All About Competitive Swimming

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All About Competitive Swimming

Postby workingmom » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:12 am

Hi

I am seriously considering getting my DD (Pri 2) involved in competitive swimming. I was told it is very time-consuming. Can parents with primary school children who are in competitive swimming please share your experience in coping with training and school work ? Is swimming at least 5 times a week a must (or even more) for lower primary kids ? DD currently is doing well academically and she is also doing piano so I am afraid the intensive training may affect her work and piano time. However, I feel she should excel in a sport and she is enjoying her weekly lessons.

Also, will she need to master all strokes before she can swim for the swim clubs ? DD has not really been taught the back/butterfly but based on her recent swim times we believe she has potential.

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Re: Competitive Swimming

Postby Guest » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:18 am

workingmom wrote:Hi

I am seriously considering getting my DD (Pri 2) involved in competitive swimming. I was told it is very time-consuming. Can parents with primary school children who are in competitive swimming please share your experience in coping with training and school work ? Is swimming at least 5 times a week a must (or even more) for lower primary kids ? DD currently is doing well academically and she is also doing piano so I am afraid the intensive training may affect her work and piano time. However, I feel she should excel in a sport and she is enjoying her weekly lessons.

Also, will she need to master all strokes before she can swim for the swim clubs ? DD has not really been taught the back/butterfly but based on her recent swim times we believe she has potential.


My ex-coach wanted to start a class for competitive swimming but I am not sure if he did indeed start the class eventually because by then, my boys have completed their swimming lessons and have stopped taking swimming lessons with him. If you want, I can give you his phone number, maybe you can ask him more about training schedule, advice etc, but be warned, he hardly picks up the phone as he is at the pool almost everyday from 8am to 8pm, but he usually tells us to sms him for any issues and he would try his best to revert as and when he has the time. Let me know if you are interested, I will PM you his number.
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Postby workingmom » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:23 am

Thanks 25hourmaid but I have a swim club in mind recommended by my daughter's current coach who does not really teach competitive swimming although she has been training my daughter - I just want to find out how grueling the schedule is and how often are the training sessions and the committment required. Don't know if DD can take it...and if it means putting her other interests aside she may not want to.

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Postby MMM » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:24 am

I've a friend who is coaching school teams and it appears that he also attends those national swim meets,etc... If you are interested, you can pm me.

Off topic, do you have concerns if your dd really train for competitive swimming, she will end up with really broad shoulders or manly physique???

I used to love swimming during my school days and frankly as a result of swimming, I've broad shoulders. It's structural and it can't be change. That's why I always thought to myself that for my dds, it's good that they are able to swim and survive that's all.

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Postby Guest » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:25 am

workingmom wrote:Thanks 25hourmaid but I have a swim club in mind recommended by my daughter's current coach who does not really teach competitive swimming although she has been training my daughter - I just want to find out how grueling the schedule is and how often are the training sessions and the committment required. Don't know if DD can take it...and if it means putting her other interests aside she may not want to.


No problem, in that case, then I suggest talking to the swimming club to find out more before you make the decision. Good luck! :lol:
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Postby workingmom » Thu Feb 11, 2010 10:31 am

MMM wrote:I've a friend who is coaching school teams and it appears that he also attends those national swim meets,etc... If you are interested, you can pm me.

Off topic, do you have concerns if your dd really train for competitive swimming, she will end up with really broad shoulders or manly physique???

I used to love swimming during my school days and frankly as a result of swimming, I've broad shoulders. It's structural and it can't be change. That's why I always thought to myself that for my dds, it's good that they are able to swim and survive that's all.


Yah, am concerned about that plus the fact that the swimmers are all so dark - already swim 1 hr twice a wk and DD is quite tanned. Currently DD skinny n tall so can't really say she will turn out later to be very muscular.
But I think getting her to excel in the sport gives her some excitement & purpose in her life and she seems to enjoy participating in the recent school meet so....at a cross-roads lah :?

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Postby BigDevil » Thu Feb 11, 2010 12:55 pm

The following is taken from the Swimming thread. Hope it gives you some idea...and perhaps you can ask Chief about it.

ChiefKiasu wrote:
lizawa wrote:Hi ChiefKiasu,

Is your son still in competitive swimming ? how is he coping with the training and school work ?

If he can compete at the Primary School national level, he will stand a good chance to get into one of the IP schools through DSA.


Oh.. I stopped him when he started P1... it was too competitive and I can't afford to keep bringing him for his training sessions EVERY day. Kind of a waste since he was pretty good then - he could swim all strokes, and faster than me when he was K2. But he was also losing interest due to the intensity. He's still doing it once a week, but that is definitely not enough for competitive swimming.

He's into fencing now, since K2. He's got lots of interest in that, and not too bad at it too. Wonder if that would qualify him for DSA too?

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To swim or not to swim competitively?

Postby 2ppaamm » Wed Feb 17, 2010 11:46 pm

Competitive swimming is not for everybody. It is about you against yourself. There is no opponent in the pool. Your aim is to move your body faster and faster with every practise or competition. Your opponent? The clock.

What I like about Singapore competitive swimming:
1. It is an established sport, and the funding is good. So if your kid becomes really good and has a chance the represent Singapore, he gets a lot of goodies and support.

2. There are abundant good coaches all over Singapore, you can pick and choose who you want.

3. Singapore promotes Swimming, and therefore, there are many competitions for swimmers to hone their skills.

4. Disciplines the mind. At the highest level in Singapore, swimmers train 11 to 13 times a week, including Upper Primary kids.

5. The sport that will cause the least injury. Well, looks like it to me!

6. Many good IP secondary schools take good swimmers for DSA, but you have to be really good, just like any other sports.

7. With a good competitive swimming background, you can excel in many other sports, like water polo, synchronized swimming, triathlon, biathlon. Many ex-swimmers go on and become state representatives in these sports.

What I do not like:

1. There's no team. Your kid will not get to learn how synergy works.

2. Very competitive parents. Who like to compare and compare their kids. Like any sport, you win some and lose some. If you are the kind of parent who want to win all the time.... er you will not like swimming. Also, please don't brag. Tak boleh tahan!

3. The long, long hours. Kids get very tired. I believe our swimmers burn out too early. In overseas competitions, our Under12 shine. After than, it's a downhill.

4. Over pushy training. If your kid is below 10, please don't push them to do 7 km a day. It will cause injury. Unfortunately, many parents push their kids to join the older kids in the hope of reaching a faster time. Coaches have told me that they are causing injuries to their own kids. But the coaches will always oblige, because they know that if they don't another coach in another club will. So let your head be on your shoulders, and not your pride.

5. Your child will grow at least 7 shades darker, and have broader shoulders and become really sporty.

6. Good swimmers are mostly wimps on land. But you will likely see this only after the kid is well into his/her teens.

7. They retire too early. As early as 18, they will want to retire. Seems to be the trend in Singapore, and I think it is strange.

So, not only must you hone your skills, in swimming, you have to make sure the body is in good shape as well. If you allow it to slag, you will be dragging a burden across the pool. Discipline, diet, sleep and habit becomes part and parcel of the game.

Hope this helps you make a informed decision. :celebrate:

2ppaamm
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Postby 2ppaamm » Wed Feb 17, 2010 11:54 pm

BigDevil wrote:The following is taken from the Swimming thread. Hope it gives you some idea...and perhaps you can ask Chief about it.

ChiefKiasu wrote:
lizawa wrote:Hi ChiefKiasu,

Is your son still in competitive swimming ? how is he coping with the training and school work ?

If he can compete at the Primary School national level, he will stand a good chance to get into one of the IP schools through DSA.


Oh.. I stopped him when he started P1... it was too competitive and I can't afford to keep bringing him for his training sessions EVERY day. Kind of a waste since he was pretty good then - he could swim all strokes, and faster than me when he was K2. But he was also losing interest due to the intensity. He's still doing it once a week, but that is definitely not enough for competitive swimming.

He's into fencing now, since K2. He's got lots of interest in that, and not too bad at it too. Wonder if that would qualify him for DSA too?


To qualify for DSA sports, the schools normally look for medalist at the National Schools level. So if the child is winning medals, then he has a very good chance of getting into the school he wants through DSA, and have funding/support for that sport.

Some schools do take in finalists and those who have spent time training but did not even get into finals as well. For example, some schools take swimming finalists for their water polo teams. They go for tryouts. If you have ball sense and have trained competitively for a few years, they'll take you.

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Re: To swim or not to swim competitively?

Postby ChiefKiasu » Thu Feb 18, 2010 7:27 am

2ppaamm wrote:Competitive swimming is not for everybody. It is about you against yourself. There is no opponent in the pool. Your aim is to move your body faster and faster with every practise or competition. Your opponent? The clock.

What I like about Singapore competitive swimming:
1. It is an established sport, and the funding is good. So if your kid becomes really good and has a chance the represent Singapore, he gets a lot of goodies and support.

2. There are abundant good coaches all over Singapore, you can pick and choose who you want.

3. Singapore promotes Swimming, and therefore, there are many competitions for swimmers to hone their skills.

4. Disciplines the mind. At the highest level in Singapore, swimmers train 11 to 13 times a week, including Upper Primary kids.

5. The sport that will cause the least injury. Well, looks like it to me!

6. Many good IP secondary schools take good swimmers for DSA, but you have to be really good, just like any other sports.

7. With a good competitive swimming background, you can excel in many other sports, like water polo, synchronized swimming, triathlon, biathlon. Many ex-swimmers go on and become state representatives in these sports.

What I do not like:

1. There's no team. Your kid will not get to learn how synergy works.

2. Very competitive parents. Who like to compare and compare their kids. Like any sport, you win some and lose some. If you are the kind of parent who want to win all the time.... er you will not like swimming. Also, please don't brag. Tak boleh tahan!

3. The long, long hours. Kids get very tired. I believe our swimmers burn out too early. In overseas competitions, our Under12 shine. After than, it's a downhill.

4. Over pushy training. If your kid is below 10, please don't push them to do 7 km a day. It will cause injury. Unfortunately, many parents push their kids to join the older kids in the hope of reaching a faster time. Coaches have told me that they are causing injuries to their own kids. But the coaches will always oblige, because they know that if they don't another coach in another club will. So let your head be on your shoulders, and not your pride.

5. Your child will grow at least 7 shades darker, and have broader shoulders and become really sporty.

6. Good swimmers are mostly wimps on land. But you will likely see this only after the kid is well into his/her teens.

7. They retire too early. As early as 18, they will want to retire. Seems to be the trend in Singapore, and I think it is strange.

So, not only must you hone your skills, in swimming, you have to make sure the body is in good shape as well. If you allow it to slag, you will be dragging a burden across the pool. Discipline, diet, sleep and habit becomes part and parcel of the game.

Hope this helps you make a informed decision. :celebrate:


This is a most accurate and comprehensive description of competitve swimming. Thanks 2ppaamm!

Just to add to your "Not like" point 5 -> For girls, we've got to watch out for the broad shoulders part!

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