Handed homework went missing

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Handed homework went missing

Postby EN » Tue Apr 14, 2009 9:32 am

My son has recently been asked to re-do homework which he has completed and has handed to the teacher. There are 4 cases in all relating to two different teachers.

Out of the 4 cases, twice the teacher is able to find his homework among her stack of files.

The other teacher seems to be more apologetic however; she demanded to know from my son, which relief teacher he has handed his work to (the teacher in-charged was on medical leave that day). I found it strange for a teacher to be asking her student who the relief teacher was when I feel that the appropriate way is for her to be in touch with the office rather than insisting my son to remember the relief teacher’s name.

I know my son has completed his homework as I have helped to vet through all the 4 works that were said missing. The work done is of good quality so there should not be any hesitation on my son part not to submit his homework. Secondly, he is extremely neat in packing his school equipment, books and homework are put in homework folder.

Do other parents face the same issue of teachers missing your child’s homework / project? What would you do when face with the same problem?

EN
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Re: Handed homework went missing

Postby chie » Wed Apr 15, 2009 9:42 am

EN wrote:My son has recently been asked to re-do homework which he has completed and has handed to the teacher. There are 4 cases in all relating to two different teachers.

Out of the 4 cases, twice the teacher is able to find his homework among her stack of files.

The other teacher seems to be more apologetic however; she demanded to know from my son, which relief teacher he has handed his work to (the teacher in-charged was on medical leave that day). I found it strange for a teacher to be asking her student who the relief teacher was when I feel that the appropriate way is for her to be in touch with the office rather than insisting my son to remember the relief teacher’s name.

I know my son has completed his homework as I have helped to vet through all the 4 works that were said missing. The work done is of good quality so there should not be any hesitation on my son part not to submit his homework. Secondly, he is extremely neat in packing his school equipment, books and homework are put in homework folder.

Do other parents face the same issue of teachers missing your child’s homework / project? What would you do when face with the same problem?


I had not had the chance to face with such issues yet but if I were in your shoes and the homework done is of good quality and symbolises certain milestone achieved and not the usual routine, practising homework, I will press for the teacher to find the homework out and explain where it had landed with instead of being in the homework folder.

Personally, it does not feel good to know that my child's homework can be so easily misplaced as it mean that the school does not really care.

Just my 2 cents worth.

chie
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Postby EN » Wed Apr 15, 2009 12:22 pm

Hi Chie. Thanks for replying.

I share your view too and I tried to persuade my son not to re-do all the four homework that went missing. He did re-submit one of the works but clearly he was extremely upset & was crying when I told him I will be calling up the teacher to discuss the issue. He was afraid that he will be at the receiving end as the teacher might take it on him.

I called up the teacher last Thursday, discussing on the issue amicably. The teacher promised to look into her files again. I was shocked when I came back from business trip on Monday night to see my son quivering when I asked how was school and there the sob story began.

I wanted to have another follow up with the teacher again yesterday but my son happily told me that the teacher managed to find the misplaced homework.

The thing is, my son work was read to the class and the other work was shown to the class by the teacher, so we do have the entire class as a witness.

Not sure if I should follow up with an e-mail to the teacher just in case the same issue happen again. Should I or should I let the matter be since it is resolved?

EN
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Re: Handed homework went missing

Postby Francis » Wed Apr 15, 2009 2:39 pm

EN wrote:My son has recently been asked to re-do homework which he has completed and has handed to the teacher. There are 4 cases in all relating to two different teachers.

Out of the 4 cases, twice the teacher is able to find his homework among her stack of files.

The other teacher seems to be more apologetic however; she demanded to know from my son, which relief teacher he has handed his work to (the teacher in-charged was on medical leave that day). I found it strange for a teacher to be asking her student who the relief teacher was when I feel that the appropriate way is for her to be in touch with the office rather than insisting my son to remember the relief teacher’s name.

I know my son has completed his homework as I have helped to vet through all the 4 works that were said missing. The work done is of good quality so there should not be any hesitation on my son part not to submit his homework. Secondly, he is extremely neat in packing his school equipment, books and homework are put in homework folder.

Do other parents face the same issue of teachers missing your child’s homework / project? What would you do when face with the same problem?

My son do face such a problem in school. The teacher will never admit their mistake. If your son workbook have been found, just write a gentle email to the teacher thanks her effort that she have found the workbook. On the other hand, keep this email as a record that the workbook is misplace by the teacher. Next time,ask the teacher, the workbook is lost in school,who is responsible?

Francis
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Postby chie » Wed Apr 15, 2009 6:42 pm

EN wrote:Not sure if I should follow up with an e-mail to the teacher just in case the same issue happen again. Should I or should I let the matter be since it is resolved?


For me, I will let the matter rest since it has been resolved. I would also normally give 3 chances for the same error, depending on circumstances of course. If it happens for the 4th time, I will really pursue it and ask the teacher for a satisfactory explanation because it matters to me why it can keep happening.

chie
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Postby EN » Thu Apr 16, 2009 8:54 am

Hi Again

Thanks all for the replies.

Since 4 homeworks (4 times) were missing and the teachers actually scolded my son for not handing in the homeworks, disbelieving him when he keeps on telling the teachers that the homeworks are done and handed in, I have decided to write to the teachers. Not to antagonize but to write a gentle message as Francis suggested, thanking them for their help in locating the missing homeworks. Oh yes, I will definitely keep the e-mail just in case it happen again.

Insiders, I am glad the missing homeworks are no longer misplaced. I don't want to ask my son to re-do the homework because I dont want to impact his morale. Just like an adult at work, hard pressed for time but put an effort and attack a work with vigour and enthusiasm but ended up the work done was lost through no fault of his. To add on, getting scolded in front of classmates is not a very pleasant experience for him either.

Having said this, I did remind him to let go of the incident. Yes, forgiveness is part of the process and ensure that he is happy to go back to school and not traumatized by the experience.

Anyway, I did find out why his social study teacher says his works are missing without actually contacting his teacher. The social study teacher has been hassling my son for two weeks when at last on Monday, after being prompted by the form teacher (the one that lost his composition papers), the teacher approach him and ask for his name.

I guess this is a case of mistaken identity. :lol:

EN
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Postby Francis » Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:20 am

chie wrote:
EN wrote:Not sure if I should follow up with an e-mail to the teacher just in case the same issue happen again. Should I or should I let the matter be since it is resolved?


For me, I will let the matter rest since it has been resolved. I would also normally give 3 chances for the same error, depending on circumstances of course. If it happens for the 4th time, I will really pursue it and ask the teacher for a satisfactory explanation because it matters to me why it can keep happening.


Yes, its good to be-give n forgive. But,do keep a record for every incident.When the actual time you pursue(after 4th time),they have forgotten what happen the previous.Very good tactics indeed.Just put yourself in the child shoe,after all the hard work,worksheet misplace by the teacher n get scolding.

Francis
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Postby Guest » Thu Apr 16, 2009 11:57 am

Just a suggestion if this is occuring too often and causing unhappiness between kid and teacher. Writing emails of history may not solve the issue and potentially generate a sour relationship with the teachers. However I will work on the future happenings and take this opportunity to suggest to the teacher to work with the teacher on my child's "shortcoming" if it truly exists.

Personally I will do the following for my child.
1. Get her a small notebook
2. Write homework to be handed in
3. Get teacher's(those teachers with issues only) acknowledgement when handing in or even group leaders authorised by the teachers are fine as long as teachers are willing to participate. I do not see why the teachers will be unwilling if the teachers want to prove that my child has not handed in the homework and want to help the child to change the behaviour.

I do this for a few reasons as a parent:
a. To show track record of my child's ability to be responsible for herself to the teacher
b. To train my child what responsibility means if my child really has a shortfall in this area.
c. Homework may not only be handled by teachers and child but sometimes group leaders or subject leaders who may also be misplacing this.

So using this system, there is more traceability on where things go wrong.

Hope this can work for you too.
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Postby Guest » Thu Apr 16, 2009 1:17 pm

insider wrote:In Early Childhood Education, we talk a lot about kids' self esteem, etc. But in this area, I feel it has been over-rated in a way. When kids are within our home / care, then we can control how we want to build / destroy their self esteem. Once they are out, then many times, they have to learn in an incremental step way to face the society made up of so many different types of people.

A controversial approach of mine that I know many may not agree...


I agree to this point because this is a full subscription to the western approach of raising the children. I believe in drawing the best approach from both east and west methods and also putting them back to the real world to test its effectiveness. In the real world, the imperfections perpetuates but learning the skills to handle is far more imperative and that in itself raises self-esteem once problems are overcome. If it is not overcome, a lesson learnt but not necessarily a destruction of esteem depending on outlook and upbringing. Self-esteem is raised by self, not always waiting for people to give or help to raise that self-esteem especially when one gets older and exposed to a world of strangers.

If a child can manage, a world of strangers will turn into a world of partnership.
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Postby csc » Thu Apr 16, 2009 2:00 pm

I had that experience once too when I was in Pr 6. My form teacher flung my English compo book at me! (why always compo, huh?)

I was humiliated of course - and my face was red as beetroot. I don't remember appreciating her "humiliation". In fact, she was one of my 'most hated' teachers.

I'm glad my esteem was not affected by her in anyway. Most of my teachers are great and play a part in moulding me into what I'm today. I am not going to let one "black sheep' leave a scar in my life forever.

csc
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