Foreign Language

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Foreign Language

Postby flyfree » Mon Aug 08, 2011 12:54 pm

Dear parents

Do u let your child learn foreign languages in pri sch /sec sch?
Which pri sch /sec sch hv foreign languages? what are the "preferred & more popular" foreign lanuages?

Pls share your opinions, experiences.

flyfree
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Re: Foreign Language

Postby ridcully » Tue Aug 09, 2011 10:07 am

flyfree wrote:Dear parents

Do u let your child learn foreign languages in pri sch /sec sch?
Which pri sch /sec sch hv foreign languages? what are the "preferred & more popular" foreign lanuages?

Pls share your opinions, experiences.
Given that more than 50% of pupils entering Primary 1 speak English at home as their first language, one could argue that Chinese, Malay and Tamil are foreign languages. :rotflmao:

There is a total of seven Third Languages presently offered in secondary schools. These include Bahasa Indonesia, Arabic, French, German and Japanese. See http://www.moe.edu.sg/education/seconda ... rogrammes/

My first opinion is that foreign languages are useful but should not be examinable.

My second opinion is that I would prefer students to develop mastery of one language rather than functional standard in several. I think it is very difficult for most people to develop a high proficiency in more than one language, and I suspect that many higher thinking skills are dependent on the level achieved in the first language.

My third opinion is that the first language should be English. World trade and scientific data are overwhelmingly in English, and English will dominate way into the future. Some people suggest that Chinese, for instance, will grow in importance. Possibly, but it is a fossilised language that does not have the flexibility of sound-based alphabetised languages; the Chinese themselves are desperating learning English in order to plug into the global economy.

Rgds
R

ridcully
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