Do not neglect your kids.....

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Do not neglect your kids.....

Postby 3Boys » Wed Aug 04, 2010 1:17 pm

Not that parents frequenting KSP will need the admonishment above, but in researching the determinants of early childhood academic performance, I chanced upon a disturbing image.

Image
Head and Brain Size

One does not need to be a doctor to understand the implications. The journal article is here -->

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article ... 135848.pdf

Does the school your child get to have a big impact on his academic performance in the future? Compared to the many other factors at play, my view is that it be much less than people think.....

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Postby noobparent » Wed Aug 04, 2010 5:21 pm

Good stuff and thanks for the reminder.

Yes, young kids love for their parents to play with them and to spend time with them.

My older colleagues tell me to spend more time with my kids, because once they reach their teenage years, they might not want to be with their parents any more.

By that time, if the bond isn't strong, parents might just lose their kids altogether. By that time, it is too late.

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Postby 3Boys » Wed Aug 04, 2010 6:00 pm

Stimjlation drives brain development, and brain development drives head size. That poor child is now disadvantaged for life. Sounds politically incorrect, but are some folk less fit to be parents than others....?

Not referring to parents @ KSP of course.......

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Postby markfch » Thu Aug 05, 2010 10:36 am

3Boys wrote:Stimjlation drives brain development, and brain development drives head size. That poor child is now disadvantaged for life.


Read somewhere (maybe glenn doman) that the first 6 yrs of a child's life are most impt to learning. Cos that's when the brain nerves are growing to connect to each other. After 6 yrs, the brain's computing power is more or less fixed. Ok, ds got 2 more mths to go before 6. I better make full use of the reminding limited period to enlarge his brain :idea:
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Postby cherrygal » Thu Aug 05, 2010 5:27 pm

Oh dear, ds already 6yrs... i hope it's not too late for me to be SAHM mom from next year... The above topic is the precise reason why I decided to be SAHM mom. I think he feels neglected after birth of dd last year. With full time job and need to look after dd, I really have no time for ds, didn't even notice his schoolbag was torn, comm book all not signed... sigh :(

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Postby HyperKiasu » Thu Aug 05, 2010 6:12 pm

markfch wrote:
3Boys wrote:Stimjlation drives brain development, and brain development drives head size. That poor child is now disadvantaged for life.


Read somewhere (maybe glenn doman) that the first 6 yrs of a child's life are most impt to learning. Cos that's when the brain nerves are growing to connect to each other. After 6 yrs, the brain's computing power is more or less fixed. Ok, ds got 2 more mths to go before 6. I better make full use of the reminding limited period to enlarge his brain :idea:


i thought the first 6 yrs is best time to learn language....for other skills, i m not too sure...

don't worry leh, kids will peak at different phases and better let him grow at his own pace....

KSparents not neglect our kids, we need to find a best way to unleash their full potentials... not easy task... :frustrated:

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Postby Blobbi » Fri Aug 06, 2010 5:21 am

Gosh. The journal article certainly looks serious. But the image appears exaggerated. Maybe there's a lot of malnutrition or other factors involved, aside from no stimulation? Maybe at that age, the head size variations are large to begin with because of unequal growth patterns. The implication of the picture is that there should be a huge variation of headsizes out there in the general population. But that's not discernible, at least to me.

Einstien's brain:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/371698.stm

One side of his brain is 15% bigger, but that doesn't seem to be a huge visible difference on the outside. Other differences prevail that are nor correlated to size.

Don't want to miss the forest for the trees. Yep, early stimulation is important, although I'd rephrase that as love, warmth and attention.

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Postby Guest » Fri Aug 06, 2010 7:51 am

:goodpost: blobbi, I could not have said it better. It should not be a task or goal set. It should just be a natural outcome of loving your child.
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Postby 3Boys » Fri Aug 06, 2010 9:15 am

Blobbi wrote:Gosh. The journal article certainly looks serious. But the image appears exaggerated. Maybe there's a lot of malnutrition or other factors involved, aside from no stimulation? Maybe at that age, the head size variations are large to begin with because of unequal growth patterns. The implication of the picture is that there should be a huge variation of headsizes out there in the general population. But that's not discernible, at least to me.

Einstien's brain:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/371698.stm

One side of his brain is 15% bigger, but that doesn't seem to be a huge visible difference on the outside. Other differences prevail that are nor correlated to size.

Don't want to miss the forest for the trees. Yep, early stimulation is important, although I'd rephrase that as love, warmth and attention.


Yes, agree, should not over-interpret, and the juxtaposition of the scans is surely for dramatic effect. I am sure nutritional state and other factors are at play, in fact, that was the point I was trying to make; love, warmth, attention, more than just academic pursuit alone.

However, it is well established that brain plasticity is at its greatest in early years. For instance, newborn mice denied visual stimulation from birth have deficient development of the visual cortex which never ever recovers to normal, all other factors being the same.

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Postby mumma_bear » Tue Aug 10, 2010 11:07 am

I'm not sure if I believe everything the article is saying or the effect is that extreme although I do know that it is genuinely important to not neglect our kids. I observed that they become more confident and can socialize better with their peers if you give them the adequate attention, that's pretty much the reason why I'm a SAHM. :D

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