All About Fencing

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All About Fencing

Postby admin » Tue Sep 04, 2007 11:56 am

Here is a list of fencing schools/clubs in Singapore:

Absolute Fencing Club

Blade Club

Duxton Plain Fencing Club

Fencing Masters http://www.fencingmasters.com/web/index.php
- Located at the Pan Malayan Warehouse, 177 Ubi Avenue 4, Singapore 408792 (near the Comfort Driving Centre)
- $600 for 10 lessons for junior students above 6 years old

ITE Balestier

NTU Fencing Club

NUS Fencing Club

King Edward VII Hall Fencing Club

Nanyang Polytechnic Fencing Club

Ngee Ann Polytechnic Fencing Club

Z-Fencing http://www.zfencing.com.sg
- Located in Balmoral Plaza, United Square Shopping Mall, Parkway Parade
- Fees depend on grade level

Fencing Singapore http://www.fencingsingapore.org.sg/
- Association of local fencing clubs
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YMCA

Postby ChiefKiasu » Thu Oct 11, 2007 12:44 pm

Seems like YMCA is offering fencing for children from 6-12 years old. Rates seem to be very competitive at $100 per lesson.

Check it out here.

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Postby super_dad » Sat Dec 22, 2007 11:48 am

What are the things that you would need to buy for this? (attire, sword?, face mask? bandaid? :P)

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Postby ChiefKiasu » Sat Dec 22, 2007 12:24 pm

super_dad wrote:What are the things that you would need to buy for this? (attire, sword?, face mask? bandaid? :P)


There's quite a large investment in the multiple layers of protection and clothing the kid has to put on to avoid the bandaids. Other than the t-shirt they were, there are 4 more layers on top protecting the body. But occasionally there could be accidental hits on the arms and legs that result in small bruises.

The equipment comes in the form of "German-made" (expensive) and "China-made" (read - more affordable for mortals like us). Still the cheapest package costs a hefty $500 odd.

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Postby super_dad » Mon Dec 24, 2007 8:09 am

$500...wow. But logical, since this sport is quite a specialized one.

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Postby phantom » Wed Dec 26, 2007 11:50 am

Compare to those judo and other martial arts which is much cheaper, what does fencing offers that are different from those?

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Postby ChiefKiasu » Wed Dec 26, 2007 1:17 pm

phantom wrote:Compare to those judo and other martial arts which is much cheaper, what does fencing offers that are different from those?


I guess it's kind of like golf versus hockey. It is a weapons sport, so you need to compare it with things like kendo. It is not a contact sport like judo, but still requires a substantial level of physical endurance with all the leg work. You need to focus all the time. With electrical fencing, it is really like navigating in a mine field... one wrong move and you lose a point to the opponent. There is a lot of strategy and mind games going on... you need to learn your opponent's strengths and weakness quickly and adapt on the fly. Lots of probes, feints, scare tactics, plots within a plot stuff. You choose if you wish to attack or defend. Fencing is one of the very few sports where both men and women can compete as equals.

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Postby phantom » Fri Dec 28, 2007 9:47 am

ChiefKiasu wrote:I guess it's kind of like golf versus hockey. It is a weapons sport, so you need to compare it with things like kendo. It is not a contact sport like judo, but still requires a substantial level of physical endurance with all the leg work. You need to focus all the time. With electrical fencing, it is really like navigating in a mine field... one wrong move and you lose a point to the opponent. There is a lot of strategy and mind games going on... you need to learn your opponent's strengths and weakness quickly and adapt on the fly. Lots of probes, feints, scare tactics, plots within a plot stuff. You choose if you wish to attack or defend. Fencing is one of the very few sports where both men and women can compete as equals.


I know fencing have lots of sparring during training. Does the kid get injured easily during such sparring session?

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Postby ChiefKiasu » Sun Dec 30, 2007 11:24 pm

phantom wrote:I know fencing have lots of sparring during training. Does the kid get injured easily during such sparring session?


Hard to get hurt if you are wearing that many layers of protection. The head mask is made of steel, and provides protection for the neck. The only time my son got bruised was in his competition last month when his opponent hit him on his arm, and that was the first after almost a couple of years of fencing.

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Postby super_dad » Fri Jan 04, 2008 11:54 am

ChiefKiasu wrote:
phantom wrote:I know fencing have lots of sparring during training. Does the kid get injured easily during such sparring session?


Hard to get hurt if you are wearing that many layers of protection. The head mask is made of steel, and provides protection for the neck. The only time my son got bruised was in his competition last month when his opponent hit him on his arm, and that was the first after almost a couple of years of fencing.


Just wondering...is the long skinny sword (whatever you call it), sharp and pointy?

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