All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

School terms keep kids in school and parents sane. Holidays can be boring to kids if they are left alone. Discuss vacation ideas and how to make good use of the free time for both children and adults.
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slmkhoo
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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by slmkhoo » Sat May 25, 2019 8:31 pm

My girls took their first flight at 5 months and 2 months old respectively, and flew several times a year until their teens. So I am extremely experienced!

For a 2.5yo, I would go for a stroller - they are too heavy to carry even in a sling, etc. And there's a lot of walking in airports. Go for the lightest and most easily folded one you can find, and train your child to stay in it without fussing. The smaller your stroller, the more likely you'll be able to use it at your destination, especially in Asia. Some of the monster strollers I see around these days will only work in western countries with wide pathways. Some airlines will let you use the stroller right up to the gate, then return it as soon as you disembark (not with the rest of the luggage). But not all are so helpful, so you should ask first. Since you are travelling as a family, let 1 adult watch the child, bring him around to see things etc, while the other does most of the queuing and handling the paperwork.

Don't give candy! Kids often get hyper with too much sugar, and you really don't want that on on a long flight, or any flight. But do bring some snacks as your child may not be able to wait for the meal to be served, or may not like what is served. Eating or drinking during take-off and landing also helps equalise the pressure in the ears which makes some kids cry. I used to bring some small sandwiches (with fillings that don't spoil, and eat those first) and raisins and crackers for my kids - compact and easy to feed.

Bring some small (silent!) toys and books to entertain him, and paper and crayons. Don't bring anything with separate parts as you are bound to lose some, and don't bring anything messy. And don't bring them all out at the same time - offer one at a time, and keep one when you offer the next so they stay "fresh". Bring some old favourites, and also a couple of new items. If you wrap them up, that buys you time as he will need to unwrap them (but pick up the litter). And after you arrive, put away at least a few out of sight for the flight back! If your child has a "sleep toy" or blanket or whatever, bring that on board (but you may want to get him used to something small and packable before your trip). And don't lose it!

If you can, try to time the flight for when the child is usually asleep (eg. afternoon or night), but not so late that he will be super-cranky. Exhaust him by letting him walk and play before boarding, and hopefully he will spend most of the flight sleeping. For a child that age, go for a short flight - there are quite a lot of places you can go under 3 hrs.

No, it's not very relaxing, at least when en route! But holidays build lots of memories (both good and bad, I must confess), but they're good for recounting to your kids when they are teens and older. Try to make the holiday itself free and easy, with lots of down time and play time, rather than trying to fit in a lot of sightseeing. To make the holiday less stressful, it's important to inculcate good behaviour in your child at home under normal circumstances - minimising tantrums, reasonable levels of obedience, flexibility about foods, learning that "no" means "no, not wandering away (or use a harness or wrist leash), etc. Then although he will likely act up somewhat when he's tired or in unfamiliar places, it won't be too bad. If he's used to whining and throwing tantrums to get his way, and it works at home, he will likely do it even more when cranky or under stress. And you can't unbuckle a child during takeoff or landing, no matter how loudly he screams.

floppy
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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by floppy » Sun May 26, 2019 4:38 pm

slmkhoo wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 8:31 pm
My girls took their first flight at 5 months and 2 months old respectively, and flew several times a year until their teens. So I am extremely experienced!
...
No, it's not very relaxing, at least when en route! But holidays build lots of memories (both good and bad, I must confess), but they're good for recounting to your kids when they are teens and older. Try to make the holiday itself free and easy, with lots of down time and play time, rather than trying to fit in a lot of sightseeing. To make the holiday less stressful, it's important to inculcate good behaviour in your child at home under normal circumstances - minimising tantrums, reasonable levels of obedience, flexibility about foods, learning that "no" means "no, not wandering away (or use a harness or wrist leash), etc. Then although he will likely act up somewhat when he's tired or in unfamiliar places, it won't be too bad. If he's used to whining and throwing tantrums to get his way, and it works at home, he will likely do it even more when cranky or under stress. And you can't unbuckle a child during takeoff or landing, no matter how loudly he screams.
Same same. My eldest started flying at 6 months, no. 2 at 3 months and no. 3 at 2 months old. They get progressively younger and we also started travelling as a bigger pack - from being a couple to 3 to 4 to 5.

An important lesson in travelling with kids is to forget about itinerary... or at least be prepared to make changes to your itinerary on the fly. Kids can get easily distracted or attracted by things that you may not have planned. Therefore, I totally agree to "make the holiday itself free and easy, with lots of down time and play time, rather than trying to fit in a lot of sightseeing". If your idea about holidaying with kids is ticking off a checklist, you are probably doing it wrong. Have fun, spend time together and enjoy :boogie:

slmkhoo wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 8:31 pm
...
For a 2.5yo, I would go for a stroller - they are too heavy to carry even in a sling, etc.
While a stroller is better, it's still possible to carry a toodler in a carrier. Many brands, including the very popular Tula carrier, has toddler version which can carry up to 25kg in a number of carrying positions. May not be as easy as a stroller, but for some places where stroller can be a nightmare, a carrier beats carrying them around all day.

BranT
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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by BranT » Mon Jul 01, 2019 10:38 am

slmkhoo wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 8:31 pm
My girls took their first flight at 5 months and 2 months old respectively, and flew several times a year until their teens. So I am extremely experienced!

For a 2.5yo, I would go for a stroller - they are too heavy to carry even in a sling, etc. And there's a lot of walking in airports. Go for the lightest and most easily folded one you can find, and train your child to stay in it without fussing. The smaller your stroller, the more likely you'll be able to use it at your destination, especially in Asia. Some of the monster strollers I see around these days will only work in western countries with wide pathways. Some airlines will let you use the stroller right up to the gate, then return it as soon as you disembark (not with the rest of the luggage). But not all are so helpful, so you should ask first. Since you are travelling as a family, let 1 adult watch the child, bring him around to see things etc, while the other does most of the queuing and handling the paperwork.

Don't give candy! Kids often get hyper with too much sugar, and you really don't want that on on a long flight, or any flight. But do bring some snacks as your child may not be able to wait for the meal to be served, or may not like what is served. Eating or drinking during take-off and landing also helps equalise the pressure in the ears which makes some kids cry. I used to bring some small sandwiches (with fillings that don't spoil, and eat those first) and raisins and crackers for my kids - compact and easy to feed.

Bring some small (silent!) toys and books to entertain him, and paper and crayons. Don't bring anything with separate parts as you are bound to lose some, and don't bring anything messy. And don't bring them all out at the same time - offer one at a time, and keep one when you offer the next so they stay "fresh". Bring some old favourites, and also a couple of new items. If you wrap them up, that buys you time as he will need to unwrap them (but pick up the litter). And after you arrive, put away at least a few out of sight for the flight back! If your child has a "sleep toy" or blanket or whatever, bring that on board (but you may want to get him used to something small and packable before your trip). And don't lose it!

If you can, try to time the flight for when the child is usually asleep (eg. afternoon or night), but not so late that he will be super-cranky. Exhaust him by letting him walk and play before boarding, and hopefully he will spend most of the flight sleeping. For a child that age, go for a short flight - there are quite a lot of places you can go under 3 hrs.

No, it's not very relaxing, at least when en route! But holidays build lots of memories (both good and bad, I must confess), but they're good for recounting to your kids when they are teens and older. Try to make the holiday itself free and easy, with lots of down time and play time, rather than trying to fit in a lot of sightseeing. To make the holiday less stressful, it's important to inculcate good behaviour in your child at home under normal circumstances - minimising tantrums, reasonable levels of obedience, flexibility about foods, learning that "no" means "no, not wandering away (or use a harness or wrist leash), etc. Then although he will likely act up somewhat when he's tired or in unfamiliar places, it won't be too bad. If he's used to whining and throwing tantrums to get his way, and it works at home, he will likely do it even more when cranky or under stress. And you can't unbuckle a child during takeoff or landing, no matter how loudly he screams.
Good read! Thank you so much for sharing your experiences.. We are planning to travel this year with our 2 year old son.. this will be the first time that we'll travel with him. Reading this gives me a lot of encouragement and I'm more than ready to travel now. :D :goodpost:

breatheandgrow
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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by breatheandgrow » Wed Sep 25, 2019 2:21 am

slmkhoo wrote:
Sat May 25, 2019 8:31 pm
My girls took their first flight at 5 months and 2 months old respectively, and flew several times a year until their teens. So I am extremely experienced!

For a 2.5yo, I would go for a stroller - they are too heavy to carry even in a sling, etc. And there's a lot of walking in airports. Go for the lightest and most easily folded one you can find, and train your child to stay in it without fussing. The smaller your stroller, the more likely you'll be able to use it at your destination, especially in Asia. Some of the monster strollers I see around these days will only work in western countries with wide pathways. Some airlines will let you use the stroller right up to the gate, then return it as soon as you disembark (not with the rest of the luggage). But not all are so helpful, so you should ask first. Since you are travelling as a family, let 1 adult watch the child, bring him around to see things etc, while the other does most of the queuing and handling the paperwork.

Don't give candy! Kids often get hyper with too much sugar, and you really don't want that on on a long flight, or any flight. But do bring some snacks as your child may not be able to wait for the meal to be served, or may not like what is served. Eating or drinking during take-off and landing also helps equalise the pressure in the ears which makes some kids cry. I used to bring some small sandwiches (with fillings that don't spoil, and eat those first) and raisins and crackers for my kids - compact and easy to feed.

Bring some small (silent!) toys and books to entertain him, and paper and crayons. Don't bring anything with separate parts as you are bound to lose some, and don't bring anything messy. And don't bring them all out at the same time - offer one at a time, and keep one when you offer the next so they stay "fresh". Bring some old favourites, and also a couple of new items. If you wrap them up, that buys you time as he will need to unwrap them (but pick up the litter). And after you arrive, put away at least a few out of sight for the flight back! If your child has a "sleep toy" or blanket or whatever, bring that on board (but you may want to get him used to something small and packable before your trip). And don't lose it!

If you can, try to time the flight for when the child is usually asleep (eg. afternoon or night), but not so late that he will be super-cranky. Exhaust him by letting him walk and play before boarding, and hopefully he will spend most of the flight sleeping. For a child that age, go for a short flight - there are quite a lot of places you can go under 3 hrs.

No, it's not very relaxing, at least when en route! But holidays build lots of memories (both good and bad, I must confess), but they're good for recounting to your kids when they are teens and older. Try to make the holiday itself free and easy, with lots of down time and play time, rather than trying to fit in a lot of sightseeing. To make the holiday less stressful, it's important to inculcate good behaviour in your child at home under normal circumstances - minimising tantrums, reasonable levels of obedience, flexibility about foods, learning that "no" means "no, not wandering away (or use a harness or wrist leash), etc. Then although he will likely act up somewhat when he's tired or in unfamiliar places, it won't be too bad. If he's used to whining and throwing tantrums to get his way, and it works at home, he will likely do it even more when cranky or under stress. And you can't unbuckle a child during takeoff or landing, no matter how loudly he screams.

Totally agree! My kids also have been traveling frequently with us since they were babies. Carriers are so important but after a certain weight, strollers are a better choice. Pockkit is so portable and light for traveling. We even sling it at times when we had to manage the luggage’s and kids. We find it useful even for crowded Hong Kong and snowy Hokkaido. Yes, don’t over pack the itinerary, lots of downtime for sanity.

Gilian039
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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by Gilian039 » Wed Sep 25, 2019 9:36 am

I am wondering if these expectant mothers aren't afraid to travel even if they are on their last sem of their pregnancy? I fear for their safety and I could not bear to imagine giving birth while you are in a plane.


code thinking academy
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Re:

Post by code thinking academy » Mon Nov 04, 2019 3:41 pm

Thanks!
schellen wrote:
Fri Mar 05, 2010 1:24 pm
I flew twice before when I was pregnant with DD1 in 2001 and DD2 in 2009. I didn't have to produce any letter. The 1st time was in the 5th month and the 2nd time was in the 3rd month. However, I flew on SIA and JAL respectively.

From what I understand, airlines will only ask for the letter in the later part of the 3rd trimester. You can still consult your gynae to check whether it's safe for you to travel, especially if he/she thinks you may have a complicated pregnancy.

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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by code thinking academy » Tue Nov 05, 2019 11:38 am

I traveled by tiger airline several years before when I was 1 month pregnant.
staypositive wrote:
Thu Mar 04, 2010 5:22 pm
Has anyone flown Tiger Airways before while pregnant?

Must you produce a letter from doctor to say that you are fit for travel before your 30th week? If they insist, at which point do they check this? During check-in? How much does your gynae charge for this letter?

Accordingly to their website, this letter is needed from 30th to 35th week onwards. No flight after that. But silent on what they need before 30th week..other than to inform the call centre reservations or they have right to refuse carriage

emm.. have been on hold on their line for 30 minutes now... still counting...can't get through to talk to anyone.

hope someone can help here.

Was on Airasia flight 2 weeks ago, it's simple & easy, hassle-free. Just get the limited liability form either at check-in or on board, sign it and pass back to them.

Michy79
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Re: All About Travelling Pregnant Or With Kids

Post by Michy79 » Tue Nov 05, 2019 6:33 pm

As long as it is not yet your third trimester and you have a OB permission, The airline will let you travel.

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