how to coach problem sums in p1

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how to coach problem sums in p1

Postby kaitlynangelica » Fri May 21, 2010 1:51 pm

Any suggestions anyone? I find that most kids can add/subtract/multiply etc but they don't have the maturity to sit down and think through a problem sum.

Tamarind,

Any ideas?

kaitlynangelica
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Re: how to coach problem sums in p1

Postby CoffeeCat » Fri May 21, 2010 9:06 pm

kaitlynangelica wrote:Any suggestions anyone? I find that most kids can add/subtract/multiply etc but they don't have the maturity to sit down and think through a problem sum.

Tamarind,

Any ideas?

do they have the maturity to read a short simple story?

CoffeeCat
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Solving Problem Sums for P1

Postby blue_momento » Fri Jun 11, 2010 1:34 pm

Hi there!

Problem sums for P1 is more like Story Sums whereby a short story is told to a child and getting the child to solve the problems.

A young child learns through different stages. They need to see the physical being of the items, then move on to the pictorial and then to abstract form. If you merely present the problem sum to the child in terms of words, the child might feel lost. If you present the problem sum to the child in terms of pictures but the child has yet to encounter the subjects mentioned in the questions, e.g. PICTURE FRAMES or AIRPLANES, the child might be equally lost.

The best way to coach a child in story or problem sums is to engage the child in his/her learning daily and create simple story sums as he/she experience something for his/her own. For instance, going to the grocery store or the playground is an excellent opportunity to teach story sums.

Hope the above helps!

Cheers,
blue_momento :celebrate:
(a primary one teacher of six years)

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Postby Anna Ng » Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:00 pm

How to teach this:

There are total 10 white and green balls in a box. If there are 2 white balls more than green balls, how many white balls are there?

Can show me the working?

Anna Ng
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Postby buds » Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:13 pm

Minus the extra white balls first.

10-2=8

Followed by dividing the answer ( 8 )
into the two colours (green/white) = 4

Green balls : 4

White balls : 4+2=6

To check : Total of green & white balls
must total up to the original number of
balls in the box. I call this *checkmate*
method when teaching both my girls.
My own term. :D

6+4=10

You can also use drawings with P1 students.
Visual impressions help them to understand
better.

buds
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Postby blue_momento » Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:34 pm

Just to add on to Bud's reply :)

The child should be proficient with the 1-to-1 matching skill that is taught during the comparison topic.

First, tell the child that we are going to draw the balls in two rows, white one row, and green the next row.

Next, draw the TWO MORE WHITE balls first, and then ask child how many more balls are left from the ten balls. She will answer EIGHT.

Then you get child to draw one white ball, one green ball, and match them. Continue till you have four white balls and four green balls, all matched.

Ask child to look the drawing again. All the four green balls are matched except for two white balls.

Read the story again. Get child to recognise that she has summarised the story in the pictorial form.

Hope this helps!

:)

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Postby buds » Fri Jun 11, 2010 2:55 pm

On the contrary, I would draw it in this manner.

O O O O O O O O O O

Strike out / colour the 1st two white balls.
That would justify the number sentence : 10-2=___

[Children can easily get the visual impressions
wrong due to mis-count or mis-draw, hence in
my opinion.. it is safer to draw the original 10
balls first] > That said, this is my personal
preference. Blue_momento's drawing is
also fine.

Children can either proceed to colour one
white ball and number it one followed by a
corresponding green ball for every white ball
coloured and numbered.

One to one matching can be done by drawing
a line into a small box like drawing / square
until all the balls are accounted for.

Because there are 10 balls and [*ten balls only],
i always have to emphasize *this as children tend
to forget the original total number of balls they had
to work with. I will ask them to see if they understand..

Especially during checkmate time, must reiterate.

Me : How many balls in total / in the box again?

Child : 10 balls in a box.

Sum of green & white balls cannot be more or less
than (the original) 10 balls.

buds
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