Last mile push for O level

PSLE marks the graduation of Primary school students and their entry into Secondary schools as teenagers. Discuss all issues about Secondary schooling here.

Re: Last mile push for O level

Postby LarryG67 » Wed Jul 10, 2013 2:37 pm

That would be worrying if you intend for your son to enter JC. I've heard from my friends that the JC cutoff is going to be even more stringent this coming round. now is not the time to slow down.

For the L1,

My son went for this intensive crashcourse for English at www.olevelenglish.com. This one was really good and the improvement that I have seen in my son (formerly c5, now working to A1) has turned me into a strong advocate (and fan). I'm sponsoring him for the long term class by the trainer too. This part i'm not worried anymore as his L1 is in good hands.

As for the R5,

like his maths,the secret is to practise and practise even more. My son used to study math by reading, which was obviously not effective. So my wife got him these ten year series books from popular. One of the good one is by this Education Publishing House (EPH) which contains all the worked solutions. I think the key is not to use those kind of assessment books which have no worked. I always believe that my kids must practise and know the answers, if not they may be practising the wrong thing. Also, sometimes, I do help him a bit if i'm home as I'm from an engineering background. His only problem is that he may be quite careless; but this can be remedied with having more systematic approaches.

For the sciences (triple science), concepts is the most important. And also the ten year series. You may realize by now that I'm also a strong advocate of TYS. But I got a tutor for my son who comes once a week to answer his questions about the concepts. This part not a problem but you have to remember that understanding and practice must come together. (This is from my experience during my Secondary, JC, Uni and Post Grad days). Private tuition must be combined with proper strategy as well. Cannot just depend on the tutor.

For humanities, I think the key is answering the question. From what I can see, most student make the mistake of regurgitating what they know, but it is a very different ball game for humanities where they test the students understanding and analysis. This is just from my observation from glancing through my son's papers.

Also, not to forget that motivation is important. I always believe that dragging a horse to the river is a losing strategy. But when the horse is thirsty, it'll even pull a cart along just to get to the river. Therefore, while we parents sometimes focus on techniques and methods, its also important to address their level motivation as well. I'm really glad the English course trainer knocked some sense into my boy, so now I can see that he is working quite hard. I always believe that when there's a will there's a way. Even though the odds seem stacked against us sometimes, we have to keep our faith and do our best no matter what. Just my two cents.

But I also do not want to impose too much pressure on my kids (as per government concerns), so no matter what, health (mental and physical) is more important than any academic results.

LarryG67
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Re: Last mile push for O level

Postby chrysophrase » Wed Jul 10, 2013 8:11 pm

LarryG67 wrote:That would be worrying if you intend for your son to enter JC. I've heard from my friends that the JC cutoff is going to be even more stringent this coming round. now is not the time to slow down.

For the L1,

My son went for this intensive crashcourse for English at http://www.olevelenglish.com. This one was really good and the improvement that I have seen in my son (formerly c5, now working to A1) has turned me into a strong advocate (and fan). I'm sponsoring him for the long term class by the trainer too. This part i'm not worried anymore as his L1 is in good hands.

As for the R5,

like his maths,the secret is to practise and practise even more. My son used to study math by reading, which was obviously not effective. So my wife got him these ten year series books from popular. One of the good one is by this Education Publishing House (EPH) which contains all the worked solutions. I think the key is not to use those kind of assessment books which have no worked. I always believe that my kids must practise and know the answers, if not they may be practising the wrong thing. Also, sometimes, I do help him a bit if i'm home as I'm from an engineering background. His only problem is that he may be quite careless; but this can be remedied with having more systematic approaches.

For the sciences (triple science), concepts is the most important. And also the ten year series. You may realize by now that I'm also a strong advocate of TYS. But I got a tutor for my son who comes once a week to answer his questions about the concepts. This part not a problem but you have to remember that understanding and practice must come together. (This is from my experience during my Secondary, JC, Uni and Post Grad days). Private tuition must be combined with proper strategy as well. Cannot just depend on the tutor.

For humanities, I think the key is answering the question. From what I can see, most student make the mistake of regurgitating what they know, but it is a very different ball game for humanities where they test the students understanding and analysis. This is just from my observation from glancing through my son's papers.

Also, not to forget that motivation is important. I always believe that dragging a horse to the river is a losing strategy. But when the horse is thirsty, it'll even pull a cart along just to get to the river. Therefore, while we parents sometimes focus on techniques and methods, its also important to address their level motivation as well. I'm really glad the English course trainer knocked some sense into my boy, so now I can see that he is working quite hard. I always believe that when there's a will there's a way. Even though the odds seem stacked against us sometimes, we have to keep our faith and do our best no matter what. Just my two cents.

But I also do not want to impose too much pressure on my kids (as per government concerns), so no matter what, health (mental and physical) is more important than any academic results.


:goodpost:

chrysophrase
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Re: Last mile push for O level

Postby kitty2 » Thu Jul 11, 2013 9:16 am

LarryG67 wrote:That would be worrying if you intend for your son to enter JC. I've heard from my friends that the JC cutoff is going to be even more stringent this coming round. now is not the time to slow down.

For the L1,

My son went for this intensive crashcourse for English at http://www.olevelenglish.com. This one was really good and the improvement that I have seen in my son (formerly c5, now working to A1) has turned me into a strong advocate (and fan). I'm sponsoring him for the long term class by the trainer too. This part i'm not worried anymore as his L1 is in good hands.

As for the R5,

like his maths,the secret is to practise and practise even more. My son used to study math by reading, which was obviously not effective. So my wife got him these ten year series books from popular. One of the good one is by this Education Publishing House (EPH) which contains all the worked solutions. I think the key is not to use those kind of assessment books which have no worked. I always believe that my kids must practise and know the answers, if not they may be practising the wrong thing. Also, sometimes, I do help him a bit if i'm home as I'm from an engineering background. His only problem is that he may be quite careless; but this can be remedied with having more systematic approaches.

For the sciences (triple science), concepts is the most important. And also the ten year series. You may realize by now that I'm also a strong advocate of TYS. But I got a tutor for my son who comes once a week to answer his questions about the concepts. This part not a problem but you have to remember that understanding and practice must come together. (This is from my experience during my Secondary, JC, Uni and Post Grad days). Private tuition must be combined with proper strategy as well. Cannot just depend on the tutor.

For humanities, I think the key is answering the question. From what I can see, most student make the mistake of regurgitating what they know, but it is a very different ball game for humanities where they test the students understanding and analysis. This is just from my observation from glancing through my son's papers.

Also, not to forget that motivation is important. I always believe that dragging a horse to the river is a losing strategy. But when the horse is thirsty, it'll even pull a cart along just to get to the river. Therefore, while we parents sometimes focus on techniques and methods, its also important to address their level motivation as well. I'm really glad the English course trainer knocked some sense into my boy, so now I can see that he is working quite hard. I always believe that when there's a will there's a way. Even though the odds seem stacked against us sometimes, we have to keep our faith and do our best no matter what. Just my two cents.

But I also do not want to impose too much pressure on my kids (as per government concerns), so no matter what, health (mental and physical) is more important than any academic results.


:goodpost: :salute:

kitty2
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Re: Last mile push for O level

Postby chinsooyoung » Thu Jul 11, 2013 3:04 pm

Hi, have emailed you (:

chinsooyoung
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