Daydreaming child

Parental influence on children in the first 12 years of their lives have a permanent effect. Unfortunately, children come with no user manual. Each child is different from the other. Discuss how to handle emotional and educational needs of your child here.

Daydreaming child

Postby kylene » Thu Aug 29, 2013 7:29 am

Hi all,

My DS is 5 years old and is constantly daydreaming. When he was in childcare, the teachers reported him as always looking out of the window during lessons. Now he is in K1 and has to be constantly reminded to do his work be it writing or cutting, otherwise he'll just sit there and stare into space.

At home, he takes forever to put on his clothes , I would often find him half dressed and staring into space. I'm worried because he keeps bringing home school work that he cannot finish in school. Would appreciate any advice. Thanks!

kylene
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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby vinegar » Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:03 am

hv u ever asked him what is in his mind? Is he worrying or thinking abt playing games,etc??

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby Nebbermind » Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:08 am

vinegar wrote:hv u ever asked him what is in his mind? Is he worrying or thinking abt playing games,etc??

Like seeing Angry Birds outside the window?

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby kylene » Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:15 am

Haha yes I asked but he said "I don't know". Sometimes he'll say he's dreaming about Neverland and Peter Pan etc, whatever he's interested in at that time. Currently it's Peter Pan

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby slmkhoo » Thu Aug 29, 2013 9:32 am

My older daughter was like that. In the end, it turns out that she has some learning disability, but please don't assume that is the case with your child! Some kids just like to take their time. What we did was to use timers to give a set time for each task. It's more work for the caregiver initially, but after some time (could be months), the child gets into the habit of doing things faster. You can also ask the teachers to remind him when he drifts off, not necessarily in speech, but maybe just tapping his desk or his book when he's drifted off.

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby ammonite » Thu Aug 29, 2013 10:36 am

My elder was like this for written work. Turned out he has vision issues and could not see clearly. He is also sensitive to light and cannot work under bright lights. I was sure it was not an attention issue because he was very focused when doing hands on projects and has no problems at home due to different lighting.

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby hTz » Thu Aug 29, 2013 11:33 am

My eldest was also always day-dreaming.In the end, I found out he was short-sighted. So sometimes, it could be more than just a lack of focus.

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby kylene » Thu Aug 29, 2013 2:54 pm

Hi thanks to all who responded!

He had his eyes checked earlier this year. And this year the teacher says the problem is when he is sitting at his desk. On the floor or he doesn't have problems concentrating.

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby ammonite » Fri Aug 30, 2013 10:16 am

kylene wrote:Hi thanks to all who responded!

He had his eyes checked earlier this year. And this year the teacher says the problem is when he is sitting at his desk. On the floor or he doesn't have problems concentrating.


Kinaethestic learner? A novelist in making? :)

You should ask the teacher what she thinks is the difference between the floor and the table. If it is only for writing tasks (ie reading is okay) and buttons (changing clothes), consider if his fine motor skills and motor planning is on par with his peers.

(But 5 is a very iffy age for such things though a trained eye can pick out early signs and clear cases.)

Consider as well if there is a lot of writing in his school. I am pretty surprised that a 5 year old has to take homework back to do, regardless of daydreaming. Shouldn't the teacher be doing more in class to ensure that it is finished??

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Re: Daydreaming child

Postby jedamum » Fri Aug 30, 2013 11:03 am

Have you ask him what is on his mind on such occasions?.
He may be a potential creative thinker! Understand him and harness his potential. Does he likes to draw?
My boy is complete opposite. Always on the go and multi tasking.there is hardly any down time not even when he is not feeling well.

Also do check if he has sufficient sleep.

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