Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow up

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Jennifer
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by Jennifer » Mon Jun 04, 2018 7:27 am

IP teachers do not spoon feed.
If the child is used to primary school teachers' style of spoon feeding, then of course the child sees the IP teacher as not doing a proper job of teaching. The problem actually lies with the child, not the IP teacher. Then the child requests for tuition assistance. Why is the child/ parent finger pointing at IP teacher?

Zappy
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by Zappy » Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:24 am

MrsKiasu wrote:Read story books can do so much help arh? I m happy then that dd starts to get interested in those thicker Eng storybooks. Hope to be able to pull her standard up abit :pray:
Just go to our NLB - tonnes of nice books there from EL/ CL teenage to adult.
With the double-loan program for the school holidays, should be more than enough to read these few weeks. Instead of buying then read a couple of times. Many of the books in libraries like Library@Orchard are really new too.

LucyL
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by LucyL » Mon Jun 04, 2018 8:59 am

"Singapore is a great place for children to grow up with good access to high quality education and medical care services, while also being one of the safest countries in the world. Threats to childhood that plague other countries - like early marriage, poor access to education and war - simply don't exist in Singapore, or at extremely low levels."

MrsKiasu
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by MrsKiasu » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:01 am

Zappy wrote:
MrsKiasu wrote:Read story books can do so much help arh? I m happy then that dd starts to get interested in those thicker Eng storybooks. Hope to be able to pull her standard up abit :pray:
Just go to our NLB - tonnes of nice books there from EL/ CL teenage to adult.
With the double-loan program for the school holidays, should be more than enough to read these few weeks. Instead of buying then read a couple of times. Many of the books in libraries like Library@Orchard are really new too.
Thanks Zappy, will try ths place..maybe I just allow dd to borrow 'better' books.

lee_yl
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by lee_yl » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:24 am

Jennifer wrote:IP teachers do not spoon feed.
If the child is used to primary school teachers' style of spoon feeding, then of course the child sees the IP teacher as not doing a proper job of teaching. The problem actually lies with the child, not the IP teacher. Then the child requests for tuition assistance. Why is the child/ parent finger pointing at IP teacher?
I agree that secondary school students shouldn’t be spoon fed. However, the process of letting go the holding hand should be carefully managed to ensure that the child is able to cope and not just adopt a swim-or-drown strategy.

A Sec 1 pupil in January was still a primary school kid in December. Child doesn’t miraculously transform overnight to be able to cope with IP secondary school expectations without training and time to adapt.

By adopting a lassiez faire regime, the IP schools are inadvertently entrenching “academic aristocracy”, only those with the means and support network will be able to strive


mummychua
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by mummychua » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:49 am

actually education in all asian countries are stressful. I asked my friends in Taiwan, China and Malaysia, all of them have lots of tuition for their kids. even my friend who migrate to Australia cant help herself from buying a property that is within a good school zone.

to mitigate the stress, parents will need to be more bo chap. for myself i try my best to let my dd progress on her own, no tuition, but i do ask her to do assessment books from time to time to assess her learning. so far so good. although i do get stressed when she come back with less than ideal result. always got to remind myself to look at the effort she put in rather than the marks. still it is very hard when all parents talked about out the school gate is tuition and marks.

laughingcat
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by laughingcat » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:54 am

true.....The teachers must still hold the fort and realm for Sec 1 students. Perhaps letting go probably in mid year 1?

Some kids just take time to bloom especially between the transition of Primary school to Sec 1. And some still happen to be 12 years old. Worse Sec school is a totally different arena with different expectation and more subjects.

ammonite
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by ammonite » Mon Jun 04, 2018 9:58 am

In the past when tuition was a rarity, I believe everyone was left to swim - or drown? Or the teaching pace and level just adjusted to the majority of the cohort?
If everyone wants to be the top 10 percent and is willing to fight to the finishing line, naturally there will be multiple casualties.

Jennifer
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by Jennifer » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:05 am

lee_yl wrote:
Jennifer wrote:IP teachers do not spoon feed.
If the child is used to primary school teachers' style of spoon feeding, then of course the child sees the IP teacher as not doing a proper job of teaching. The problem actually lies with the child, not the IP teacher. Then the child requests for tuition assistance. Why is the child/ parent finger pointing at IP teacher?
I agree that secondary school students shouldn’t be spoon fed. However, the process of letting go the holding hand should be carefully managed to ensure that the child is able to cope and not just adopt a swim-or-drown strategy.

A Sec 1 pupil in January was still a primary school kid in December. Child doesn’t miraculously transform overnight to be able to cope with IP secondary school expectations without training and time to adapt.

By adopting a lassiez faire regime, the IP schools are inadvertently entrenching “academic aristocracy”, only those with the means and support network will be able to strive
When is the right time to let go?
Who is the party responsible for letting go? Parents/Child or school teacher?

Some months ago, we met with elder boy's primary school form teacher and his friend at a neighbourhood food centre. The friend is a teacher at a polytechnic. He is actually worried with the current generation of youngsters as many are not independent learners even at the age of entering polytechnic. Yes, he knows some of his students are getting tuition lessons.

For my boys, I let go when they were in primary school. Both needed to attend HMT tuition only post primary school.
Elder boy strives very well (as he is interested to deepen/acquire knowledge), whereas ah boy is only getting by with minimal efforts (he is contended to be ranked as an average student).

I do not know which IP school your child is in.
Does the school teacher really do not teach at all during normal school lessons?
When is the Parents-Teachers meeting?

Mine was/is in NJC.
I have never heard from my boys' complaints that the school teacher(s) does/do not teach.

ammonite
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Re: Singapore the world’s best country for children to grow

Post by ammonite » Mon Jun 04, 2018 10:06 am

mummychua wrote:actually education in all asian countries are stressful. I asked my friends in Taiwan, China and Malaysia, all of them have lots of tuition for their kids. even my friend who migrate to Australia cant help herself from buying a property that is within a good school zone.
Of course. What everyone wants is less stress, no tuition, but their children can still be the top 1-10 percent in school, so that they can be in the top 1 -10 percent income level eventually. If you tell them no stress but drop to the lower middle strata, I think they rather have the stress.

But if you have an economy where wage difference is minimal among different jobs and ranks, that is when you will se people starting to think that it is not worth spending so much on tuition/grades because there isn’t much pay off for income level.

So another question is what kind of society and economy do we want, and what type of economy can we realistically have?

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