Development Support Programme

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Development Support Programme

Postby Kidsprodigy » Wed Jun 10, 2015 3:00 pm

I recent heard from my friend that her children childcare has this developmental support programme which access the development of the k1 and k2 children. It sounds quite interesting. Any parents' children who went through the programme and if its effective?

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby go4itmummy » Thu Jun 11, 2015 8:38 am

I think this is rolled out in some preschool where kids with mild development needs are singled out and given extra help. I personally am not sure if it's a good idea to label them so early in their life.

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby limhc » Mon Sep 21, 2015 9:03 am

I used to think so too - no labeling. but after seeing my boys make improvement after therapy and coaching and after reading on early intervention i start to change my mind. but i agree not all children need these programmes. if in doubt bring to your doctor or get your child assessed!

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby ammonite » Mon Sep 21, 2015 10:14 am

Early intervention make a lot of difference and many of the activities are compatible with children play. You can call it purposeful play. There is no need to shy away from intervention. On labels, labels are useful for identification for allocation of resources but it does not need to stick on the child who is oblivious. It is important that adults do not discuss them in front of the kids and be mindful of one's speech around them. This is a golden rule that must be observed.

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby slmkhoo » Mon Sep 21, 2015 11:31 am

ammonite wrote:Early intervention make a lot of difference and many of the activities are compatible with children play. You can call it purposeful play. There is no need to shy away from intervention. On labels, labels are useful for identification for allocation of resources but it does not need to stick on the child who is oblivious. It is important that adults do not discuss them in front of the kids and be mindful of one's speech around them. This is a golden rule that must be observed.

Totally agree. Not giving a child appropriate intervention when he needs it just makes it harder for him. On the other hand, we need to bear in mind that labels are for adults' convenience and to ease communication between parents and professionals, not a definition of what the child is. After intervention, the child may improve enough to outgrow a particular label or some aspects of that label. When my child was young and we did a lot of things with her that other kids did not need, we explained to her in simple terms that she seemed to need a bit more practice in those areas, and encouraged her to keep trying. It was only when she was about 12 that we actually explained her diagnosis in any detail, again emphasising how it was simply a shorthand description of areas which she found tougher than other kids, and that everyone was different. It was sometimes difficult to stop the grandparents talking about her in her presence, and I had to sometimes interrupt them and stop them, or send my daughter away on some pretext. Even though they were sometimes offended, I felt that it was quite damaging to the child's already fragile self-esteem to be talked about like that.

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby ammonite » Mon Sep 21, 2015 12:03 pm

just briefly as my wrist is acting up, to add on, there is no need to share the diagnosis with anyone who will not benefit from knowing. This includes family members and siblings. If knowing helps them to interact better, share it. If it doesn't, there is no need to say anything. It is also possible to inform caregivers on strategies without notifying them of any diagnoses. You are the parent, you decide. There is no need to inform any gossipy relatives either.

(Edit to add, this post is not directed at you, Slmkhoo. Just adding on, hope no offence caused!)

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby slmkhoo » Mon Sep 21, 2015 1:04 pm

ammonite wrote:just briefly as my wrist is acting up, to add on, there is no need to share the diagnosis with anyone who will not benefit from knowing. This includes family members and siblings. If knowing helps them to interact better, share it. If it doesn't, there is no need to say anything. It is also possible to inform caregivers on strategies without notifying them of any diagnoses. You are the parent, you decide. There is no need to inform any gossipy relatives either.

(Edit to add, this post is not directed at you, Slmkhoo. Just adding on, hope no offence caused!)

Actually, I think like you! I didn't get my daughter officially diagnosed till 14yo, but I knew in my mind the issues that she was facing and we dealt with them. I also just talked about strategies and "ways to improve" to teachersm relatives and caregivers, and tried not to make a big deal of it. But even without telling the grandparents, they could see with their own eyes and they would proffer their own "diagnoses" and ways to "fix" them, and do it in front of the kids! And they would frequently compare her with their friends' kids, or with my younger daughter, so I was always having to be on the alert. At some points I had to speak quite firmly to them about it, and then they got angry with me!

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby ammonite » Tue Sep 22, 2015 11:12 am

slmkhoo wrote: At some points I had to speak quite firmly to them about it, and then they got angry with me!


:hugs:

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Re: Development Support Programme

Postby oclet » Mon Sep 28, 2015 5:48 pm

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Cheers.

oclet
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