Day dreamer

Parental influence on children in the first 12 years of their lives have a permanent effect. Unfortunately, children come with no user manual. Each child is different from the other. Discuss how to handle emotional and educational needs of your child here.

Day dreamer

Postby jacsplace » Tue Oct 19, 2010 9:11 am

My P1 daughter tends to daydream. She's okay for the first 15 mins of doing her school work, then her mind begins to wander. She does this in school and her classmates and teacher have to bring her back to reality. She does it at home too.

As a result, she couldn't finish her English practice paper. Her actual papers are next week. How to get her to focus for one and a half hours? :stupid:

jacsplace
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Postby cherrygal » Tue Oct 19, 2010 5:16 pm

Does she attend any enrichment classes? Some classes help the kids to learn how to focus.

What time does she sleep? Insufficient sleep also causes kids to day dream as they feel sleepy. My niece at P2 has to sleep by 9pm latest in order to wake up at 6am.

Have you tried asking her what she thinks about? It could shed some light on the issue. If she dreams about TV programs, she could be watching too much TV or exposed to unsuitable content.

Try giving her some Fish oil.

cherrygal
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Postby jacsplace » Wed Oct 20, 2010 2:49 pm

Hi cherrygal,

Thanks very much for this reply. She goes for art and Lego lessons. She sleeps late, always after 10pm. She sometimes sleeps in the afternoons. I haven't asked her what she thinks about, but she does watch quite a bit of TV. She's taking a multi-vit syrup.

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Postby cherrygal » Wed Oct 20, 2010 5:32 pm

Observe her for a few days. If she can't focus on anything more than 15 mins, then maybe you should see a PD to discuss. If she can stay focused on an entire TV program, then you can put aside health issues. She could just be bored with what the teacher's teaching. Try testing her verbally and see if she knows the answers.

As for her drifting off during an exam, you have to do some mock drills at home and take away her paper once the time is up. I don't think kids like the feeling of failure.

Can you also try to tell the teacher to knock on her desk to "wake" her up during the exam? Not sure if they will accede to such requests.

cherrygal
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Postby jacsplace » Thu Oct 21, 2010 9:09 am

She loves art and she can do that for hours! And she can stay focused on TV shows too, sometimes to the point of ignoring anyone calling her. She does know answers to questions, and if she doesn't know, she'll ask for explanations. Doing mock drills now since there's no school. Thanks for suggestion on desk-knocking :D

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