Preschool that develops expressive confident speaking child

Looking for that infant/childcare, pre-school or student care with caring teachers or enrichments? Share your findings here.

Preschool that develops expressive confident speaking child

Postby FTM08 » Thu Jun 03, 2010 11:24 pm

Hi

Can anyone recommend a preschool (for a 2 1/2 year old) that develops an expressive and confident speaking child with good social skills and ability to think, especially one near or around Serangoon/Serangoon Gardens/Bishan/AMK or even Thomson?

I believe I can coach my child on the "hard" subjects myself so I'm looking for a school which focus is more on the "soft skills".

Does anyone know of any such schools?

Many thanks for your comments!

FTM08
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Apr 24, 2010 10:51 pm
Total Likes: 0


Preschool that develops expressive confident speaking child

Postby Mishasha » Tue Jun 15, 2010 11:40 am

Hi,

My gal is with Shaws@Braddel Heights - Lynwood Grove, opp NYJC.

http://www.shaws.com.sg/

Children are trained to be vocal, confident and fun-loving.

Mishasha
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Feb 25, 2009 11:24 am
Total Likes: 0


Re: Preschool that develops expressive confident speaking ch

Postby happydaddy » Wed Jun 16, 2010 12:21 am

Mishasha wrote:Hi,

My gal is with Shaws@Braddel Heights - Lynwood Grove, opp NYJC.

http://www.shaws.com.sg/

Children are trained to be vocal, confident and fun-loving.


bullshit lah...do not be naive...

unless you pay extra $$ to attend enrichment, if not, pls scan thru the centre curriculum and you will know. Most of the CC provide only minimum care to meet the MCYS guideline.

Unless the centre has R&D to work on the curriculum, if not, those small player, how reliable their 'extra' curriculum can be?

happydaddy
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 200
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 8:44 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby Guest » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:05 am

Show and tell alone does not build character. In fact one of the things I have observed negatively about kids today is that 90% of them are vocal but they are terribly rude and speak irresponsibly.

So if adults have no time to coach manners in children, then "confident speakers" are just opening a can of bad worms and they will eventually haunt you and outspeak the parents even. So my suggestion is develop confident speakers and at the same time they have to know to speak responsibly and not use their speaking ability in the wrong way to argue, quarrel, retort adults/teachers or verbally abuse their friends.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 16, 2010 11:31 am

Please do not assume, I am not living in a well nor come from the mountain.

I know the keeness of promoting children to speak their mind and be confident but with the lack of proper values guidance, it defeats the purpose of delivering so many other skills training for a child when the core skill of behaviour is lacking.

I am not against children being confident speakers, in fact that is successfully achieved todate for most children with all the enrichment courses. However, what is still lacking is this sense of knowing when to speak what correctly in terms of manners. Of course if adults cannot even know how to do that effectively as seen in many incidences of disputes through all the articles readily published in all medias, then that leaves very little room for children to learn the right way.

Empty vessels make the most noise is what I want to share about confident speakers without substance. So my point is focus on developing a child's heart, not only the perceivable skills on the outside but in tandem, that would make a great child.

I am sorry to say I face many young confident speakers regularly but I am not impressed.
Guest
 


Postby Guest » Wed Jun 16, 2010 12:46 pm

insider wrote:Most ‘monsters’ are built by parents and not by schools per se and schools need to make this assumption that parents (such as the Thread Starter and many other parents reading here) are wise enough to do the right thing to their kids at home in terms of their manners, morality, etc, when the schools are planning the curriculum. I will be very sad if my assumption on this is wrong...



It takes a village to raise a child and if a child spends more time in enrichment or school than at home, then everyone plays a part.

The truth is if schools keep assuming that this is a role of the parents alone, then children keep getting away with misdeeds in schools.

I am not assuming anything here, just reminding that while it is good to train confident speakers, be mindful of its consequence if everything is not done in tandem. People forget to do some things not because they are lack in wisdom but because they have no time....all time spent in learning skills relevant to academics.
Last edited by Guest on Wed Jun 16, 2010 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Guest
 

Postby Guest » Wed Jun 16, 2010 12:58 pm

FTM08, just in case we have gone off topic...no..
Here are some references for you to consider.

well-known Pre-School around Thomson:

Cherie hearts, 34 westlake
Junior Schoolhouse, 33 westlake
Marymount kindy
Guest
 

Postby happydaddy » Wed Jun 16, 2010 4:12 pm

ksi wrote:
insider wrote:Most ‘monsters’ are built by parents and not by schools per se and schools need to make this assumption that parents (such as the Thread Starter and many other parents reading here) are wise enough to do the right thing to their kids at home in terms of their manners, morality, etc, when the schools are planning the curriculum. I will be very sad if my assumption on this is wrong...



It takes a village to raise a child and if a child spends more time in enrichment or school than at home, then everyone plays a part.

The truth is if schools keep assuming that this is a role of the parents alone, then children keep getting away with misdeeds in schools.

I am not assuming anything here, just reminding that while it is good to train confident speakers, be mindful of its consequence if everything is not done in tandem. People forget to do some things not because they are lack in wisdom but because they have no time....all time spent in learning skills relevant to academics.


if the parents give the school discipline authority, then yr above statement is true.

if not, there is nothing the school can do if your kid behave badly beside scolding them...

happydaddy
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 200
Joined: Fri Apr 24, 2009 8:44 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby mrswongtuition » Wed Jun 16, 2010 8:43 pm

An expressive child is good if they have good sense to know what they can say and what they can't.

I have seen kids who are expressive but they know when to stop and they know what they should not be saying in certain scenarios. They are often respected by others, peers their age and even adults.

However, there are those who are so expressive that they do not have self control and end up embarrassing themselves, their parents and others around them.

I would love for my son to be an expressive boy. However, we will also teach him manners and courtesy. Talk only when it's his turn and think carefully before he talks. It's a fine balance because the school will give them opportunity to be expressive, however, it's beyond their control on how the child 'applies' it.

mrswongtuition
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1835
Joined: Sun Apr 26, 2009 5:02 pm
Total Likes: 0



Return to Child Care, Kindergartens, Student Care