All About Fencing

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Essential
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Re: All About Fencing

Post by Essential » Sat Nov 03, 2018 3:29 pm

Hi ,
Pm me if u need preloved fencing items like shoe ...

CarenL
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Re: All About Fencing

Post by CarenL » Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:51 am

We are eyeing for Modern Fencing Academy.. any feedback from them? I'd love to hear all your thoughts. Thank you!

zac's mum
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Re: All About Fencing

Post by zac's mum » Fri Jun 14, 2019 12:46 pm

CarenL wrote:
Fri Jun 14, 2019 10:51 am
We are eyeing for Modern Fencing Academy.. any feedback from them? I'd love to hear all your thoughts. Thank you!
We went there for one of their open house events. The venue is big and clean, customer service was friendly and good. I noticed the coaches can be quite strict at times.

A suggestion: if you are undecided, feel free to request a trial lesson. Some places may require a trial fee, but that’s fine in my eyes as I get to observe and evaluate the coach’s training and engagement style with my kid. If you never get to try first, it’s hard to commit a whole term’s fees just like that.

serene101
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Re: All About Fencing

Post by serene101 » Wed Jul 03, 2019 12:01 pm

zac's mum wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:52 pm
Just sharing here in case other parents are trying to decide if Fencing would be a suitable sport for their child. Compiled from my ~1 year of observing lessons.

Fencing is suitable for those kids who are:
- agile and nimble on their feet
- have quick reflexes
- have sharp eyesight (I have never seen bespectacled fencers but the coach tells me there are, and they need to get narrower-framed glasses which can fit under the mask)
- strict rule followers and yet have creativity to improvise strategy on-the-go
- height, shape or gender are of no particular advantage/disadvantage in this sport, unlike many other sports

So if your child has these attributes, it’s worth giving it a try. Otherwise, it’s probably money down the drain. :siam:

You can go and observe for free btw. TPY Safra 4th floor. Viewing gallery for the public every weekend lol.
hi.. you said fencing is suitable for kids who are "strict rule followers and yet have creativity to improvise strategy on-the-go".. Can you advise if you did see your child improve in this area? does this skill transfer to other aspects of life?

zac's mum
KiasuGrandMaster
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Re: All About Fencing

Post by zac's mum » Wed Jul 03, 2019 12:33 pm

serene101 wrote:
Wed Jul 03, 2019 12:01 pm
zac's mum wrote:
Sun Jun 10, 2018 7:52 pm
Just sharing here in case other parents are trying to decide if Fencing would be a suitable sport for their child. Compiled from my ~1 year of observing lessons.

Fencing is suitable for those kids who are:
- agile and nimble on their feet
- have quick reflexes
- have sharp eyesight (I have never seen bespectacled fencers but the coach tells me there are, and they need to get narrower-framed glasses which can fit under the mask)
- strict rule followers and yet have creativity to improvise strategy on-the-go
- height, shape or gender are of no particular advantage/disadvantage in this sport, unlike many other sports

So if your child has these attributes, it’s worth giving it a try. Otherwise, it’s probably money down the drain. :siam:

You can go and observe for free btw. TPY Safra 4th floor. Viewing gallery for the public every weekend lol.
hi.. you said fencing is suitable for kids who are "strict rule followers and yet have creativity to improvise strategy on-the-go".. Can you advise if you did see your child improve in this area? does this skill transfer to other aspects of life?
Hi...I’m not sure what you mean by did he improve...cos his nature was already like that. It wasn’t cultivated by his fencing training.

Conversely, some kids do not like to obey the coach’s instructions. Or they dislike repetitive steps in training eg keep doing the same exercises x10 to build strength & stamina. Or they don’t see the point of dressing up every single time in all those multiple layers of fencing clothes for safety...such kids are not suited for fencing IMO. To elaborate...in fencing, the movements are extremely precise, more than any other sport or martial art. The placing of the feet needs to be at that certain angle, the lunge needs to be practised over and over again, the arm hand must be able to aim & hit at the precise target area. The child should enjoy (not just tolerate) such “drilling” kind of repetition exercises.

At the other end, there are other kids, maybe too rigid rule followers, who cannot think or see outside the box. They may get all the technical skills, but cannot apply them during competitions when the opponent may throw a dozen different tactics to mess with your brain. Such kids also cannot progress very far...


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