Education - Click only if you are a Singapore Citizen :)

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Education - Click only if you are a Singapore Citizen :)

Postby Guest » Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:59 pm

Here is a discussion for Singapore citizens ONLY - to humour ourselves not for foreigners to bash us please. Thank you.

What do you think is one major outcome of our rigorous education system here since so much time and energy is channelled into it?

Personally I think one major learning outcome in our education system is learn to "SPEAK UP" at every opportunity. Inevitably it has gravitated towards "Complain" so there is something still missing here in the learning process.

"Speak up but analyse before doing so"

I hear children in school making complaints easily and certainly cascaded from adults.

Please do not discuss deeply into this point about complaining as this is not the intent(you can agree this is the point and elaborate a little) but I would like to hear what other outcomes(positive and negative) you have observed.

I see the "speak up" as a positive outcome to make people share their thoughts more readily but the negative outcome is "the approach to speak up is not so well taught" in schools. Just sharing my 2cts only for fun.
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Postby titank » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:08 pm

ks2me,

Its true that many of us are not really train in "Speak Up'.That why there are many "Yes Man, Yes Man" in the working society.

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Postby Guest » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:17 pm

titank wrote:ks2me,

Its true that many of us are not really train in "Speak Up'.That why there are many "Yes Man, Yes Man" in the working society.


Glad we observe the same point... Encourage to "speak up" but not trained how to do so effectively. :celebrate:

Any other outcomes to share?
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Postby daisyt » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:29 pm

From what I observe from my girl's school, they have many assignment on project works and presentations. Even for Dance and Speech & Drama and Arts, also need to do presentation. They also have a team of support leaders, trained to guide the juniors, plan and participate on the orientation programmes. I see she is more open, more daring to speak up, compare to last year primary school time. From what she told me, in her class of 30 students, there are a few (maybe 5) of them are open and dare to speak up type.

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Postby tamarind » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:33 pm

The major outcome, is that all children, no matter how poor or rich, are given equal opportunities to excel, if the child has high learning ability and is willing to work hard.

I myself grew up in a very poor family. I received scholarships all the way to university. There are many free learning resources, like the library that poor children can make use of. My brother received scholarships to study all the way to PhD in a prestigious university in UK.

I will not be where I am today, if not for this education system. Even though it is not perfect, and there are lots of rooms for improvement, I am still very grateful to the system.

I also like it that we have an opportunity to excel in our mother tongue. I have quite a few relatives who migrated to UK and USA. I don't envy them because their kids are growing up not knowing how to read and write in Chinese. It is very important that my kids know Chinese very well, because it is our heritage and culture.

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Postby Guest » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:40 pm

daisyt wrote:From what I observe from my girl's school, they have many assignment on project works and presentations. Even for Dance and Speech & Drama and Arts, also need to do presentation. They also have a team of support leaders, trained to guide the juniors, plan and participate on the orientation programmes. I see she is more open, more daring to speak up, compare to last year primary school time. From what she told me, in her class of 30 students, there are a few (maybe 5) of them are open and dare to speak up type.


Oh, from your sharing, it seems that more will be done at the secondary level to "teach them how to speak up effectively". Thanks for sharing.
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Postby Guest » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:48 pm

tamarind wrote:The major outcome, is that all children, no matter how poor or rich, are given equal opportunities to excel, if the child has high learning ability and is willing to work hard.

I myself grew up in a very poor family. I received scholarships all the way to university. There are many free learning resources, like the library that poor children can make use of. My brother received scholarships to study all the way to PhD in a prestigious university in UK.

I will not be where I am today, if not for this education system. Even though it is not perfect, and there are lots of rooms for improvement, I am still very grateful to the system.

I also like it that we have an opportunity to excel in our mother tongue. I have quite a few relatives who migrated to UK and USA. I don't envy them because their kids are growing up not knowing how to read and write in Chinese. It is very important that my kids know Chinese very well, because it is our heritage and culture.


To summarise the outcome perceived are:
1. equal opportunity to excel
2. opportunity to excel in mother tongue

Yes I especially like the point on the emphasis on Mother tongue. I think this is one part the education tries hard to let all races maintain a certain competency levels of our mother tongues whether majority or minorities. Kudos! :rahrah: In other countries, Chinese race being minority, will have no focus.

For point 1, I agree the education system is fair, just that in today's context some parents and service providers can drive it to be "less fair" by changing the competitive landscape, eg. GEP but that one no control la.
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Postby daisyt » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:52 pm

Actually I came across one incident when my girl was in P5. There was this Chinese teacher, very bad attitute in teaching. All the students in my girl's class sign a peitition and send a few representatives (if I remember correctly, 3 boys from their class) to speak to the principal.

I always remind my girl, its ok to speak up your views but cannot be rude.

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Postby daisyt » Thu Oct 15, 2009 1:54 pm

tamarind wrote:It is very important that my kids know Chinese very well, because it is our heritage and culture.


tamarind, I am with you on this point. :D
I have been telling / brain washed my girl since she was young, that I cannot accept my child unable to speak Mandarin and cannnot write Chinese. :D

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Postby tamarind » Thu Oct 15, 2009 2:04 pm

For point 1, I agree the education system is fair, just that in today's context some parents and service providers can drive it to be "less fair" by changing the competitive landscape, eg. GEP but that one no control la.


It all depends on whether a child is willing to work hard. I have always heard of kids who got into the GEP without the need to attend any enrichment classes or tuition.

Even if a very gifted child cannot get into the GEP because he is not "trained" in doing the GEP test papers, that does not mean that he is deprived of a good future. He can still go on to do very well in his A-levels, and get scholarships to study in any of the top universities in the world. He just have to work harder than the rich kids :wink:

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