97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2008

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97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2008

Postby kiasubeng » Tue Sep 17, 2013 4:31 pm

http://www.todayonline.com/singapore/mp ... industry-0


Senior Minister of State (Law and Education) Indranee Rajah said that Singapore’s education system is “run on the basis that tuition is not necessary”.

...


...citing figures from 2008 that showed that about 97 per cent of Singaporean students enrolled in tuition and enrichment classes compared to only 49 and 30 per cent of primary and secondary school students who did so in 1992
...


kiasubeng
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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby janet88 » Wed Sep 18, 2013 7:23 am

how can a teacher possibly reach out to all 40 students in a class?

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby cfan » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:00 am

See TODAY

"Why I don’t send my children for tuition"


From
Vivien Tan
-
5 hours 43 min ago

I refer to the report, “MPs call for closer look at private tuition industry” (Sept 17). I am not an advocate of tuition, and my children have never had tuition.

While my daughter in Primary 5 is an average student, I do not foresee a need to benchmark her results against her sister — who was in the top 10 per cent of the Primary School Leaving Examination cohort last year — and send her for tuition to ace the examinations.

I believe in giving my children a holistic education, balancing academic results with character development, moral values and their passion in the arts.

I was shocked when my younger daughter said recently that she is probably the only one in class not having tuition. Some of her classmates even have two tutors for every subject.

It is shocking that households here spent S$820 million on tuition in 2008. The money could be put to better use, such as art and music classes, saving for university and family holidays.

I trust our education system and the curriculum the Education Ministry has developed over the years. Coupled with qualified teachers, I believe that every school will put in its best to equip pupils with a good understanding of all academic subjects.

Doing well in school has a lot to do with self-discipline and little to do with the number of tuition classes one attends, if teachers are doing their jobs, pupils are attentive and parents are motivating and supervising their children and their schoolwork.

With a heavy workload in school, co-curricular activities, supplementary classes and other school-related activities, having tuition would leave children with little time for leisure and homework. Without tuition, my children have an invaluable asset: More time for family bonding.

Perhaps it is time to regulate the private-tuition industry. Many tuition centres advertise that they produce Singapore’s top pupils. While this could be true, it gives the misconception that those who do not go for tuition would fare worse than those who do.

cfan
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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby kevkevkaf » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:25 am

Just my 2 cents, the tuition situation is akin to an arms races developing in the world. Everyone is looking for that competitive or technological edge and tuition provides the additional training to differentiate ourselves apart from the other students.

In army terms, we may be in infantry but if you go for special forces training (AKA TUITION) you become an elite solider.

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby Sun_2010 » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:35 am

kevkevkaf wrote:Just my 2 cents, the tuition situation is akin to an arms races developing in the world. Everyone is looking for that competitive or technological edge and tuition provides the additional training to differentiate ourselves apart from the other students.

In army terms, we may be in infantry but if you go for special forces training (AKA TUITION) you become an elite solider.


Liked the comparison with the arms race, kevkevkaf.
But disagree that it makes "an elite soilder" . With almost every one going to tuition/enrichment - not going might turn out to be a disadvantage. Going to one does not make one elite.

And my guess is not all benefit from such enrichment/tuition. I have seen cases where tuition is adding to the stress, workload and making the child inefficient. Conflict in teaching methods, different topics being handled in school / tuition centres , bad followup, too many changes in tuition teachers - not good for the child's learning.

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby limlim » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:42 am

cfan wrote:See TODAY

"Why I don’t send my children for tuition"


From
Vivien Tan
-
5 hours 43 min ago

I refer to the report, “MPs call for closer look at private tuition industry” (Sept 17). I am not an advocate of tuition, and my children have never had tuition.

While my daughter in Primary 5 is an average student, I do not foresee a need to benchmark her results against her sister — who was in the top 10 per cent of the Primary School Leaving Examination cohort last year — and send her for tuition to ace the examinations.

I believe in giving my children a holistic education, balancing academic results with character development, moral values and their passion in the arts.

I was shocked when my younger daughter said recently that she is probably the only one in class not having tuition. Some of her classmates even have two tutors for every subject.

It is shocking that households here spent S$820 million on tuition in 2008. The money could be put to better use, such as art and music classes, saving for university and family holidays.

I trust our education system and the curriculum the Education Ministry has developed over the years. Coupled with qualified teachers, I believe that every school will put in its best to equip pupils with a good understanding of all academic subjects.

Doing well in school has a lot to do with self-discipline and little to do with the number of tuition classes one attends, if teachers are doing their jobs, pupils are attentive and parents are motivating and supervising their children and their schoolwork.

With a heavy workload in school, co-curricular activities, supplementary classes and other school-related activities, having tuition would leave children with little time for leisure and homework. Without tuition, my children have an invaluable asset: More time for family bonding.

Perhaps it is time to regulate the private-tuition industry. Many tuition centres advertise that they produce Singapore’s top pupils. While this could be true, it gives the misconception that those who do not go for tuition would fare worse than those who do.


:goodpost:

long overdue..

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby limlim » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:44 am

Sun_2010 wrote:
And my guess is not all benefit from such enrichment/tuition. I have seen cases where tuition is adding to the stress, workload and making the child inefficient. Conflict in teaching methods, different topics being handled in school / tuition centres , bad followup, too many changes in tuition teachers - not good for the child's learning.


The only sure winners are the enrichment centers, not the students.. :laugh:

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby ngl2010 » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:50 am

There is an article in The Straits Times page B2 (Home Section) on this issue today. One example quoted is an RGS student that has 7 hours of tuition weekly.

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby pirate » Thu Sep 19, 2013 10:56 am

The problem with our education system is that students are scored relatively. Their pathways up to success are also scored relatively. How well a student does is not solely dependent on how well he or she does. It is also dependent on how others do.

To illustrate the practical effect of this, let me introduce you to a little computer game called Puzzle Pirates.

Unlike other games, players of Puzzle Pirates do not advance in ranking by 'levelling up'. Instead, ranking is relative. So, you may actually be pretty decent in a particular shipboard 'duty' puzzle, but if most of the other players are better than you, you will be ranked at 'Proficient' or even 'Able', ie. at the bottom 50%. You can improve, but if others also improve, you will forever be stuck at Proficient or Able. The net result is other players think you suck, and so won't invite you to join some of their cooler expeditions.

In our education system, a student can be pretty decent. But if most other students are better, he/she will always score below average. The net result is he/she will not be able to get into the 'cooler' secondary schools and higher institutes of learning etc.

In Puzzle Pirates, one way out of rut for players is to become extremely good at a few, or even only 1 of the critical puzzles. So, if you become Legendary (top ?%) or even Ultimate (top 1%) in swordfighting, you can get on a cool Atlantis expedition even if you are Proficient in almost every other thing. If you are exceptional in foraging, you would be able to get on a Cursed Isles expedition, provided that your other shipboard skills are not so horrible that the captain of the boat is worried you may get them sunk. Or one can become exceptional at 'parlour games', use that skill to win tournaments (ie. beat everybody else!) and buy all the cool stuff without ever having to step onboard a ship.

Likewise, in our education system, if one wants to advance by the "legendary/ultimate" route, one has to be really exceptional (not merely very good) in something, and rely on DSA to a suitable higher institution of learning. Or one can aspire to be so exceptional in other skills, eg. music, sports or business, and advance by earning so much money in those fields, and have no need to go to mainstream university.

In puzzle pirates, the question most players have to decide is whether to 'grind' at most of the duty puzzles until they can get decent (but not exceptional) overall stats, or to devote study into one or two puzzles they can become exceptional at them. In our education system, the question is whether to grind out decent overall results, or devote study to become exceptional at something else.

Whatever one chooses, the path will always be competitive. Only a very small handful can become exceptional in more than a few things.

And that is why most parents think that tuition is necessary. It is not just how well a child does in school. It is also how well the other children are doing in school compared to one's child. For the majority of children who do not possess some exceptional ability, grinding becomes a necessity.

But, one can also decide in Puzzle Pirates to make do without all the cool (but really superfluous if one thinks about it) stuff like big houses, exclusive furniture, dressed-up limited edition ships, snazzy clothes etc and still play just to have fun. Likewise, one can decide to make do without all the cool (but really superfluous) real-life stuff like big flats, cars, designer wear, overseas holidays etc.

Or one can learn to play poker in Puzzle Pirates, or go to the casino in real life...

The problem with the problem of our education system is, that is how real life and the rest of world works, even in a little computer game. The other problem is that, unlike Puzzle Pirates, choosing not to play is not really a viable option.

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Re: 97% of Singaporean students are enrolled in tuition in 2

Postby kiasubeng » Thu Sep 19, 2013 11:00 am

cfan wrote:See TODAY

"Why I don’t send my children for tuition"


From
Vivien Tan
-
.....

With a heavy workload in school, co-curricular activities, supplementary classes and other school-related activities, having tuition would leave children with little time for leisure and homework. Without tuition, my children have an invaluable asset: More time for family bonding.
...



I am speculating that the school is one of those that pushes academically.

Not all schools give heavy workload and provide sufficient supplementary classes. For example, there's no supplementary classes in my kid's school during the Sept holiday. I wonder how would kids with no tuition and poor results is going to play catch up since time is ticking away.

At the heart of it, lots of teachers are also burdened by admin tasks on top of teaching. How will MOE address this? Will the govt. allocate more budget to hire admin staffs so that teachers can spend more time on teaching?

Likewise not all parents are capable of helping their kids cope with their studies; hence the need for external help in the form of tuition. After all, it is easier to correct the kid's mistakes when they are young.

The govt. also tries to lower the expectations that academic results is not important. Yet at every junction it is the very benchmark that determines if one gets into a particular course/school (eg. entry into Poly courses or Universities).

But, let me go back to the stats. 97% of students take tuition in 2008 compared to only 49% in 1997.

That is a huge jump.

I have tried to figure out what causes the jump. Without more data, my suspicion is the introduction of the Integrated Programme back in 2002.

It does not take a genius to see that the supply of vacancies in top schools are being reduced especially for the junior colleges. A huge portion is now taken up for those in IP.

And if the situation is not bad enough, statistics also tells us that more students from the top colleges get into University (by a huge margin).

Remember, not all schools are equal.

That changes the whole mindset for parents. They know that preparation for University needs to start early rather than to let 'fate' takes its course.

And unfortunately, the situation favours the gifted and those who are better off financially.

The lower income group, which needs the most help, is now being discriminated in a system that claims meritocracy is its core belief.

It is unlikely that MOE is going to do away with IP after announcing additional IP schools. The 'need' for tuition is not going to change and whatever tweaks that they come out with will be 'game' by the parents looking for the extra edge.

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