To migrate or not?

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sweetiepie
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by sweetiepie » Mon Apr 15, 2013 8:44 pm

rains wrote:If you do read my first post, I was trying to balance the negative experiences of migration with a good experience. I wasn't responding to the misery post about having to cook every day at all.

Whether cooking every meal is misery is subjective. And migration is not just about this. If I want to migrate, this is not the first thing on my mind. So there's no need to keep harping on cooking every day as being miserable. And as I've said, I did take leave last year to be a sahm. I enjoyed every minute of it. To me, that's a luxury that I can't afford to have. But I'm not complaining that I've to work.

By 'negative feedback' in my first post, I was referring to comments about having to be treated as 2nd class citizen and no one to be friends with when your neighbors are Ang mohs. I was just offering an alternative view that it may not be true since Australia has a large community of Chinese or Asians.

When you are considering migration, would you be stopped by the need to cook every day'?

I wasn't responding to sweetiepie's miserable struggles with her problems. I saw that the topic was 'to migrate or not?' and not 'migration misery'. My objective was to offer a alternative view about migration ie. good experience versus the many negative views, some of which are probably hearsay.


Isn't this topic abt migration? u mean I cannot share things abt life migrating to Australia. U mean I cannot say what is truth? 1st of all I did not say my neighbor is ang mo. Yes there are a lot of Asian here. my whole building are Chinese mostly from China. It is the support that I do not have like childcare support, emotional support away from friends n family. Lifestyles changes, lower education std..Let's face it, these are somethings we all have to face when migrating. Unless your quality of life still stay the same in both countries.

Abt cooking, if the cost of living is not high and foods here are not expensive who would want to cook every day in Australia. Unless u are well off, spending that type of money is ok. But even my friend who is single and holds a decent job here are bringing food from home to office everyday. U see a lot of working people doing that as well. This is part of the culture here.

I will not go round telling my friends, family or relative abt how bad life is here. Only a few truth friends.will know n my husband. Because nobody knows me in this forum that is why I am willing to share the experience here. Believe or not, only if you truthly experience it, u will know. :drool: :drool:

Canvas
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by Canvas » Mon Apr 15, 2013 8:56 pm

When I was a student in Australia, I cooked everyday too because raw ingredients were way cheaper than eating out. Sometimes when I had whole day classes, I even packed both lunch and dinner. Those HK instant noodles fr asian supermarkets were eaten very frequently too. Years later, I revisited Australia with my family and the amount of $ spent on food reminded me of my poor students days. As a SAHM, I cook a few dinners a week but can easily afford delivery or eating out the rest of the time. If I live abroad and still remains a SAHM, very likely I will cook 3 meals/day x 7 days/week.

Canvas
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by Canvas » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:00 pm

Just to share that my sister and her family tried living in NZ but returned after almost a year because her hubby couldn't find a job. She missed us a lot too especially during festive seasons. I guess her case wasn't successful because a job was not secured before going over. A stable income is very crucial to start anew. There were also friends who are happily living abroad because they have a healthy network of friends and support.

BeContented
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by BeContented » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:14 pm

sweetiepie wrote:Isn't this topic abt migration? u mean I cannot share things abt life migrating to Australia. U mean I cannot say what is truth? 1st of all I did not say my neighbor is ang mo. Yes there are a lot of Asian here. my whole building are Chinese mostly from China. It is the support that I do not have like childcare support, emotional support away from friends n family. Lifestyles changes, lower education std..Let's face it, these are somethings we all have to face when migrating. Unless your quality of life still stay the same in both countries.

Abt cooking, if the cost of living is not high and foods here are not expensive who would want to cook every day in Australia. Unless u are well off, spending that type of money is ok. But even my friend who is single and holds a decent job here are bringing food from home to office everyday. U see a lot of working people doing that as well. This is part of the culture here.

I will not go round telling my friends, family or relative abt how bad life is here. Only a few truth friends.will know n my husband. Because nobody knows me in this forum that is why I am willing to share the experience here. Believe or not, only if you truthly experience it, u will know. :drool: :drool:


Would you believe me if I say I kinda understand a little? :wink:
My aunt migrated to Australia years ago but she comes back SG & stay in my mom's house 1-2 times a year. Each time 3-6 weeks. Whenever people ask her how is Australia, she will claim 'Good. Better than SG'. But in private, during her chats with my mom, we know the real picture is not as rosy as what she portrays to others..........

Mawar
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by Mawar » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:21 pm

The best case scenario is to have the chance to experience long stay in a different country. Call it migration, sabbatical, long stint... it will bring open our eyes and minds to different ways of living.


Coolkidsrock2
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by Coolkidsrock2 » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:34 pm

Both hubby and myself studied overseas - Canada and Australia respectively. And cost of living - housing (very expensive in locations which are deemed safe), private schools (the people whom I know all send their kids to private schools so I am unfamiliar with public school system), medical, paid help, childcare, etc, possible job discrimination, high tax are some of the genuine deterrents for us.

Even for some who had migrated 10-15 years back are trying to come back because things are no longer rosy there. But they are finding it hard to find a job back here too.

Different people have different experiences in their new country so opinions may be quite varied. But there are certain factors which will make the transition or move easier and one needs to consider it in the light of one's own situation.

sunflower
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by sunflower » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:46 pm

I have friends who migrated to Australia. If you are alone with young children, no hubby or any family or friends support, it can be quite tough. That’s what a friend told me. Her married friend drives all the way to visit my friend (staying in the city) quite often because her friend (staying in the suburb) feels lonely. :shrug:

sunflower
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by sunflower » Mon Apr 15, 2013 9:52 pm

I was in Australia (Perth) many years ago for a few years, married with no children at that time. I cooked but not everyday. There were places where you could find reasonably priced food in addition to the typical Fish n Chips, such as Japanese, Italian, French, Chinese, all very authentic, except Chinese food which most modified to suit the ang mo taste. These were mostly take-out places, some with limited seating capacity. I had really authentic and yummy Japanese food, ranging from A$3.50 to A$6, Italian food at about A$9, yummy chicken rice (A$5) and dim sum (A$2 – A$3 per plate) in Chinatown. Even tried French delicacy at their “market” for A$5 (I think, can’t really remember now). Restaurants would definitely cost more, but they did not have service charge and GST, but we gave tips. Come to think of it, it’s quite similar to the cost now if I eat out at restaurants in Singapore.

Went to Melbourne a few years ago for holiday. Found they sell really HUGE sushi near a train station. Bought one row, (for A$5?, can’t remember now but thought it was quite reasonable for THAT size of sushi). Was REALLY full after eating. Hee, hee, I love sushi so if I’m staying there, I can eat that (with different kinds of fillings) everyday. :drool:

I’m not sure whether things have changed and whether prices have gone up, but I guess if we know where to "dig" in the suburbs, we may be able to find places that sell “cheaper” food. :wink:

Canvas
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by Canvas » Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:03 pm

sunflower wrote:I was in Australia (Perth) many years ago for a few years, married with no children at that time. I cooked but not everyday. There were places where you could find reasonably priced food in addition to the typical Fish n Chips, such as Japanese, Italian, French, Chinese, all very authentic, except Chinese food which most modified to suit the ang mo taste. These were mostly take-out places, some with limited seating capacity. I had really authentic and yummy Japanese food, ranging from A$3.50 to A$6, Italian food at about A$9, yummy chicken rice (A$5) and dim sum (A$2 – A$3 per plate) in Chinatown. Even tried French delicacy at their “market” for A$5 (I think, can’t really remember now). Restaurants would definitely cost more, but they did not have service charge and GST, but we gave tips. Come to think of it, it’s quite similar to the cost now if I eat out at restaurants in Singapore.

Went to Melbourne a few years ago for holiday. Found they sell really HUGE sushi near a train station. Bought one row, (for A$5?, can’t remember now but thought it was quite reasonable for THAT size of sushi). Was REALLY full after eating. Hee, hee, I love sushi so if I’m staying there, I can eat that (with different kinds of fillings) everyday. :drool:

I’m not sure whether things have changed and whether prices have gone up, but I guess if we know where to "dig" in the suburbs, we may be able to find places that sell “cheaper” food. :wink:


Those big sushi were one of the those food I used to tabao once in a while when I was a student. Love them! Especially the breaded prawn ones and last time was cheaper at AUD2.50! The Chinese takeaway were not cheap, easily AUD$8 but my days, the exchange rate was very good unlike now :wink:

sunflower
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Re: To migrate or not?

Post by sunflower » Mon Apr 15, 2013 10:38 pm

BeContented wrote:Would you believe me if I say I kinda understand a little? :wink:
My aunt migrated to Australia years ago but she comes back SG & stay in my mom's house 1-2 times a year. Each time 3-6 weeks. Whenever people ask her how is Australia, she will claim 'Good. Better than SG'. But in private, during her chats with my mom, we know the real picture is not as rosy as what she portrays to others..........

Hee, hee, is it during the cold winter and very hot summer when your aunt comes back to Singapore? :wink:

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