How do teachers deal with visual spatial learners?

Parental influence on children in the first 12 years of their lives have a permanent effect. Unfortunately, children come with no user manual. Each child is different from the other. Discuss how to handle emotional and educational needs of your child here.

How do teachers deal with visual spatial learners?

Postby 2ppaamm » Fri Nov 05, 2010 2:54 pm

Do you have visual-spatial learners (or upside down brilliance) in your house? I have 3.

You can identify them in our system easily: they won't show workings in their Maths papers, derive answers in the strangest ways and methods. Mostly methods not taught in school. Choose to be too creative in their writings and irk their teachers.

We cope pretty well at home, because I learn their pattern of learning as a mother. How do your teachers cope with them? I ask because our teachers seem to only know how to teach auditory-sequential children.

Any ideas? How educated are our teachers about different learning styles?

Here's to find out which your child belong to:
http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/Visual ... er/vsl.htm

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby pecalis » Fri Nov 05, 2010 4:24 pm

Very interesting article. I always struggle with dd1 for her disorganized, messy room and misplaced or displaced items. She hates rote learning - just like me, but we are not highly gifted, get by in school rather well. I wouldn't say she studied very hard this yr for her psle as she is not the type to sit down and study. What she did was just complete the tons of hw given by the sch. Her method of solving Math problems always amazes me. I simply conclude tt she uses her creativity to solve the problem in the fastest way. She writes with pics in her mind too but is being trained to organize and think of the sequence.
Her spelling has always been bad though she was taught phonics since young - I thought she may be mildly dyslexic but her English language is good due to her love for books.
May be she belongs to this category. Will find out more. Thanks for sharing again:)

pecalis
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 281
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:19 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby MoonFlower » Fri Nov 05, 2010 4:38 pm

hi, I had read yr post on being gifted and i enjoy reading and watching the video clip attached. Thanks for sharing.
Just to share I'm visual learner myself, the best part is I only know when I become a mom. For me, I will have images formed when people talked or described things to me or even having ideas for anything. Then I will like scribble or draw or whatever to allow myself to see it on papers. Watching movies, I can see the next images in my mind so at times I will start laugh before they show.
My ds is more a auditory learner, so he will wonder his eyes about and his teachers felt he's dreaming. So I told him he still need his eyes to see, if not it will not work better and his teachers are upset about it. And I notice if he didn't read he will not able to understand better on the question. Also recently he started listening to music while doing his homework, I explained to him it's fine as i know his learning style but I need him to also respect me when i talk to him he has to remove his earphone regardless the music he is listening is loud or soft. And the volume cannot be too loud as will affect his hearing.

MoonFlower
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 201
Joined: Wed Jun 03, 2009 8:01 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby 2ppaamm » Fri Nov 05, 2010 9:00 pm

Thanks for the sharing! Glad to find some more visual spatial learners...

Here's my little story:

Though a spatial learner myself, I find it hard to cope with my kids sometimes. Perhaps it is because we, as adults have been drilled and grilled by our education system to perfect our 'steps'.

For example, in our Math paper, we get no marks when we do not show the steps that makes sense to the teacher/marker, even if our answers are correct. (Unless I was very unlucky, that was what happened to my sons many times). Boy, did I fight! It was of no use. So I asked my oldest son to learn the right steps and forgo HIS own problem solving method. He lost his love for Maths completely even though he topped his Primary school during the P6 prelims. What a fool I was!

Looking back, he (oldest boy) was the genius, and the rest of us were just system followers. I am still lost as to how we can preserve our kids' creativity and great ideas.

I watched my other son do his Maths one day. I saw that he was heading for the wrong answer, it was crystal clear to me, I am, afterall, the Math major in our house. So, I stopped him, wanting to show him the 'right steps' to the answer. Since he is not your regular child (he is AS), he put up such a big fight I almost lost my lungs shouting at him. Why won't he listen to me showing him just one step in his algebra, I thought to myself. And, I seldom teach him!!! I wanted some obedience here!

He cried and kicked up a big fight and went to the room. Then, I talked myself into letting go of the situation, so I told him to do just what he wanted. TO MY BIG SURPRISE, he gave me the right answer using a completely different and shorter method?! He smugged at me. Smiled and walked off.

I told myself never to meddle with his Math again. I observed him again these few days as this 10 year old boy pick up the pencil and solve his sister's 'O' levels math happily. He saw the whole picture in his mind first, then solved everything all at once. He has no steps! He'd look at me and ask, "Right? Mummy?" I'd shrug my shoulders, because I don't know. I haven't picked up my pencil and gone through the question one step at a time like I'm trained to do. I can calculate very fast, and I can go through the steps very quickly, but I HAVE to go through the steps. Now that I have not picked up that pencil, I don't know the answers.

On the other hand, if you ask him to solve the steps one at a time, to communicate what he is doing, he is completely disorientated and he is lost! Then it occurred to me, that he will have a hard time functioning in the classroom. If I cannot tolerate him not listening to me telling him the 'proper' steps, why can the teachers?

I begin to understand why teachers lost patience with him, and why he constantly lost patience with his teachers. With well-meaning teachers, he could end up like me. Adopting the world's wisdom and solve problems step by step, not using my first gift of being able to solve them from the start without those steps. Now that I have not used them, I have lost those abilities as well.

I'm sure many of us have kids like this, they are bright but cannot function in a regular classroom simply because they learn differently. What are we, as parents, to do? Force them into the mold already made? How can help them to learn without them losing their special talents? I'm still puzzled... :?

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby 2ppaamm » Fri Nov 05, 2010 9:20 pm

MoonFlower wrote:hi, I had read yr post on being gifted and i enjoy reading and watching the video clip attached. Thanks for sharing.
Just to share I'm visual learner myself, the best part is I only know when I become a mom. For me, I will have images formed when people talked or described things to me or even having ideas for anything. Then I will like scribble or draw or whatever to allow myself to see it on papers. Watching movies, I can see the next images in my mind so at times I will start laugh before they show.
My ds is more a auditory learner, so he will wonder his eyes about and his teachers felt he's dreaming. So I told him he still need his eyes to see, if not it will not work better and his teachers are upset about it. And I notice if he didn't read he will not able to understand better on the question. Also recently he started listening to music while doing his homework, I explained to him it's fine as i know his learning style but I need him to also respect me when i talk to him he has to remove his earphone regardless the music he is listening is loud or soft. And the volume cannot be too loud as will affect his hearing.

Hey moonflower, how do you tell if DS is an auditory person, because he sounds like a visual person to me... My oldest son, who is clearly spatial, definitely needs music on when he does his work.

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6



Re: How do teachers deal with visual spatial learners?

Postby teachingmum » Fri Nov 05, 2010 10:29 pm

2ppaamm wrote:Do you have visual-spatial learners (or upside down brilliance) in your house? I have 3.

You can identify them in our system easily: they won't show workings in their Maths papers, derive answers in the strangest ways and methods. Mostly methods not taught in school. Choose to be too creative in their writings and irk their teachers.

We cope pretty well at home, because I learn their pattern of learning as a mother. How do your teachers cope with them? I ask because our teachers seem to only know how to teach auditory-sequential children.

Any ideas? How educated are our teachers about different learning styles
Here's to find out which your child belong to:
http://www.gifteddevelopment.com/Visual ... er/vsl.htm


Hi 2ppaamm,

Thanks for the sharing. After reading through the list, I guess my boy is also a visual spatial learner. Indeed, while he was in childcare, the usual complaint was he did not pay attention in class.

Though we know he has good reasoning and problem solving skills, these were not reflected in his schoolwork. His schoolwork was usually in a mess and when we asked him why, he said there was not enough time for him. At home, he would draw elaborate pictures such as the botanic gardens with all the details, but in school, it would be a very bland piece, just for the sake of submitting his work to his teacher within the given time.

We withdrew him from K2 in September and started to teach him and surprisingly, he learnt fast and could do the P1 books. Like what you have mentioned, they have their own way of doing Math, arriving at solutions by skipping steps. Often when he skipped a step, being an anxious ex teacher (who knows all steps must be clearly shown), I would ask him how he had arrived at the particular number and he would just tell me that he thought of it/ used his brain/ counted.

Have not tried any books of even higher level as it seems to be too good to be true that he just needed two months to catch up what he had missed in his 3 years in childcare.

He's going back to school again next year for P1. Dunno whether he will slow down again to blend in. Dunno whether he will feel bored esp when he already knows his P1 work. It's gonna be a struggle. Handle correctly, he will do well. Handle wrongly, he can easily be an underachiever. Sigh....

teachingmum
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
 
Posts: 79
Joined: Mon Aug 16, 2010 4:44 pm
Total Likes: 0


Re: How do teachers deal with visual spatial learners?

Postby 2ppaamm » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:09 am

teachingmum wrote:He's going back to school again next year for P1. Dunno whether he will slow down again to blend in. Dunno whether he will feel bored esp when he already knows his P1 work. It's gonna be a struggle. Handle correctly, he will do well. Handle wrongly, he can easily be an underachiever. Sigh....

I also homeschooled my son when he was K2. When he went back to school, he was very good and followed well in P1. But, in P2, it was a horrific experience for the whole family. One particular teacher cannot stand him because he was a loud-mouth and know-it-all. Not positive at all.

I do hope your experience will be much better than mine.

Just wondering when the system will realise there are different kinds of learners and change our marking system accordingly. I put my kids through some other countries' systems and they are not so hung up about workings, methods etc. If the right answer, they are pretty much accepted. The system works for some kids, 2 of my kids adapt to systems very well, but for the rest, their minds see the solution they must write it down, otherwise, they'll get distracted and lose their thoughts.

Going back to school will be a new challenge. I do hope you'll keep the good work with your son. Along the way, I think I have lost some of my vision since my kids starting formal schooling 10 years ago. I wish I have retained and remembered some of my beliefs which were diluted as I get more and more jaded by the education system.

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby pecalis » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:27 am

pecalis wrote:Very interesting article. I always struggle with dd1 for her disorganized, messy room and misplaced or displaced items. She hates rote learning - just like me, but we are not highly gifted, get by in school rather well. I wouldn't say she studied very hard this yr for her psle as she is not the type to sit down and study. What she did was just complete the tons of hw given by the sch. Her method of solving Math problems always amazes me. I simply conclude tt she uses her creativity to solve the problem in the fastest way. She writes with pics in her mind too but is being trained to organize and think of the sequence.
Her spelling has always been bad though she was taught phonics since young - I thought she may be mildly dyslexic but her English language is good due to her love for books.
May be she belongs to this category. Will find out more. Thanks for sharing again:)


Looking at the differences again, realised dd1 is both an auditory and visual learner. Actually knew this when she was in pre-sch and knew tt she'll have no problems fitting in the sch system as she has the auditory part - ideal student for a sch tr as she would sit still, listen well and maintain eye contact with tr. Many trs actually thanked her and gave feedback tt she's a joy to have in class.

However, the visual part of her helps her to grasp concept quickly and have good memory.

2ppaamm, thanks again for sharing. Have been very blessed by your sharing of personal experiences, positive ones and even the struggles. Just to let you know tt many of us look forward to your posts and benefit from them too :)

pecalis
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 281
Joined: Tue Nov 17, 2009 9:19 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Guest » Sat Nov 06, 2010 12:39 am

My child seems to be a mixture of both too. What does that mean? well-fitted into SG edu system? :?
Guest
 

Postby 2ppaamm » Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:39 am

Pecali and ksi, I guess you guys are really blessed. Whichever our child is, he has a special way of learning and that's his gifts. Being able to function both ways and not skewed to either does seem that they can adapt well.

Hehe.... probably going to see some minister material in your children... Er.. don't forget me when your children reach there.... buy me coffee hor. :celebrate:

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Next

Return to Working With Your Child