Can anyone share - Notes taking techniques for Maths

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Can anyone share - Notes taking techniques for Maths

Postby happyheart » Fri Mar 09, 2012 11:17 am

Noticed DS is absorbing at most 50% of information during Maths lesson. He understands what is being taught ( but lose interest and focus after a while) and once he gets home, he will face difficulties to remember the methods taught for problem sums. I figured the only way is to take notes so that he can refer back. It would be quite straight forward to do so for other subjects , but for Maths...does anyone has a way to do it? or a sample on how it can be done?

Appreciate all feedback. :thankyou: in advance!

happyheart
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Re: Can anyone share - Notes taking techniques for Maths

Postby Chenonceau » Fri Mar 09, 2012 11:44 am

happyheart wrote:Noticed DS is absorbing at most 50% of information during Maths lesson. He understands what is being taught ( but lose interest and focus after a while) and once he gets home, he will face difficulties to remember the methods taught for problem sums. I figured the only way is to take notes so that he can refer back. It would be quite straight forward to do so for other subjects , but for Maths...does anyone has a way to do it? or a sample on how it can be done?

Appreciate all feedback. :thankyou: in advance!


A child taking notes is a process fraught with error. Since our textbooks don't document much of what the child needs to know, you need other professional quality resources. Either your kid is in GEP, and gets resources written by GEP branch OR you buy resources as follows for Math...

(1) Visible Thinking (Ammiel Wan) For poor students
(2) Challenging Problem Sums (Ammiel Wan) For mid-level students
(3) Onsponge (Ammiel Wan) For strong students.
(4) Model Approach to Problem-Solving (Sunny Tan)
(5) Unit Transfer Method (Sunny Tan)

If your child is very weak, start with Simon Eio's Step-by-Step series so as to be non-threatening. Do not try to be too ambitious by plunging straight into books (3), (4) and (5) immediately.

Kumon worksheets are invaluable for building computational accuracy and speed.

Chenonceau
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Re: Can anyone share - Notes taking techniques for Maths

Postby atutor2001 » Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:27 pm

happyheart wrote:Noticed DS is absorbing at most 50% of information during Maths lesson. He understands what is being taught ( but lose interest and focus after a while) and once he gets home, he will face difficulties to remember the methods taught for problem sums. I figured the only way is to take notes so that he can refer back. It would be quite straight forward to do so for other subjects , but for Maths...does anyone has a way to do it? or a sample on how it can be done?

Appreciate all feedback. :thankyou: in advance!


In sec school (some Pr sch) they have this thing called "reflection". Students are asked to write "reflection" on what they have learned after each topic / problem sum. This is the only way to learn math but unfortunately only those good in math understand what "reflection" is all about. Subconsciously, they reflected on each problem sum solved. They are not interested in the final answer. They are only interested in why was it solved that way. Is there a better way....

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Re: Can anyone share - Notes taking techniques for Maths

Postby happyheart » Fri Mar 09, 2012 2:51 pm

Thank you Ladies for sharing!

Chenonceau, I have several assessment books (visible thinking, step by step and some others maths guide). The problem with DS is that he is not 'locking in' information during maths lessons, then those books become somewhat not effective because when he look At them, the numbers just 'stared blankly' back at him! Strangely, he can remember details for English and Science without much effort. Hence, I thought perhaps to come up with a way to make Maths notes, i.e signs, arrows, connectors etc, in whichever way that may prove helpful when he look back. I am not the creative type...been cracking my head on how to go about it. But, I think you are right about starting him at his right level and not give him what is beyond him.
aTutor2001, reflection for maths is a new idea to me. Perhaps, it is possible to improvise to suit school-age kids in upper primary whom are
not strong in the subject.

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