Interesting article from a "tuition" kid experienc

General comments and chit-chat, or tell us how we can improve KiasuParents.com

Interesting article from a "tuition" kid experienc

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 01, 2009 8:28 pm

I read this article and thought the experience shared was a good insight as I never had tuition myself all my life. This tuition culture may turn into a bigger issue in life later as this writer shared.

Tuition may help but it could turn into a crutch.
http://www.asiaone.com/News/Education/S ... 83141.html
Guest
 

Postby kiasimom » Wed Dec 02, 2009 4:51 am

DH was pointing out this article to me.
He says he is relieved that he sends DS and DD to Kumon as Kumon do not give them answers.
They require the children to think and not be reliant.

It is very true that almost every kids in Singapore has tuition in their life.
That is why I have cut down on tuiton for my two children.

I let them explore and answer the questions first.
I will only teach them if they really have a problem doing the questions.

kiasimom
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1526
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2009 3:01 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Guest » Wed Dec 02, 2009 9:53 am

Ya kiasimum, at some point, I believe all of us as parents have to know what we want for our children and wean them off. To be exam-smart and produce stellar results but lose the ability to have independent thinking and needing to be guided in virtually anything in life sounds like a recipe for disaster.

I believe lifeskills are more important things for us to assure that our children have before we leave them to fend for themselves as adults. Also discovery with unstructured learning will encourage creativity. It would be a shocking realisation for us to know in later years that the "tuition" generation can produce stellar results but cannot invent anything original. :!:

And it is interesting to note in this article that while able to get into law studies, he is still looking for some sort of help to assist him to study at tertiary level as it has already become a habit. During my time, tuition at uni is something unheard of! In my worse case scenario, I had willing boyfriends-to-be who would offer to help in my work, of which I had to consider seriously because of the payback I needed to compromise on. If I had been smarter then, perhaps I could have offered them tuition fees.... :lol: :lol: :lol:
Guest
 

Postby EN » Wed Dec 02, 2009 6:45 pm

I had tuition teacher when I was in primary 3 for math. Not sure why my mother sent me. Maybe because my math mark drops drastically from 99 to 78 or maybe the story of me being slapped, pinched, and hair pulled by the teacher has reached my mother’s ear. Anyway the tuition was short live for a few months only. Not sure why either.

I’ve gotten a science tuition teacher for my daughter when she was in primary 3. The tuition teacher was NUS undergraduate & she told me she is not capable of teaching my daughter. So, come primary 4, my daughter is sent to tuition centre instead. Final verdict: My daughter needs a tuition teacher and individual attention is meant for her only. I know I should move away from this mind set but my weird situation is like this.

My dd I suspect has ADD and uhmmm likely that she inherits it from her dearest mummy.

It’s like one minute I’m concentrating on what the teacher say, then wham I’m gone & back to the classroom when being called or whenever my mind wants to come back. It’s still happening today. Not sure how I do it, but I am still able to still obtain a decent grade or top the cohort for some subjects up to my university years. However in my dd case, she seems totally lost in her own world. I saw her drawings & there is tons of it. Unlike a writer who expresses her thoughts into writing, dd is expressing herself into drawings of fantasy world. Hence her earlier tuition teacher comments “I lost her” is a real spot on.

I am very sure she can pull a decent grade too if she can get the help that she needs. In class it is very difficult to follow through teacher’s teaching if the “space out” thing hit. The space out can be like 5 seconds to a good few minutes. Individual tuition should help to fill in the gap during her space out period. Both my husband and I have to pitch in to assist her too. We will continue to monitor until she is matured enough to study on her own.

I am not sure what kind of image I conjure with my sharing. First was on ds, then dd & now a bit about me. But believe me, in person we are as normal as can be :P

Anyway, back to this topic, I have nothing against having individual tuition or attending group tuition or enrichment for that matter. Everyone has different needs. Will attending tuition impact future ability to think independently? I really think it's highly dependent on an individual capability and attitude.

EN
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1108
Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2008 8:06 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Guest » Wed Dec 02, 2009 8:07 pm

En, your case seems to be an exception more than the norm.
While I agree that everyone is unique and different, the prolonged reliance on anyone for that matter when growing up, not just a tuition teacher, will turn out to be a crutch.

I suppose if kids are always doing things beyond their years here, then it is inevitable that they have to consult someone most of the time.

Anyway this is a vicious cycle that no immediate solution will help. Just thought it was interesting for a law undergrad to share this perspective which I would otherwise not be exposed to as I had no such experience.
Guest
 


Postby mintcc » Wed Dec 02, 2009 8:58 pm

EN wrote:I am not sure what kind of image I conjure with my sharing. First was on ds, then dd & now a bit about me. But believe me, in person we are as normal as can be :P



heee... wah, EN. You know what? I spaced out all the time when I am in secondary school, JC, university...and grad school too...esp when the contents of the lecture doesn't really interest me. So I know exactly what you mean. Of course, I have to pay for my spaced out periods by studying harder after lessons.

My 4 year old DS now spaced out all the time too when we are talking to him...hope that doesn't be as bad as my case when he got to primary school. And...yup I think we are normal :P

Ks2me, I agree that prolonged help may make the child too reliant. I had tuition for English and math since P3. But the most efficient learning I had is not during tuition but during self study.

mintcc
BlackBelt
BlackBelt
 
Posts: 880
Joined: Tue Sep 11, 2007 2:05 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Blobbi » Wed Dec 02, 2009 9:21 pm

Tks for the interesting read, ks2me. It is an eye opener.

I understand what you're saying -the bigger picture is that kids are doing academic work at levels that are higher than preceeding years, so they need help to do it. The trouble is, this is such a global movement that we as parents are powerless to stop it, except maybe to not get too caught up in it.

The reality is that (nearly?) all kids these days have some form of help, whether it's from home or from tuition centres. The question then is the extent of help. But some kids really need quite a lot of help to tide through. Even then, I think the saving grace is, and the author of the article is finding out, that at tertiary levels, there is no such thing as tuition. Everyone is at the same starting point. No matter how tuitioned the child was before, university is a baptism of fire - he has to learn to cope or he'll sink. And that is the critical point. Hopefully by that age, the kid is mature enough to think independently and be self motivated to work through difficulties, very much like how adults approach real life situations. Tuition as a crutch need not have a life long negative effect, because real life has a way of teaching us how to survive.

{Just in case, I am not a tuition teacher } :lol:

Blobbi
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1479
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 5:35 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Guest » Wed Dec 02, 2009 9:56 pm

Blobbi wrote: Tuition as a crutch need not have a life long negative effect, because real life has a way of teaching us how to survive.

{Just in case, I am not a tuition teacher } :lol:


That may also be true and it depends alot on a child's ability to adapt. So many other lifeskills are important to play an integral role of how a child eventually can manage life in a macro sense than just academic excellence alone. I can only wish the many kids out there that they are getting enough lifeskills vitamins other than just academic energy pump, then there will be less concern.

You sure you are not a tuition teacher? :? :lol:
Last edited by Guest on Wed Dec 02, 2009 9:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Guest
 

Postby joconde » Wed Dec 02, 2009 9:57 pm

Our education system is highly demanding and has low tolerance for failure therefore nobody wants to take a chance. How long can a parent afford to let the child struggle on his own before taking any action ?

joconde
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 251
Joined: Mon Dec 01, 2008 2:15 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Guest » Wed Dec 02, 2009 10:00 pm

joconde wrote:Our education system is highly demanding and has low tolerance for failure therefore nobody wants to take a chance. How long can a parent afford to let the child struggle on his own before taking any action ?


How about teaching the child how to learn? Somehow in the thick of all these activities, this is lost somewhere in the jungle....
Guest
 

Next

Return to Recess Time