Sleeping in Sarong.

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Sleeping in Sarong.

Postby serena » Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:30 pm

My child have problem sleeping in baby cot...need to use pacifier, rock till she's fast asleep then carefully put her in the cot....very tiring. Otherwise, she refused to sleep in the cot day or night. Someone recommend using sarong to help her sleep. But is sleeping in sarong bad for the spine?
Any one has any experiences on this...can share?

serena
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Re: Sleeping in Sarong.

Postby ChiefKiasu » Tue Nov 11, 2008 12:56 pm

serena wrote:My child have problem sleeping in baby cot...need to use pacifier, rock till she's fast asleep then carefully put her in the cot....very tiring. Otherwise, she refused to sleep in the cot day or night. Someone recommend using sarong to help her sleep. But is sleeping in sarong bad for the spine?
Any one has any experiences on this...can share?


I spent my entire babyhood in sarong. I think my spine is warped more because of the time I spend in front of the computer than from my sarong days. Also, another myth is that sarongs allow babies heads to be nicely shaped (nice and round). Dunno whether that is true.

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Re: Sleeping in Sarong.

Postby ZacK » Tue Nov 11, 2008 1:25 pm

ChiefKiasu wrote:another myth is that sarongs allow babies heads to be nicely shaped (nice and round). Dunno whether that is true.


Definitely a myth cos the back of my head is flat :S And I grew up sleeping in a sarong too... I guess it's quite common to have babies sleep in sarongs for our generation. In fact my mum who looked after my nephew/nieces also prescribed sarongs but that was the late 1970s and 1980s era.

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Postby JHJC » Tue Nov 11, 2008 1:35 pm

eh,... My Children sleep sarong too.... i figure if i grew up ok, they shld be ok too! hahahah

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Postby yat23yat23 » Tue Nov 11, 2008 4:07 pm

my son also slept in sarong till he turned 3. he refuse to sleep on my bed and in the baby cot. we tried swaying him in our arms till he's fast asleep but when we put him on the bed/baby cot, he'll wake up and cry. so far, no side effects. so should be safe.

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Postby yat23yat23 » Tue Nov 11, 2008 4:09 pm

dun forget to place a mattress underneath the sarong for safety purpose.

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Postby heutistmeintag » Wed Nov 12, 2008 1:31 am

I think sleeping in sarong for 2 reasons
1) better ventilation as babies sometimes cannot turn properly in baby cot and they get warm
2) the bouncing makes the baby comfortable with the familiar floating feeling in the mommy's womb.

My son slept in sarong during day and switched to bed at night (aircon) lol.
My daughter was trained to sleep in cot from day1 but becoz she sleep on her tummy, she kenna flatten nose which was a pity coz she has narrow nose when she was born.

My advice also to avoid the pacifier early coz they could cause crooked teeth. My son had this problem until the (crooked) baby teeth dropped off and the new ones grew ok. What a relief - imagine son with crooked teeth and daughter with flatten nose. Yeah, I told her she can go for plastic surgery to fix her nose when she grows up. :mrgreen:

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Sleeping in sarong & Pacifier

Postby serena » Wed Nov 12, 2008 7:49 am

For those who have baby sleeping in sarong, can share how old did your kid baby until and it's difficult to switch the kid (when grown up) back to child bed eventually?

As for the pacifier, my baby is already used to it now.
Is it difficult to wean off the pacifier later old?
How to do it and around what age to do it?

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Postby cnimed » Thu Nov 13, 2008 2:17 pm

I think it's best to let the child use the bed at least occasionally. If nothing else, when you're travelling it will be much easier.


DS1 slept in sarong only for naps. During night time he slept with me. If we were travelling he would just sleep on the bed, no problem. When he was about 8 months old, he started rejecting the sarong and transited to the bed full-time. I think he wanted to stretch out. He was very fat. I had no problem with safety though since he would always just call out and then lie quietly, waiting for someone to get him. After that I would put him on the bed so that he can stretch himself.

DS2 never slept well in the sarong becuase he always needed to turn halfway through his sleep and he couldn't do that in a sarong. He started turning when he was 2 months old so it was both irritating to him and not very safe to be in a sarong. he would thrash and cry. We now sleep on a mattress on the floor so he can enjoy some independence with regards to sleeping. He will climb onto the mattress and lie down when he wants to sleep, and after he wakes up, he will just get up and walk out of the room.

Never used the pacifier so can't help you there!
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Postby winth » Thu Nov 13, 2008 3:06 pm

Hi Serena,

Both my boys slept in bed/mattress since day 1. Read something about sleeping in sarong will cause spinal damage and risks to brain damage due to excessive rocking. But didn't know if that's true. Plus the fact that it will be difficult to change them to bed later on, so did not even start on sarong.

As for weaning of pacifier:
For DS1 was alot easier, I just told him when he was about 20 months old that 'old babies do not need pacifiers as they cause tooth decay'. That night, I said 'bye bye' to his pacifier, he merely slept that very night without requesting it back. Children do understand what you say, just that they like to challenge your limit.

For DS2 was more challenging than I thought, opposite character from his elder brother. Used the same trick like DS1 when he turned 17 months, but it didn't work, cried like :twisted:.
So, I used the 'crying out' method - Ferber Method. I basically took out his pacifier, told him no more and that's it. I left his room. The crying will be tough, lasted a week (for my DS2's case), and then it's goodbye to pacifier for him. Now he sleeps without any pacifier. Just milk, then he would turn and go to sleep by himself. No need to pat.
Once, I tried to give him pacifier (to test him), he spit it out immediately and looked at it like it's something weird. :lol:

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