Overseas Immersion Programmes

General comments and chit-chat, or tell us how we can improve KiasuParents.com
Post Reply
ngl2010
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 7412
Joined: Tue May 24,
Total Likes:76

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by ngl2010 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 9:55 am

slmkhoo wrote:
ngl2010 wrote:My niece travelled ALONE to Europe for 1 month after her A levels. She is so daring! I won’t allow DS to travel alone for 1 month overseas at 18yo. When I asked her how she ensure her safety, she told me she carries penknife all the time. :faint:
I wouldn't allow that either! How did her parents feel about it? Even my husband and I, at our age and with our experience, wouldn't travel alone like that. There are just too many risks, and unless she is extremely good at self-defence, a penknife isn't going to help! Travelling from point to point would probably be safer - I would be fine if my daughter wanted to visit friends overseas, travelling from place to place, for a month (depending on where and how).
Of course she went with her parents' permission. The parents doesn't think it is dangerous. Oh well... I guess it is different parenting style... :shrug:

Btw, she doesn't know any self defence.

slmkhoo
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 11237
Joined: Wed Sep 15,
Total Likes:210

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by slmkhoo » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:38 am

ngl2010 wrote:
slmkhoo wrote:
ngl2010 wrote:My niece travelled ALONE to Europe for 1 month after her A levels. She is so daring! I won’t allow DS to travel alone for 1 month overseas at 18yo. When I asked her how she ensure her safety, she told me she carries penknife all the time. :faint:
I wouldn't allow that either! How did her parents feel about it? Even my husband and I, at our age and with our experience, wouldn't travel alone like that. There are just too many risks, and unless she is extremely good at self-defence, a penknife isn't going to help! Travelling from point to point would probably be safer - I would be fine if my daughter wanted to visit friends overseas, travelling from place to place, for a month (depending on where and how).
Of course she went with her parents' permission. The parents doesn't think it is dangerous. Oh well... I guess it is different parenting style... :shrug:

Btw, she doesn't know any self defence.
My mother is worried about my daughter going with 3 friends on a conducted tour! This the same person who waved me off at the airport at 19yo for 9 mths on the other side of the globe, when there was no email/mobile phone/whatsapp etc. I find it quite funny!

laughingcat
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 2782
Joined: Wed Jan 14,
Total Likes:15

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by laughingcat » Fri Feb 02, 2018 11:38 am

ngl2010 wrote:My niece travelled ALONE to Europe for 1 month after her A levels. She is so daring! I won’t allow DS to travel alone for 1 month overseas at 18yo. When I asked her how she ensure her safety, she told me she carried penknife all the time. :faint:
:yikes:
gal travelling alone in Europe cannot lah.

MrsKiasu
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 11809
Joined: Mon Jul 18,
Total Likes:41

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by MrsKiasu » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:06 pm

Young gals travelling alone a no no to me too.

floppy
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 6997
Joined: Wed Jul 31,
Gender: Male
Total Likes:164

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by floppy » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:07 pm

I guess it is different parenting style...
IMHO, if by 18yo, we can't trust the kid to travel alone, or at least have faith in the kid's ability to make decision / apply common sense when travelling alone, we have a major problem.

Two generations ago, 18yo are dodging bullets, avoiding getting gassed and figuring out the best way to liberate the world. Now they are being associated with this fruit...

Image

While I have no wish for my kids to be dodging bullets, I think there's a point in time where they have to learn to fend for themselves. Keeping them safe, probably with the best intentions, may not necessarily produce the best results.


dolphin11
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 01,
Total Likes:1

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by dolphin11 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:23 pm

Jennifer wrote:
dolphin11 wrote:Its our turn to "storm" through this.. oversea trip across the causeway for primary schooler.. 2days 1 night
Are our children ready for the paradox box to be opened?

Here's my consideration:
- Bullying - be it verbal or physical is common these days. 2 to 3 children shared the same room. This is a good opportunity for peers to tease or bully. do they know to stand up for themselves ? do they fear of jeopardizing the 'friendship'? can they choose their room mates? do we need to wait for damage or traumatize to be done? or can we wait for them to develop the sense of judgement?

- to lead or to follow : with a few children in the same room .. what fun stuff will they be up to in the absence of an adult at night? all it takes is one to lead and the rest to follow. is our children sensible enough not to follow and brave enough to say No, this is wrong i do not want to follow?

- Connection to the world through wifi... Do we know what site they are viewing? I often seen children crowding around a child with handheld device. Not all parents are technology savy to setup parental blocks. does the kids know what content is viewable and what are junk?

- destination : no matter how 'safe' it is. Natural or man-made disaster can happen any time. The recent effect of monsoon wind in sg is a reminder. terrorist attack, kidnapping, missing.. these news are often covered up. what can we do as a parent? To be realistic, we cannot prevent. if it meant to happen, it will happen. At least, i want to be there if such things happen until the child develop sense of awareness or safety skills.

-value systems : perks such as shopping time slot and buffet style breakfast and 5 star hotel are provided in the package. I wonder what kind of value system are we inculcating. In our family trip, we do backpack.. means usually on shoe string budget. culturally teaching them to be shopper and travel luxury? This is something that i m not comfortable with.

- understanding history of other countries: do we really need to go there to appreciate? how many historical sites in sg have we bring our children to?

I am all for stay in camps hosted locally where children get a taste of disciplines, and community sharing under the watchful eyes of adults. Yes, its not easy to disallow. that's why i label it as "storm".

Trust your parenting methods and trust yourself that you have brought up your child well.
we just had an episode of bullying. not about parenting methods. :) sometimes its just a mattar of time for them to develop the skills to say no. :)

dolphin11
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Feb 01,
Total Likes:1

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by dolphin11 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:30 pm

slmkhoo wrote:Dolphin11's child is still in pr school? I would probably not allow if he was my child. I don't see the need, and I feel that kids of that age are still too young to travel in groups away from family.

From the mid-teens, I think kids should be sensible and independent enough to travel in school groups.

This year, my 18yo daughter is planning to go on a week's holiday with 3 other girls. The various parents have told them that if they go on a tour, we're OK with it. By next year, she may well be living overseas and I will just have to trust her good sense, so this is a "try-out". I studied overseas from 19yo, and travelled extensively with friends, and it was fine. A lot depends on the child's maturity and good sense.
yes he is primary schooler. I am trying share in this group that it's ok not to go . Why risk if you know your child's senses has not develop? Look deeper into the purpose. Is it necessary in the first place?

janet88
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 40512
Joined: Tue Oct 20,
Total Likes:135

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by janet88 » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:34 pm

hubby is paranoid about kids going overseas. i thought i am worse. anyway, son's japan trip is fully packed itinerary. planning to apply for a debit card for him. at least he can buy something he likes.

Cloud Cloud
BrownBelt
BrownBelt
Posts: 624
Joined: Mon Aug 28,

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by Cloud Cloud » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:44 pm

dolphin11 wrote:
slmkhoo wrote:Dolphin11's child is still in pr school? I would probably not allow if he was my child. I don't see the need, and I feel that kids of that age are still too young to travel in groups away from family.

From the mid-teens, I think kids should be sensible and independent enough to travel in school groups.

This year, my 18yo daughter is planning to go on a week's holiday with 3 other girls. The various parents have told them that if they go on a tour, we're OK with it. By next year, she may well be living overseas and I will just have to trust her good sense, so this is a "try-out". I studied overseas from 19yo, and travelled extensively with friends, and it was fine. A lot depends on the child's maturity and good sense.
yes he is primary schooler. I am trying share in this group that it's ok not to go . Why risk if you know your child's senses has not develop? Look deeper into the purpose. Is it necessary in the first place?
Unless it is to take part in competition, I will not allow my primary school child to travel overseas. Agree, not worth the risk.

In fact, I did not even allow dd1 to take part in the swimming lessons conducted by her primary school. I cannot trust the teacher and trainer to take care of so many children in the pool.

Zeit
BlackBelt
BlackBelt
Posts: 963
Joined: Mon Jun 19,
Total Likes:15

Re: Overseas Immersion Programmes

Post by Zeit » Fri Feb 02, 2018 12:50 pm

dolphin11 wrote: we just had an episode of bullying. not about parenting methods. :) sometimes its just a mattar of time for them to develop the skills to say no. :)
Your child was recently bullied by his classmates and you don't feel good that he's going to be with them on this overseas trip? Won't there be a buddy system or 1 teacher: 5 kids to look out for one another?

If you judge that your son's not mature or street smart enough, it's best to opt out. There's very little culture/heritage to learn across the Causeway (unless they are going to Malacca or Penang). You can take him there yourself.

I just don't feel safe when you mentioned Causeway, which means they are travelling by coach. I rather be the one controlling the wheel. Any mishap, I take full responsibility!

Post Reply