Is this a need?

Looking to grow that little Mozart or Chloe to their full potential? Find out how others are doing it here.

Is this a need?

Postby msrq » Sun Jun 09, 2013 6:34 pm

Hello fellow parents,

I am seriously considering whether I should send my child for classes on fine arts (eg singing,piano) like these. Like every other parent, I want my child to have many talents and to be well-rounded. My own parents sent me to piano classes and the likes but a general observation (for other kids back then and even now) is, the most it went was to develop into a small little habit. We want our child to do well for PSLE, O lvl, A lvl, go to uni.

We want them to be good in all the relevant subjects, english, maths, science, then the question comes...by sending them to these classes, wouldnt it be a waste of time and money? (assuming they do not have an interest or have no opinions about it,you send them for it,dont send them for it they dont mind) Because ultimately there isnt much market for fine arts like these, we will all aim for our children to be a white collar worker.

I'm not debating whether fine arts is a need, but rather, how willing are you to send your child to pursue this aspect knowing that it wouldnt contribute that much to his/her future?

msrq
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 5:59 pm
Total Likes: 0


Re: Is this a need?

Postby mathtuition88 » Sun Jun 09, 2013 7:02 pm

msrq wrote:Hello fellow parents,

I am seriously considering whether I should send my child for classes on fine arts (eg singing,piano) like these. Like every other parent, I want my child to have many talents and to be well-rounded. My own parents sent me to piano classes and the likes but a general observation (for other kids back then and even now) is, the most it went was to develop into a small little habit. We want our child to do well for PSLE, O lvl, A lvl, go to uni.

We want them to be good in all the relevant subjects, english, maths, science, then the question comes...by sending them to these classes, wouldnt it be a waste of time and money? (assuming they do not have an interest or have no opinions about it,you send them for it,dont send them for it they dont mind) Because ultimately there isnt much market for fine arts like these, we will all aim for our children to be a white collar worker.

I'm not debating whether fine arts is a need, but rather, how willing are you to send your child to pursue this aspect knowing that it wouldnt contribute that much to his/her future?


Maybe the fine arts classes can be incorporated into CCA. For example, my sister learnt violin, and for CCA she chose String Ensemble. Since CCA is compulsory anyway, I guess this is a way to "kill two birds with one stone". The child will have fine arts education, and fulfil the CCA requirement.
Of course, interest is the most important. Sports and uniformed groups make a good CCA also, depending on the temperament of the child.

Personally, I learnt piano. Unfortunately, piano is hard to be incorporated into CCA (other than choir piano accompaniment, or others) as it is a solo instrument. But I am still grateful that my parents sent me for piano lessons. I play the piano for church now.

Sincerely hope this information helps.

Best wishes,
http://mathtuition88.com/
(Small Group Tuition to start in 2014)

mathtuition88
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1830
Joined: Thu Apr 25, 2013 9:42 pm
Total Likes: 10


Re: Is this a need?

Postby ngl2010 » Sun Jun 09, 2013 8:37 pm

We exposed DS to piano and painting when young. He clearly has no talent in those so we quit painting after 3 months. We continued piano because research shows playing musical instrument helps brain development and also we want him to use piano as his relaxation channel. DS is P6 now and had passed grade 8. He no longer has piano classes. Nowadays he plays new age music at home to relax and he enjoys it. Maybe in Secondary school he will learn jazz piano for fun. It will be up to him.

He may or may not use the skills to earn a living in the future (he still needs to do diploma if he wants to teach) but we feel it is rewarding enough as we can enjoy live music from time to time at home now :boogie:

ngl2010
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 6029
Joined: Tue May 24, 2011 2:03 pm
Total Likes: 68


Re: Is this a need?

Postby fable » Sun Jun 09, 2013 8:50 pm

how willing are you to send your child to pursue this aspect knowing that it wouldnt contribute that much to his/her future?


I have a somewhat different perspective. Its not just developing monetary returns on their talents or marketable skills. I would like my child to grow up into a person with interests and passions, someone who cares for his family and people around him, and who is willing to work for what he wants to achieve. To me, letting my child explore interests in music, arts, sports etc achieves a couple of things:
- it gives him different avenues to develop his talents. Perhaps he is not cut out to be a doctor or a lawyer but would love acting or dancing or singing. The world has room for more than just 'white collar workers'
- it teaches him discipline and delayed gratification, because if you want to be good at any sport or instrument, you need to practice, you need to face and overcome failures, you need to have patience
- it gives him a stronger sense of self and self-identity; pride in himself for something he is able to do, of who he is. I think if you are proud of yourself you are less likely to succumb to peer pressure
- it gives him something that he enjoys doing, something outside of schoolwork that will be the focus of so many years of his life. Hopefully this also will become a healthy way for him to deal with stress. Instead of turning to food or tv or computer games, he'll run or play the piano or something like that.
- it shows him different ways of looking at things, lets him meet people from places outside of school or the playground, gives him a greater awareness of life

To me these are all good reasons to introduce fine arts & just other activities to our kids. The challenge to me is how much to push them in these areas. Because on the one hand if they don't enjoy it then whats the point, but on the other, if they don't work at something enough they won't know if they enjoy it or not! So I only sign my son up for something that he has expressed interest in, and he has to commit to it for a period of time (which means attend the classes, and practice without complaint, and pay attention when he's there). I don't want him to become a dilettante, trying out all sorts of things with no staying power.

fable
GreenBelt
GreenBelt
 
Posts: 157
Joined: Wed Apr 01, 2009 9:28 am
Total Likes: 6


Re: Is this a need?

Postby waiyean » Mon Jun 10, 2013 4:30 pm

Hi msrq,
I think most parents send their kids to music lessons not expecting them to have a career in music. Most of the time, they want to cultivate a passion for music in the child, and that probably stemmed from the fact that they love music as well. It would have been very sad had Mozart's father stopped him from learning music just because musicians then are mostly paupers.

Furthermore, there have been countless number of studies that shows that learning music boost the intelligence in kids. Also, there are various other non academic related skills that can be developed through learning music, some of which has been detailed by fable above.

Can't really comment on whether there is a market for fine arts in future. I think the world we are living in is constantly changing. What I do know is that I will support my child to pursue this aspect as much as I can, as long as she is interested. Whether it contributes to her future is irrelevant.

waiyean
BrownBelt
BrownBelt
 
Posts: 683
Joined: Tue Jan 03, 2012 4:51 pm
Total Likes: 6



Re: Is this a need?

Postby sleepy » Mon Jun 10, 2013 5:08 pm

msrq wrote: how willing are you to send your child to pursue this aspect knowing that it wouldnt contribute that much to his/her future?


It's a yes and no for me. During preschool and lower primary years, when kids generally have more time to spare, I don't mind letting them indulge in a time consuming hobby such as learning music.

My dd2 started learning piano at 5 years old. I have no idea how music would contribute to her future. It's her interests and I'm willing to support. However, my priority has always been clear. If there is time constraint (there is afterall only 24 hours a day & time management is an over-rated myth :evil: ) music will have to take a back seat versus academic.

I told my dd2 who is in p3 now that I will not be signing her for graded exam after mid year in p5. She has to prioritise her studies by then. Not suggesting that she has to stop playing piano, just no more graded exam after that cut off date.

She's kind of motivated to complete her grade 8 asap (learning grade 7 now) Her personal goal. I didn't exactly ask her to finish up grade 8 by p5. I only told her to shift her priority by p5 so whatever piano grade she reaches then, we will just kiv exam.

She knew that I'm serious. Because I asked dd1 to kiv her cello. It's on hold now. With dd1's hectic schedule, there's obviously no spare time for daily practice. No point adding more stress. I rather she sleeps earlier

Bottomline, music is a want, not a need, in my opinion :wink:

sleepy
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 9075
Joined: Thu Aug 14, 2008 6:21 pm
Total Likes: 34


Re: Is this a need?

Postby metz » Mon Jun 10, 2013 7:04 pm

msrq wrote:
We want them to be good in all the relevant subjects, english, maths, science, then the question comes...by sending them to these classes, wouldnt it be a waste of time and money? (assuming they do not have an interest or have no opinions about it,you send them for it,dont send them for it they dont mind) Because ultimately there isnt much market for fine arts like these, we will all aim for our children to be a white collar worker.


Somehow, it has become a 'need' for some parents. It depends very much on your own beliefs. I have come across a child who failed grade 2 and grade 3 abrsm piano exams. The parent insisted that he continues with the instrument. He managed to clear grade 5 this year and the parent is now targeting for him to take grade 8 next year in P5. Reason - the parent wanted him to concentrate fully on his PSLE in P6.

I'm not debating whether fine arts is a need, but rather, how willing are you to send your child to pursue this aspect knowing that it wouldnt contribute that much to his/her future?

How this would contribute to the child's future, I have no idea. Perhaps, it looks good on paper when applying for DSA?

Whatever the reason is, enrolling their young ones for music classes has become a trend among many parents. For some, it has even evolved into an 'obsession' to plan for their children to clear grade 8 (or even diploma) by P6 or earlier and they are willing to go to great lengths to achieve that, even if the child has no particular interest in the instrument.
metz
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1629
Joined: Mon Jul 28, 2008 2:38 pm
Total Likes: 4


Re: Is this a need?

Postby Dreamaurora » Mon Jun 10, 2013 11:10 pm

msrq wrote:Hello fellow parents,

I am seriously considering whether I should send my child for classes on fine arts (eg singing,piano) like these. Like every other parent, I want my child to have many talents and to be well-rounded. My own parents sent me to piano classes and the likes but a general observation (for other kids back then and even now) is, the most it went was to develop into a small little habit. We want our child to do well for PSLE, O lvl, A lvl, go to uni.

We want them to be good in all the relevant subjects, english, maths, science, then the question comes...by sending them to these classes, wouldnt it be a waste of time and money? (assuming they do not have an interest or have no opinions about it,you send them for it,dont send them for it they dont mind) Because ultimately there isnt much market for fine arts like these, we will all aim for our children to be a white collar worker.

I'm not debating whether fine arts is a need, but rather, how willing are you to send your child to pursue this aspect knowing that it wouldnt contribute that much to his/her future?


There are very good replies here, but I just would like to add a point about expecting our children to be a white collar worker. My parents were very adamant about this and pushed me very hard to be stellar academically. I have always loved classical music ever since young and have begged them for music lessons countless times only to be refused brusquely because it is for sissies and not practical.

When I decided to become a musician after picking up the piano myself when I was a teenager it caused a lot of resentment and there were a few years when I stopped talking altogether to my parents. It was perhaps a very stupid decision pursuing a career in music as I started very late (I started piano when I was 17) and I had to compete with much younger people with better instructions and resources. But I did not regret it at all as I could not imagine my life otherwise. I understand how painful it is to be denied doing something I truly loved and I would not let my children experience the same.

Dreamaurora
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2050
Joined: Thu Apr 07, 2011 12:15 am
Total Likes: 34


Re: Is this a need?

Postby msrq » Tue Jun 11, 2013 1:18 pm

fellow parents,

for fine arts classes,how did you guys search for them? through word of mouth? websites? advertisements which include banners and posters?

msrq
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
 
Posts: 6
Joined: Sun Jun 09, 2013 5:59 pm
Total Likes: 0


Re: Is this a need?

Postby sleepy » Tue Jun 11, 2013 2:16 pm

msrq wrote:fellow parents,

for fine arts classes,how did you guys search for them? through word of mouth? websites? advertisements which include banners and posters?


Nafa

sleepy
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 9075
Joined: Thu Aug 14, 2008 6:21 pm
Total Likes: 34


Next

Return to Music, Singing, Dancing, Speech & Drama