive eye will overlook the thorns on the rose stem.

Human portraits usually come later because the student needs to be able to confidently and swiftly sketch out the rough outlines of the model within no more than 30 min before adding in the shadows and details. Typically, it should be completed within 3 hours so as not to tire out the model sitting in that same position.

Compared to still life, scope of texture of portraits is narrower - skin complexion (dependent on race and age of model - deep wrinkles, baby-smooth, weather-beaten), hair/beard/moustache/stubble, softness of the lips (with or without lipstick), and fabrics (perhaps only up to collar/shoulder level). Getting the human face to look proportionate requires practice, but after doing 6 months of still life (grasping the inter-relationship between large and small objects of diff shapes and textures placed at varying levels and heights), the student should know where to position the brows, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, etc. at the correct level.

The most difficult would be the eyes. The "twinkle"/pupil in the eyes is not easy to capture. Once you capture "the look" wrongly, the model's eyes will appear glassy and image won't resemble him/her nor capture the mood/expression of the model. Btw, having learnt how to draw high-gloss objects in still life will enable student to draw the spectacles worn by the model quite realistically too.

The above is only pencil/charcoal sketching. Once you move on to another medium, i.e. water-colour, of still life and portrait, it's a diff ball game again.
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby phtthp » Thu Feb 05, 2015 5:51 pm

Where to learn still life or portrait, for P3 children ?
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby muskmelon » Mon Apr 13, 2015 10:32 pm

phtthp wrote:Where to learn still life or portrait, for P3 children ?


Image

Check out http://www.sykconcept.com.
There are various relevant courses!
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby momkiasu » Tue Jun 09, 2015 11:39 am

I would suggest looking at what your child’s preference is and assess by which one she is better at, although , maybe the teacher is trying to broaden her perspective on art.

My suggestion is to let your child try out both.

Good luck!
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby iceicebaby_ » Wed Feb 17, 2016 6:12 pm

If anyone has kids that are interested in art/drawing, start with still life so your child can practice the shading and geometric shapes. Then when your child wants to draw faces get them to start drawing their own faces using a mirror or from a picture. This is very good for them to practice since the 'model' is themselves and they can take their time and do whatever they want. This also helps the child get hold of the proportions of the features on a face and some abstract shapes. :rahrah: :rahrah:

No matter medium he/she likes to use, paint, pencil, paper(collage), crayon, pen, leaves or even food. Know that this is your childs creativity growing and exploration. He or she might even be the next picasso. :celebrate:

Then after their own faces, draw peoples faces like their favorite celebrities or even family and friends from pictures. I think its better not to have a live model because the kids get stressed because of time and most dont like showing their masterpiece to other people.

My kid loved to draw and sketch things, found out all these good tips from personal experience. I think this is great for jump starting a hobby or maybe a talent in your kid. All these will come in handy if he/she does art in the future. Remember to always give your kids confidence in their artworks, sometimes it may look weird but it has a special meaning to your kid. Also dont limit he/she to only draw specific things, let them draw what they want. If they are really interested they would continue to explore themselves. You can always guide them. Always support them is the right way to go :smile:
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Re: still life vs portrait for beginners

Postby ilovelaksa » Wed Feb 17, 2016 7:02 pm

phtthp wrote:Where to learn still life or portrait, for P3 children ?

Hallo, my children take lessons from Rus Art.
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