Studying Abroad : New Chinese thinking

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Studying Abroad : New Chinese thinking

Postby dragonflysg » Mon Feb 20, 2012 1:56 pm

An article from International Herald Tribute on a new trend in China viewing those retunring from education broad for not having enough English and subject depth to survive in Chinese competition, while having the "holoer than thou" mentality preventing them from integrating back into the Chinese society. Worth taking note and to ensure we (have not not) do not fall into the same pifalls.

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http://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com/201 ... -tuitions/


Chinese Students Paying U.S. Tuitions — How? And Why?
By MARK MCDONALD| February 7, 2012, 8:08 pm

Rendezvous recently poked around the issue of Chinese high school students doctoring their applications to gain admission to U.S universities. Surveys and anecdotal evidence suggest that more than half of all Chinese students will have faked something in their admission packets.

What we were unable to explore in our original piece, however, was how these students and their families finance their American college educations. U.S students amass debt, of course, but educational loans in China are virtually unheard of.

“I’m always surprised by how indifferent Chinese parents are to costs,’’ said Jiang Xueqin, the deputy principal of Peking University High School, one of China’s s premier schools. He helps students and their families with their study-abroad plans, and he wrote to us at length about the contours of this highly nuanced issue.


Keith Bedford for The New York Times
Students on Hainan worked on their English skills at a morning study session.“Most of our parents are indeed well-connected and wealthy,” Mr. Jiang said, “although it’s extremely unclear how much money they actually have. A government official in Beijing may officially make 5,000 yuan a month’’ — about $790 — “but there’s no way that he’s only making that much money.”

Tuition at Mr. Jiang’s high school is nearly $12,700 a year, he said.

Many upwardly mobile Chinese families, especially those who have adhered to the state’s one-child policy, have been saving for years to pay for college. If they’re still short, they might sell their apartment, and extended family members might kick in.

Of Mr. Jiang’s 43 current students, only one has explicitly told him that she cannot afford overseas study. So she’s looking for a scholarship.

Foreign students are highly prized (and heavily recruited) by budget-challenged public universities in the United States because the foreigners typically pay much higher tuition fees than in-state students.

At the highly ranked University of Michigan, for example, an incoming freshman from Shanghai is charged nearly $38,000 in annual tuition and fees, while a kid from Kalamazoo will pay less than $13,000. Add in books, travel, room, board and the occasional 2 a.m. pizza, and the Chinese student will be well over $50,000.

Mr. Jiang noted the tension that often arises when it becomes clear that the Chinese (or other foreign students) are paying far more than their in-state counterparts.

“The locals think that the Chinese are rich foreigners, while the Chinese think they’re paying for the lazy locals to go to school,’’ Mr. Jiang said. “This disparity also leads to a mentality among Chinese students that they are ‘purchasing’ the American university degree.”

So why do Chinese parents spend so much money?

“While there’s a minority of parents who think an American education superior, I think most see an American college degree as a luxury goods item — they want the ‘face’ value of an American-educated child. This study-abroad phenomenon is also benefiting from a herd mentality.”

At Mr. Jiang’s school, the parents look most closely at the rankings by U.S. News & World Report.

“They’re usually aiming for a top 50 school,’’ he said. “The really prestigious brands in China are Harvard (every parent’s dream school), Yale, Princeton, MIT, Stanford, and Wharton.

Mr. Jiang also mentioned a new trend he’s seeing — “a growing consensus within China that Chinese students who’ve studied abroad and who return to China are becoming a social problem.’’

“They return with limited English and limited marketable skills, yet they also have high expectations,’’ he said.

“As well, while they really don’t fit in America, they have also developed habits and ways of thinking that don’t permit them to integrate back into Chinese society easily.’’

dragonflysg
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Re: Studying Abroad : New Chinese thinking

Postby dragonflysg » Mon Feb 20, 2012 3:30 pm

A piece of information for the context of this article. Chinese Master Degree holders typically earn about USD600-USD800 per month. Many fresh graduates in some cities also do first 1-3 months work for free to show the employers that they are good to get placements.

China produces about 6.2 million bachelor degree holders a year. India produces like 8 million+ a year, but please fact check for numbers. India BCom (Bachelor of Commerence) graduates get paid like USD400-USD600 a month. IIT and IIM graduates get much better prospects for having solid global alumni networks.

That is the kind of (crazy) competition in China and India.

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Re: Studying Abroad : New Chinese thinking

Postby pinky » Tue Feb 21, 2012 8:58 am

no wonder they come here in droves :evil:

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