Art Can Unfold Young Children’s Creativeness

Art engages young children’s senses and unfold the creativity in them. When a child paints a picture, it is not just a fun activity for him or her. It involves the motor skills and cognitive development of the child. It is both a multi-sensory experience and an intellectual process. For example, when a child draws a firefighter who is engaged in fighting fire with a water hose, it involves going through his or her mental processes the motions of carrying out the firefighting task. Some form of strategic planning and thinking skills are needed in the above activity.

A child unfolds his creative potential through art. Research studies indicated that art activities enhance a child’s intellect and creativeness and these benefits will surface later in life. Unfortunately, this creativeness during early childhood is often overlooked in an education system that places much emphasis in the academic subjects and formal assessment. Teachers and parents anxiously prepare young children to master the 3Rs (Read, wRite and numeRacy) which are necessary skills for a smooth transition to Primary one.

The late Dr Viktor Lowenfeld (1965 cited in Britain 1985), a research professor in art education, once cited a conversation he had with the Director of Art in Moscow city, Russia. The art director mentioned that in their country, it placed a lot of emphasis in unfolding creativeness in young Russian children through art. However, when these children arrived at high school level, the school system was regimented according to Russian doctrines for economic reasons. ‘Children to us are sacred…We would like to bring out everything that is in them, and we have realized that art is a very important subject in the elementary classroom…Once creativeness is unfolded, we have to channel it, we have to discipline it, whether it is in the Sciences or in the arts. For us, nothing is useful that is not useful to the country.’ said the Director of Art (p.9). It could be one of the reasons why the Soviet Union is so successful in grooming great scientists and in its scientific endeavours.

Creativity unfolded in the early formative years of children will certainly surfaced down the road. We need to unfold this creativeness in young children so as to nurture creative and thinking citizens in future. Perhaps, a curriculum reform in the early years is the way to go.

(The above article is adapted from the speeches by the late Dr Viktor Lowenfeld, transcribed from tape recordings by Britain W. L 1985, Viktor Lowenfeld Speaks on Art and Creativity, National Art Education Association, VA.)

Art instead of academic enrichment

I have just signed up my son for lessons at Arts Kids (Tiong Banru branch) after reading the reviews of some parents in one of the discussion thread. Just to share that my son is not attending any other enrichment class. In fact, he has never attended any academic enrichemnt.

I do not think he is particularly talented in drawing (prob becos he’s not born with the genes haha) but I do hope to give him some exposure and basic foundation. I believe not many parents will do the same ie let their child attend art class instead of academic class. i do not know if this is the right thing or best thing to do, as only time will tell. But I hope more parents will think about exposing their kids to such classes, and letting them enjoy learning. Not saying that academic classes are all boring, but they will be spending so many years studying. Why not let them have some fun before all the stress starts?

My son likes drawing

My son likes drawing too…. after he turned 5, I see him drawing all the time and doesn’t do all the naughty things he used to do before. Until 4+ he used to drive us mad openings the fridge, opening the water taps, turning washing machine.

Can parents suggest any books or links which will help me guide him. Iam not keen on putting him in art class either, not b’coz of the cost but thought I can teach myself at home for some more time.

 

 

My ds likes drawing too,

My ds likes drawing too, and can spend hours on the paper.  Apart from sending him to art classes, wat are some other alternatives?

My daughter loves drawing

My daughter loves drawing too. I never wonder about where it will lead her to. As long as she finds it engaging and is a good and safe outlet for her feelings, I am all for it.

Art can unfold young children's creativity

I’ve always wondered if I am on the right track with my son, who loves to draw. He isn’t attending any art lessons as my husband doesn’t think there is a need to. “Just let him draw!” He’d say. So my son continues to draw. Whether it’s on small bits of paper or on a large sheet – he’ll fill the entire page. I am thinking of putting up a blog for him just to keep a record of all his ‘works’ in case I loose them. I always ask myself – Where will all these drawing lead him to become one day? This article certainly gives me some hope and encouragement! Thanks for sharing!

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