Children’s Aspiration: How much do parents know? + Get NTUC voucher for survey

 

“If you can dream it, you can do it.”
― Walt Disney Company

:: What are your children’s dreams and aspirations? Sign up for a research survey and receive a $10 NTUC voucher.

Many people would point to Mickey Mouse as the catalyst for Walt Disney Company’s success. Created in the late 1920s, Mickey soon became the world’s most popular cartoon character.

However, it would probably be more fitting to argue that Walt Disney and his company’s seeds of success were sowed long before that. His aspiration to become an entertainer who would bring joy and laughter to be public must have sparked during his childhood, judging from his early interest in drawing, even taking evening classes to improve his drawing skills. In his teenage years, he was already performing and acting. And even before Walt Disney Company, he had started a company called Laugh-O-Grams.

And Walt Disney fulfilled his dream.

Aspiration is often associated with a whimsical sense of dreaming about the future. Just like Walt Disney in the early 1900s, the children of today would definitely benefit if they spend some time pondering over the question “When I grow up, I want to be a…”

After all, without an aspiration for the future, how can they possibly come up with a plan to reach towards that goal, not to mention fulfil it?

Studies have been done around the world trying to figure out what our next generation is thinking. For example, a poll done in United Kingdom found an increasing trend in children aspiring to take on glamorous jobs like footballers or models. On the other hand, traditional jobs like teacher and policeman have disappeared from the Top 10 jobs list.

What are the factors that have given rise to this trend? What kind of expectations do you have in your child?

Certainly, parents play an important role in guiding our children to develop their fullest potential and thus fulfil their dreams.

Concerned parents like you are always learning how to engage and motivate your child, be it from books, workshops or television programs. These valuable guides and tips are often the result of years of research done in a bid to improve understanding of our children and better our parenting skills.

Here’s a chance for you, as a parent, to help researchers learn more about our next generation and also parents’ expectations of them.

Q Research Consulting is conducting a study to find out parents’ and children’s aspirations, and you and your child are invited to take part. The survey will only take about 10 to 15 minutes to complete and there will be $10 worth of NTUC vouchers as a token of appreciation. Click on the following link to indicate your interest to take part: http://www.qresearch.asia/#!survey/chqa

Limited slots are available, so sign up now!

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