Lower Secondary Science

PSLE marks the graduation of Primary school students and their entry into Secondary schools as teenagers. Discuss all issues about Secondary schooling here.
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lostlostmom
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by lostlostmom » Mon Nov 09, 2015 11:12 pm

can advise where can i get books from wisemann publishing?

CatMoon
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by CatMoon » Wed Nov 11, 2015 11:36 am

lostlostmom wrote:can advise where can i get books from wisemann publishing?
Popular - can go to Bras Besar Complex or other bigger branches.

Dr.Daniel
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by Dr.Daniel » Wed Nov 11, 2015 2:47 pm

TeaBoh wrote:Will Sec 1 Science (Bio, Chemistry and Physics) be tested again in Sec 2 and Sec 3?
The short answer to this question is Yes.

Sec 1 Science covers the foundational topics. Sec 2 and Sec 3 also build on this foundation. In some cases the topics are separate. For example in physics it is typical for Sec 1 to cover Newtonian mechanics topics such as speed, forces and pressure (as well as other topics). In Sec 2 a typical topic is electricity which won't require you to remember all your Forces and Pressure knowledge from Sec 1. But forces and pressure will come up again in Sec 3 at a harder level of difficulty (and in JC at a harder level and in University at an even harder level). I suppose the joke here would be that you always have to deal with Pressure when studying physics.

Chemistry is also very cumulative in nature. You have to understand the basic Sec 1 Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and the Periodic Table basics before moving on to Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Equation writing, Mole Calculations etc that come is Sec 2 and Sec 3.

For Biology Sec 1 usually starts with cells and since so much of biology is based on things made up of cells, this as well is foundational.

So the main point that I usually make to parents of students in our classes is that for science it is very important that a student learn in a way that they will remember things from year to year. You are not only building up your factual knowledge, but hopefully you are learning how to think. This way you can analyse questions and use your own understanding to answer them, rather than the totally awful practice of copying model answers that is unfortunately so popular in many places.

TeaBoh
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by TeaBoh » Thu Nov 12, 2015 1:14 am

Dr.Daniel wrote:
TeaBoh wrote:Will Sec 1 Science (Bio, Chemistry and Physics) be tested again in Sec 2 and Sec 3?
The short answer to this question is Yes.

Sec 1 Science covers the foundational topics. Sec 2 and Sec 3 also build on this foundation. In some cases the topics are separate. For example in physics it is typical for Sec 1 to cover Newtonian mechanics topics such as speed, forces and pressure (as well as other topics). In Sec 2 a typical topic is electricity which won't require you to remember all your Forces and Pressure knowledge from Sec 1. But forces and pressure will come up again in Sec 3 at a harder level of difficulty (and in JC at a harder level and in University at an even harder level). I suppose the joke here would be that you always have to deal with Pressure when studying physics.

Chemistry is also very cumulative in nature. You have to understand the basic Sec 1 Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and the Periodic Table basics before moving on to Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Equation writing, Mole Calculations etc that come is Sec 2 and Sec 3.

For Biology Sec 1 usually starts with cells and since so much of biology is based on things made up of cells, this as well is foundational.

So the main point that I usually make to parents of students in our classes is that for science it is very important that a student learn in a way that they will remember things from year to year. You are not only building up your factual knowledge, but hopefully you are learning how to think. This way you can analyse questions and use your own understanding to answer them, rather than the totally awful practice of copying model answers that is unfortunately so popular in many places.


:thankyou: Dr Daniel for answering my question.
:smile:

CatMoon
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by CatMoon » Thu Nov 12, 2015 11:01 am

Dr.Daniel wrote: The short answer to this question is Yes.

Sec 1 Science covers the foundational topics. Sec 2 and Sec 3 also build on this foundation. In some cases the topics are separate. For example in physics it is typical for Sec 1 to cover Newtonian mechanics topics such as speed, forces and pressure (as well as other topics). In Sec 2 a typical topic is electricity which won't require you to remember all your Forces and Pressure knowledge from Sec 1. But forces and pressure will come up again in Sec 3 at a harder level of difficulty (and in JC at a harder level and in University at an even harder level). I suppose the joke here would be that you always have to deal with Pressure when studying physics.

Chemistry is also very cumulative in nature. You have to understand the basic Sec 1 Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and the Periodic Table basics before moving on to Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Equation writing, Mole Calculations etc that come is Sec 2 and Sec 3.

For Biology Sec 1 usually starts with cells and since so much of biology is based on things made up of cells, this as well is foundational.

So the main point that I usually make to parents of students in our classes is that for science it is very important that a student learn in a way that they will remember things from year to year. You are not only building up your factual knowledge, but hopefully you are learning how to think. This way you can analyse questions and use your own understanding to answer them, rather than the totally awful practice of copying model answers that is unfortunately so popular in many places.
Dr Daniel,

Can you recommend where I can enroll my boy for Science practical lessons?
:please:


wendyk
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by wendyk » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:38 am

CatMoon wrote:
Dr.Daniel wrote: The short answer to this question is Yes.

Sec 1 Science covers the foundational topics. Sec 2 and Sec 3 also build on this foundation. In some cases the topics are separate. For example in physics it is typical for Sec 1 to cover Newtonian mechanics topics such as speed, forces and pressure (as well as other topics). In Sec 2 a typical topic is electricity which won't require you to remember all your Forces and Pressure knowledge from Sec 1. But forces and pressure will come up again in Sec 3 at a harder level of difficulty (and in JC at a harder level and in University at an even harder level). I suppose the joke here would be that you always have to deal with Pressure when studying physics.

Chemistry is also very cumulative in nature. You have to understand the basic Sec 1 Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and the Periodic Table basics before moving on to Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Equation writing, Mole Calculations etc that come is Sec 2 and Sec 3.

For Biology Sec 1 usually starts with cells and since so much of biology is based on things made up of cells, this as well is foundational.

So the main point that I usually make to parents of students in our classes is that for science it is very important that a student learn in a way that they will remember things from year to year. You are not only building up your factual knowledge, but hopefully you are learning how to think. This way you can analyse questions and use your own understanding to answer them, rather than the totally awful practice of copying model answers that is unfortunately so popular in many places.
Dr Daniel,

Can you recommend where I can enroll my boy for Science practical lessons?
:please:
Hi CatMoon, I was also thinking where I can send my boy for Science lab lessons! For you, what's your reason?
For me, my boy enjoys hands on a lot, he had been in his primary school years with Science Alive learning center which does Hands on experiments almost every week and he totally love it. What a waste if Sec Science is all about worksheets/tests :roll:

wendyk
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by wendyk » Sat Nov 14, 2015 1:38 am

CatMoon wrote:
Dr.Daniel wrote: The short answer to this question is Yes.

Sec 1 Science covers the foundational topics. Sec 2 and Sec 3 also build on this foundation. In some cases the topics are separate. For example in physics it is typical for Sec 1 to cover Newtonian mechanics topics such as speed, forces and pressure (as well as other topics). In Sec 2 a typical topic is electricity which won't require you to remember all your Forces and Pressure knowledge from Sec 1. But forces and pressure will come up again in Sec 3 at a harder level of difficulty (and in JC at a harder level and in University at an even harder level). I suppose the joke here would be that you always have to deal with Pressure when studying physics.

Chemistry is also very cumulative in nature. You have to understand the basic Sec 1 Elements, Compounds and Mixtures and the Periodic Table basics before moving on to Atomic Structure, Chemical Bonding, Equation writing, Mole Calculations etc that come is Sec 2 and Sec 3.

For Biology Sec 1 usually starts with cells and since so much of biology is based on things made up of cells, this as well is foundational.

So the main point that I usually make to parents of students in our classes is that for science it is very important that a student learn in a way that they will remember things from year to year. You are not only building up your factual knowledge, but hopefully you are learning how to think. This way you can analyse questions and use your own understanding to answer them, rather than the totally awful practice of copying model answers that is unfortunately so popular in many places.
Dr Daniel,

Can you recommend where I can enroll my boy for Science practical lessons?
:please:
Hi CatMoon, I was also thinking where I can send my boy for Science lab lessons! For you, what's your reason?
For me, my boy enjoys hands on a lot, he had been in his primary school years with Science Alive learning center which does Hands on experiments almost every week and he totally love it. What a waste if Sec Science is all about worksheets/tests :roll:

CatMoon
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by CatMoon » Mon Nov 16, 2015 10:38 am

Hi wendyk,

Yup, thought it would be good for ds to have extra practical lessons. Don't think they have sufficient lessons on this. :)

HAPPYH
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by HAPPYH » Mon Nov 16, 2015 4:22 pm

Following

Dr.Daniel
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Re: Lower Secondary Science

Post by Dr.Daniel » Tue Nov 17, 2015 1:07 pm

For those asking questions about classes, just PM me. I do not advertise in the forum posts. I just try to post interesting and helpful information.

But what you are all asking are good questions. Short experiements and hands on things are great to work into science lessons in the context of the syllabus. I like doing things that relate to the syllabus, so its not just about hands on. It is about how the hands on activities relate to what students are supposed to learn.

We were taking a break during our 3 hour Sec 1 Science (Chemistry) Holiday Class. We were drinking milo, so we decided to build a molecule that is in cocoa. The molecule pictured here is called Theobromine (which is a funny name because the element Bromine is not in the molecule). It is found in chocolate. We estimated more than a billion times a billion of these molecules exist in one cup of milo. The colors that represent the different atoms are: Black: Carbon, Red: Nitrogen, Yellow: Oxygen and White: Hydrogen. The chemical formula is C7H8N4O2. This molecule is very similar to caffeine and is also a mild stimulant. In any case this was a good opportunity to study the difference between atoms and molecules, and some details as to how atoms bond together in a molecule including double bonds and single bonds. Notice each carbon atom has 4 bonds, each nitrogen 3, each oxygen 2 and each hydrogen just one. We go over the Chemistry logic for this that we teach the students from the Periodic Table of the Elements.
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