Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

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Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby kiasimom » Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:11 pm

" Singapore is best in swimming in SEA."
That's what Mark said on 13th Dec 2009.

Do you think Singapore is getting better in sports or only in swimming and water-polo?

Who will be the next Joscelin Yeo? Tao Li or Quah Ting Wen?

If Quah Tingwen qualifies for the next Olympics, will Singaporeans be pleased if she wins a medal for Singapore? Will that make our fellow countrymen stop saying that Singapore has to depend on foreigners to win medals for Singapore?

How about table-tennis?
Is our team's performance better now?
Does that mean they should win more gold than before in SEA games?
After all, they won a Silver medal in Olympics?
Will Feng Tianwei take over Li Jiawei?

What is your view in Singapore's sports future?

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Re: Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby ChiefKiasu » Sun Dec 13, 2009 10:28 pm

kiasimom wrote:" Singapore is best in swimming in SEA."
That's what Mark said on 13th Dec 2009...


I have seen how Singaporean kids start as early as 3yo in preparing themselves to become future champions. I've seen parents bringing their pre-school kids in to swimming clubs to swim for 2hrs EVERY day. I've also seen kids as young as K2 swimming 50m freestyle in under 50s.

Yes, the future of Singapore's prowess in swimming remains extremely bright, assuming the kids don't burn out first.

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Postby kiasimom » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:01 am

Wow!
I am very impressed kids as young as K2 swimming 50m freestyle in under 50s. :!:

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Re: Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby Andaiz » Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:07 pm

ChiefKiasu wrote:
kiasimom wrote:" Singapore is best in swimming in SEA."
That's what Mark said on 13th Dec 2009...


I have seen how Singaporean kids start as early as 3yo in preparing themselves to become future champions. I've seen parents bringing their pre-school kids in to swimming clubs to swim for 2hrs EVERY day. I've also seen kids as young as K2 swimming 50m freestyle in under 50s.

Yes, the future of Singapore's prowess in swimming remains extremely bright, assuming the kids don't burn out first.


man, is this another of our hothousing outlets?! Are the kids even having a childhood? I remember Junie Sng (remember her?) once said in an interview that if it had not been her parents to "push" her in the early years, she'd not be where she was then. Possibly a little push in the right direction helps :wink:

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Postby kiasimom » Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:09 pm

If I am Quah Tingwen, I will say the same thing. i am grateful my coach and parents are supportive and push me to aim for the sky.

How about those who are pushed to the extremes but do not have the same accomplishments? There are many behind the scenes who sacrificed their childhood, but did not do well..
Sorry , digress a bit here :-)

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Re: Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby ChiefKiasu » Mon Dec 14, 2009 8:47 pm

Andaiz wrote:man, is this another of our hothousing outlets?! Are the kids even having a childhood? I remember Junie Sng (remember her?) once said in an interview that if it had not been her parents to "push" her in the early years, she'd not be where she was then. Possibly a little push in the right direction helps :wink:


In all honesty, I believe kids in China start their gymnastics training even younger and are pushed even harder. What I thought strange is that this activity is not known as "hot-housing", but rather "talent spotting" and "training". And why do we consider Singaporean parents that put their preschool kids on a stringent study regime to be kiasu while we watch the Chinese/Russian gymnasts in awe as they capture gold after gold at world events? Why this double standard?

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Re: Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby Guest » Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:14 pm

ChiefKiasu wrote:In all honesty, I believe kids in China start their gymnastics training even younger and are pushed even harder. What I thought strange is that this activity is not known as "hot-housing", but rather "talent spotting" and "training". And why do we consider Singaporean parents that put their preschool kids on a stringent study regime to be kiasu while we watch the Chinese/Russian gymnasts in awe as they capture gold after gold at world events? Why this double standard?


There is no double standard.
There is however a difference between "hot-housing" and "nurturing giftedness of any kind".

In sports, the talent has been confirmed by the professionals and this is typically a small sample and then send for rigorous training to unleash their potential from young. And this is just the way our body works, it has to be trained from very young age to retain its most extendable and flexible functions which is different from the brain development to some extent. There are more occurences of people excelling in academics at jc/university level (eg. history/geography/politics/social studies- we don't start these subjects since primary level) than people excelling in sports at university level if they start the sports in uni. Academic excellence for the majority is based on a combination of inborn traits and higher dependence on accumulation of learning processes over time(therein lies the maturity part) whereas sports excellence is based on inborn traits mainly and quite instinctive.

In academics, the path to train the talent is supposed to be GEP and the fact that MOE pushes it to Primary 4 already suggest that the maturity of the mind for academics would be later than for sports.

However, at preschool level now, all the so-called academic talents have been identified by the parents(not professionals hence the MASS involved) and sent for training by parents. So whether kids are truly gifted or not, they are all loaded with tonnes of information and learning methods and what have you....hence the term "hot-housing" in the hope that by P3 via the GEP test, they will be identified as 'gifted'. Most people actually do not know if their kids are truly talented in academics but they will take this path of assumption and try for the test in Primary 3 to get a confirmation. The outcome for parents is simply win-win, there is no harm because if gifted, they will get into GEP. If not, then at least they think they have given their kids a headstart academically even in the mainstream. What some parents fail to see is they cannot turn back the clock for the child if both do not work out in the end due to them neglecting the child's real needs. Also, by this very act, these parents are pushing their children to school to compete and perform, I hardly know children who go to school to learn anymore.....hence "Teach Less" is possible in schools and "Learn More" from enrichments/tuitions. :lol:
The number of parents doing this for academic far exceeds those training for sports because every kid needs to go to school to produce academic results but not every kid needs to produce excellent results in sports. Parents are also more willing to disengage when they see their kids not ready for physical activities but will not disengage and in fact hire more and more help if they see the brains cannot work up to their expectations. I am not sure if it is because physically it is easier to see their challenge since it is visible to the eyes but for the brain, is it a norm to believe what we cannot see as something very powerful? :|

Lastly, the spirit of sports is competitive, every game we play, we play to win, whether for fun or for trophy. However, in academics, it is not about winning, it is about learning so there is already a fundamental difference to begin with.
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Re: Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby ChiefKiasu » Mon Dec 14, 2009 11:36 pm

ks2me wrote:... In sports, the talent has been confirmed by the professionals and this is typically a small sample and then send for rigorous training to unleash their potential from young. And this is just the way our body works, it has to be trained from very young age to retain its most extendable and flexible functions which is different from the brain development to some extent. There are more occurences of people excelling in academics at jc/university level (eg. history/geography/politics/social studies- we don't start these subjects since primary level) than people excelling in sports at university level if they start the sports in uni. Academic excellence for the majority is based on a combination of inborn traits and higher dependence on accumulation of learning processes over time(therein lies the maturity part) whereas sports excellence is based on inborn traits mainly and quite instinctive...


I still don't see how developing the brain is different from developing the body. The brain is, after all, just another muscle. Use it and train it and it will do things that an untrained mind can never do. An untrained voice may never achieve the perfect pitch of a trained soprano on demand. Da Vinci may never become the astute artist he was if he didn't join the guild to study under a master craftsman. No. I still think we practice different standards when it comes to academic vs non-academic achievements. As you noted, we all believe academic excellence is much more important than the non-academic "stuff" or extra-curricular activities. So we are willing to push our kids to study while relaxing on our demands when it comes to making them exercise. Strangely, though, we tend to lambast other parents for making their kids study too much even if the kids obviously enjoy the learning process due to their innate talents, while closing an eye on those that push their kids to excel in physical sports, music, or art.

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Re: Is Singapore getting better in sports achievement?

Postby Guest » Tue Dec 15, 2009 12:52 am

ChiefKiasu wrote:I still don't see how developing the brain is different from developing the body. The brain is, after all, just another muscle. Use it and train it and it will do things that an untrained mind can never do. An untrained voice may never achieve the perfect pitch of a trained soprano on demand. Da Vinci may never become the astute artist he was if he didn't join the guild to study under a master craftsman. No. I still think we practice different standards when it comes to academic vs non-academic achievements. As you noted, we all believe academic excellence is much more important than the non-academic "stuff" or extra-curricular activities. So we are willing to push our kids to study while relaxing on our demands when it comes to making them exercise. Strangely, though, we tend to lambast other parents for making their kids study too much even if the kids obviously enjoy the learning process due to their innate talents, while closing an eye on those that push their kids to excel in physical sports, music, or art.


I am not capable of explaining to you in expert terms on the difference but one fundamental difference is the body declines with age and brain power increases with usage over time for a normal person.

The key here is we are talking about different things. You assume all things being equal, i.e. talented brain kids being trained at preschool = talented sports kids being trained in preschool, hence there should be no double standards in how they should be viewed. The reality is talented or not talented, kids are being "trained" academically at preschool at high speed with no brakes, only when kids scream I guess. However, when it comes to sports, only the talented get to be pushed harder because the pushing factor is not only the parents but the coaches. However, if the coaches or teachers see no potential in the kid after realisation, the kid will be dropped like a 'hot potato'. Why? because cannot send for competition, then they will just train normally, they will NOT be allowed for intensive training. Academic has no such ruling.
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Postby kiasimom » Tue Dec 15, 2009 5:11 pm

I have given up hope on our Singapore soccer team!

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