O levels

PSLE marks the graduation of Primary school students and their entry into Secondary schools as teenagers. Discuss all issues about Secondary schooling here.

O levels

Postby James Ang » Tue Sep 15, 2009 1:44 am

My student once said this...
sometimes, the more you study, the more you believe you can. there should be no stereotypes like "oh only students from top schools can make it!" or " normal academic cannot achieve F9 to A1 in 3 months!".. the more you study, the more you understand, the more confident you are of winning, the more chances of you getting really good grades.

cant understand, ask for help. ask for help until you can understand. i dont believe in the elitist system at all! its saddening to classify students into such. what "only elite students can achieve this" and "neighbourhood students cant.." are rubbish. believe and you can, disbelieve and you cant. believing you can do it create what others dubbed miracles. we walk our own lives. if others want to stereotype us, let it be. its their opinions, not ours.
_________________
clouderz
(VS,VJC,NUS)

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Re: O levels

Postby ChiefKiasu » Tue Sep 15, 2009 9:34 am

There is an article posted to the Straits Times' Forum today, in response to VS' plans to go IP. While I have not really been following the fight between the school and its alumni, I do agree that the move towards IP made by more and more Secondary schools is indeed creating new stratas of elitism as we break down the old (eg. EM3, secondary school GEP).

Is the old system of going for "O" levels first, followed by "A" levels, and then tertiary education so flawed that we have to keep innovating new schemes just so our children can "survive" the future? What exactly is wrong with the old system (simple Primary->Secondary->Tertiary, and pre GEP, EM3, normal vs express, etc) that we need to come up with new ones to attempt to classify and press our children into permanent moulds that will determine what kind of future he/she will have in Singapore?

I fully agree with James Ang's note that children should be taught that success is 99% effort, and 1% talent. The harder they work, the more confident they become of succeeding, and therefore the higher the chance of success. Is there a need to put glass ceilings on top of our children just so that our education system can "process" them more "efficiently"?

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Re: O levels

Postby mathsparks » Tue Sep 15, 2009 10:53 am

James Ang wrote:My student once said this...
sometimes, the more you study, the more you believe you can. there should be no stereotypes like "oh only students from top schools can make it!" or " normal academic cannot achieve F9 to A1 in 3 months!".. the more you study, the more you understand, the more confident you are of winning, the more chances of you getting really good grades.


While I do agree that studying and revising more will improve grades tremendously, the issue is where do students nowadays find time to study and study till they can? They spent time travelling to/from school, cca, cip, projects, camps, homework, tuition, music practice. To squeeze in 8 hrs rest, they would have at most 4 hrs of study on a weekday (assume they get home by 6 and study till 10pm and eat their dinner at the study table, skip family time, news time, shower after 10pm). If they don't have enough rest, whatever they try to study will not be retained.

Then weekends are spent, sometimes on the same stuff above plus church and family activities. They are not machines, they have to rest on weekends too.

PS: Don't flame me, pls. I'm just sharing the lives of average secondary students.

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Re: O levels

Postby James Ang » Tue Sep 15, 2009 12:07 pm

ChiefKiasu wrote:There is an article posted to the Straits Times' Forum today, in response to VS' plans to go IP. While I have not really been following the fight between the school and its alumni, I do agree that the move towards IP made by more and more Secondary schools is indeed creating new stratas of elitism as we break down the old (eg. EM3, secondary school GEP).

Is the old system of going for "O" levels first, followed by "A" levels, and then tertiary education so flawed that we have to keep innovating new schemes just so our children can "survive" the future? What exactly is wrong with the old system (simple Primary->Secondary->Tertiary, and pre GEP, EM3, normal vs express, etc) that we need to come up with new ones to attempt to classify and press our children into permanent moulds that will determine what kind of future he/she will have in Singapore?

I fully agree with James Ang's note that children should be taught that success is 99% effort, and 1% talent. The harder they work, the more confident they become of succeeding, and therefore the higher the chance of success. Is there a need to put glass ceilings on top of our children just so that our education system can "process" them more "efficiently"?


Yes, our future is in our own hands. Life is not just a passive event watching things and time go by.

I remember well what the teachers used to say, that there are 3 types of people in this world.

1. Those who make things happen.
2. Those who watch things happen.
3. Those who ask "What happened?".

:idea: which group does the student want to belong to?

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Re: O levels

Postby James Ang » Tue Sep 15, 2009 12:13 pm

mathsparks wrote:
James Ang wrote:My student once said this...
sometimes, the more you study, the more you believe you can. there should be no stereotypes like "oh only students from top schools can make it!" or " normal academic cannot achieve F9 to A1 in 3 months!".. the more you study, the more you understand, the more confident you are of winning, the more chances of you getting really good grades.


While I do agree that studying and revising more will improve grades tremendously, the issue is where do students nowadays find time to study and study till they can? They spent time travelling to/from school, cca, cip, projects, camps, homework, tuition, music practice. To squeeze in 8 hrs rest, they would have at most 4 hrs of study on a weekday (assume they get home by 6 and study till 10pm and eat their dinner at the study table, skip family time, news time, shower after 10pm). If they don't have enough rest, whatever they try to study will not be retained.

Then weekends are spent, sometimes on the same stuff above plus church and family activities. They are not machines, they have to rest on weekends too.

PS: Don't flame me, pls. I'm just sharing the lives of average secondary students.


consistent work helps. There is a time to study and a time to play. Life for the average secondary student is now different from the past, and from what I know, secondary level students have a 3 month long "break" from studies every year from sec 1 to sec 3. Their EOY usually ends at first week of October and from second week of October till end Dec (exactly 12 weeks) the students are "off" from their studies.

Anyway, every student has the same time resources (24hours a day, no one has more or less), from each their best I suppose, to manage their myraid forms of activities. It is a meritocratic and fair education system and society, the fittest students survive in academic and CCA pursuits and continue to climb the education ladder till ideally they complete university studies. :D

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