Identifying Children With Special Needs

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Identifying Children With Special Needs

Postby winth » Fri Feb 13, 2009 11:00 pm

[Moderator's note: Topic split from another thread.]

Hi jedamum,

Maybe I've been overly pessismistic or super kiasu. I have looked up loads of articles on ADHD and autism. Bec I had suspected ADHD for my 2nd and autism for my 1st. Even had my friend who teaches in pte schools for autism to come look at my DS1's behaviour.

From your description, it's not ADHD. A common sight of ADHD is when the child likes climbing high places and jumping around, usually at such heights that the child will usually injure himself.

The route that your boy took looks safe and highly meditated, it's normal activity level lar...

My DS2 actually doesn't want my DS1 to take care of him/ boss him around leh. So, it's a different situation. DS2 seems to have an idea of what he wants while DS1 couldn't be too bothered with him. So on a normal day, both boys are busy with their own stuff... sometimes I wonder if the age gap of 4 years was the cause.

winth
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Postby jedamum » Sat Feb 14, 2009 12:38 am

winth wrote:From your description, it's not ADHD. A common sight of ADHD is when the child likes climbing high places and jumping around, usually at such heights that the child will usually injure himself.
.

As for climbing high places, just last week, i was watching tv and it gets too quiet. so i took a peek and found my ds2 sitting on top of our shoe shelve (it's a four tier wooden shelf), playing with the fire extinguisher we placed on top of it. :!:
i carried him down and prompt him to do it again - he used a small stool (as i had taught him how to reach higher places) to reach the first shelf plank and then use the open shelf plank as the ladder.
usually he doesn't hurt himself cos i was usually quite vigilant when he goes too quiet - up to no good! :wink:
we see his agility and being 'daring' as his potential leh. :D

winth wrote:sometimes I wonder if the age gap of 4 years was the cause.

think it has more to do with character (or horoscope? :wink:) than age gap..cos my boys also 4 years apart. maybe when the younger one gets older, he'll exercise more independence and that is when the bickering may start. so i'll enjoy the peace while it last!

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Hyperactivity

Postby buds » Fri Feb 27, 2009 2:24 pm

jedamum wrote:
winth wrote:Initially I thought that my 2nd boy is ADHD becos he is just so stubborn and 'hyper', he just doesn't sleep and is always doing things. He gets really frustrated when it's not done properly... Imagine the kind of stress and energy to watch over him...

My 2nd boy is just as active...as of now, he is standing at the edge of the sofa watching TV :| backside have pins. ask him to come, he'll go a detour and climb obstacles (a parked car/stool) before coming to me. bedtime is an hour...he'll walk round and round the bedroom (risking stepping on his bro) until he exhaust all ounce of energy then he'll lie down and sleep.

I refuse to believe his has ADHD leh. He's just being active.

We are definitely stopping at 2. I just had a long nap (drift in and out of consciousness actually) just now. The elder bro fed the younger one lunch, poured him juice, read to him, play with him while i napped. It is a far cry from 2 years ago when the elder one kept pestering me to accompany him to play - now he has a dedicated playmate and fan. It's no wonder he resist having another sibling...he said will make me and him busy. :wink:


winth wrote:Hi jedamum,

Maybe I've been overly pessismistic or super kiasu. I have looked up loads of articles on ADHD and autism. Bec I had suspected ADHD for my 2nd and autism for my 1st. Even had my friend who teaches in pte schools for autism to come look at my DS1's behaviour.

From your description, it's not ADHD. A common sight of ADHD is when the child likes climbing high places and jumping around, usually at such heights that the child will usually injure himself.

The route that your boy took looks safe and highly meditated, it's normal activity level lar...

My DS2 actually doesn't want my DS1 to take care of him/ boss him around leh. So, it's a different situation. DS2 seems to have an idea of what he wants while DS1 couldn't be too bothered with him. So on a normal day, both boys are busy with their own stuff... sometimes I wonder if the age gap of 4 years was the cause.


PROBLEMS WITH HYPERACTIVITY

Not all children with ADHD are hyperactive.
A good many, in fact, show normal activity
levels or may even be underactive.

However, you can't miss the ones who ARE
hyperactive. Preschool children with ADHD
are always touching something, darting abt,
rarely satisfied, hardly ever sticking with one
thing for very long and needing supervision.

Fortunately, hyperactivity is often at its worst
in young children. As children get older they
tend to slow down. Phew..
:faint:

In preschool, the child's activity level changes
from running to restless. Fidgeting, squirming,
shuffling geet, drumming fingers, playing with
something all the time, talking, making noises,
tipping the chair back, getting up, and walking
around the room are typical descriptions by
teachers of the hyperactive children in their
class. :stupid:

Hyperactive girls may display in less physical
ways, primarily through excessive talking. :lol:

As the ADHD child goes thru' adolescence,
obvious characteristics of hyperactivity
become more subtle. A wagging foot, tapping
pencil, or talkativeness may be signs of the
teenager's restlessness.

The important thing to remember is that
NOT ALL children with ADHD are hyperactive. :wink:

buds
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Postby winth » Fri Feb 27, 2009 3:05 pm

Hi buds,

thanks for the info.
been quite worried as ADHD seems to come in many forms.
but my friend, plus my other friend who teaches in autism sch all say DS2 got no symptoms of ADHD, just more active than DS1 (who is inactive at all). But I'll be watching out for those symptoms in your post. Thanks, once again!

Err... DS2 is currently delayed in speech. So I'll be checking out what is happening too. You got any idea in this area? He's almost 2, but he can't really respond in speech. Yes, he makes noises, but the words he says are muffled. Sorta like, instead of Daddy/Dada/Da, he says Narrdy. Instead of Seven, he says vven. Doctor says he's not short-tongue leh. Some words he can answer accurately, i.e. ball, ty (for auntie), ah ma (for grandma), but seems like sounds of letters for D, S, T, it comes in muffled noises.

Both my sons are delayed in walking and delayed in speech. But DS2 more obvious than DS1, DS2 started walking when he's about 15/16 months. DS1 talked only after he turned 20 months, but his pronunciation is accurate, so wasn't too worried. DS2, think he's trying to talk, but not as accurate as those in his classes. DS2 responds well to our instructions, so don't think hearing got problem.

winth
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Postby buds » Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:08 pm

[Moderator's note: Topic selected for Portal publication.]

winth wrote:Hi buds,

thanks for the info.
been quite worried as ADHD seems to come in many forms.
but my friend, plus my other friend who teaches in autism sch all say DS2 got no symptoms of ADHD, just more active than DS1 (who is inactive at all). But I'll be watching out for those symptoms in your post. Thanks, once again!

Err... DS2 is currently delayed in speech. So I'll be checking out what is happening too. You got any idea in this area? He's almost 2, but he can't really respond in speech. Yes, he makes noises, but the words he says are muffled. Sorta like, instead of Daddy/Dada/Da, he says Narrdy. Instead of Seven, he says vven. Doctor says he's not short-tongue leh. Some words he can answer accurately, i.e. ball, ty (for auntie), ah ma (for grandma), but seems like sounds of letters for D, S, T, it comes in muffled noises.

Both my sons are delayed in walking and delayed in speech. But DS2 more obvious than DS1, DS2 started walking when he's about 15/16 months. DS1 talked only after he turned 20 months, but his pronunciation is accurate, so wasn't too worried. DS2, think he's trying to talk, but not as accurate as those in his classes. DS2 responds well to our instructions, so don't think hearing got problem.


Try not to rule out hearing problems right away..

A past student of mine in parent-child playgroup session
has this experience. Think to share with you...

The child is 20 mths old. Handsome kid with long fine
straight shoulder length hair. Comes in fancy branded
outfits. Extremely cute. Mom sports a simple tie-back,
shorts and spaghetti strapped top. And i will always recognise
the Cartier on her ring finger... A very classy mom.

Class duration is one hour. We usually have 2 teachers rotating
amongst parents with working the materials on the shelves, sharing
Montessori ideas for learning in the home and the Montessori
methodology itself or at times just some housewife indulgences
on how they cope with the children at home.

I can sense the mom of this boy seem bored as the child kept at doing
only one thing... Only one thing each time... And when she wants to
introduce new material, the child insist on working with it some more until
its like almost time for music and movement session then he may decide
to swap for another. Child also does not seem to enjoy music. He like
just follows the flow. Mum holds his hand, gives him a nudge or moves
him bodily, to get him going with the actions. The child at one glance -
is a down sydrome child also born with a cleft lip and a leg shorter than
the other. But - a dashing young boy.

He doesn't speak. Even if he does - muffled sounds or sounds coming
from his throat... forced... esp when frustrated. No coherent words.
Almost NO eye-contact at all times. When it comes to instructions his
mum will hold his hand and repeat the instruction i last gave. Does
not clap or has the ability to aprreciate a clap.

I decided to work this material called the sound box.


Image


Comes in box of 6 cylindrical containers, one box blue and one red for
matching activity. We usually introduce only one box first to teach the
concept of loud and soft. Follwed by gradation of sounds - soft, softer,
softest and loud, louder, loudest...

Each cylinder is filled with objects which when shaken produces a
different sound. For example, one big marble, a teaspoon of soy
beans, a teaspoon of rice, etc.

The mom finally came out of her tolerance shell and sent in her
withdrawal, quoting signs of no improvement since day one which
was a few months back way before i was working there. I accepted
her withdrawal and just resumed the activity. While i was working i
chatted her up and asked what he does at home, what he likes, etc
Then, came her sharings... what her worries were... the why's and
the how's... I told her i wanted to show her something and worked
the sound box with her child. I whispered to her... when we work
with children they will usually offer small signs or indications that
they like or dislike something or mebbe just trying to tell us some-
thing... catch those moments, while playing together...

He was fascinated with the material, couldn wait to begin touching.
I insist he look me in the eye by touching his arm. when he looked
up, i shook the first one and he copied. Then smiled... I continued
till all the cylinders were shaken, each time repeating the sound
twice - ie. this is loud.... loud.... He repeated only the actions but
not the sound. He became excited. He felt something shaking inside
the cylinders and kept shaking each one intensely. I repeated the
action to shake near his ear. He did so. But with the one big marble.
It became to loud to endure... but he kept shaking it. I told the mom
this material is best used to detect hearing defiency in children and
it seems that her son cannot is not able to hear a sound that loud,
hence his shaking gets harder and harder... and cudn stop.

I asked his mom what abt other common illnesses , does he recover
quickly... she says nope, when having runny nose and cough, always
got prolonged phlegm until sometimes lead to bronchitis. Once she
didn't realise his tonsils were so inflamed that she had to get one re-
moved.. has heart surgery before as an infant. And the list went on..
I advised her to quickly go to ENT for thorough check up.

Next 2 wks, didn't see him. Third week, they came. Him with small
hearing aide and a cast on his shorter leg. So cute... Still so handsome
and getting chubbier. Mom came straight to me and said doc confirmed
ear defect which wasn't so clearly detected first time round, but after
much insistence for a more thorough check and got it fixed with a small
day surgery thingy then the cast - something abt levelling the two legs.
I was not sure how that was done.

Mom shared... he shouts a bit now. But clear shouts of NO or YES and
most times now... a slow but coherent maaaammm....mmaaa.. Cause,
the sounds the child hears are now louder and clearer than before.

With a tear in her eye, she said thanks... and squeezed my arm. She said
it was her last session for the day and she reali wanted to come to say
goodbye. Actually, one more session to go...but the child had a scheduled
heart surgery in US. She promised me she will spend more time with
her son from now on and watch out for small signs that he may be
showing her. :wink:

I gave her a quick follow up on how to coach her child to be independent
with sight word cards and so on as he's still adapting to the louder sounds
in his current hearing. I shared with her he will slowly be able to articu-
late the whole sound of the words he hears now, instead of usually just
the faint ending sounds of words or sentences that makes his sounds
come out muffled or incoherent. To be patient and speak to him slowly
so that he catches everything she tries to convey to him.

I hugged him and signed his cute cast. On his way out, he turned his head
round to me and smiled. This time when mom ask him to wave goodbye,
he did. :love: Mum said thank you and hugged me... she whispered, i am having a 2nd child soon via IVF. Its a miracle.

I hope he's doing well now.
If not for Cartier mom, dun think he cud afford so many major
operations in such a short time... if not for Cartier stay home
mum, he wudn't have made so much progress in such a short
time. Take time to stop, look and listen.

STOP - Drop everything we're doing and concentrate on the child.
LOOK - Observe all the developments achieved and look out for
improvements in other weak areas.
LISTEN - Take time to listen... your child is trying to tell you something
each and everyday...

We don't have to have Cartier to be an active parent to our
children's development. Tho Cartier will sure as heck help a lot
along the way... Ahak! :wink:

Cheerios.
:celebrate:

buds
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Postby winth » Fri Feb 27, 2009 4:42 pm

Wow, great stuff!
Thanks for the share!

The pedia suggested speech therapy and a 2nd hearing test should he show no signs of speech improvement when he hits 24 months - 2 more months to go, stressed...

In school and at home, he responds well, can even argue with brother. No signs of 'not looking into the eye', poor 'hand-eye coordination' or inability to recognise shapes/colors. He loves music and speed reading when in Shichida, able to copy the rhythm when singing. Looks like a perfect normal child too.

It's just this speech issue that got us quite worried.

winth
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Postby buds » Fri Feb 27, 2009 5:29 pm

winth wrote:Wow, great stuff!
Thanks for the share!

The pedia suggested speech therapy and a 2nd hearing test should he show no signs of speech improvement when he hits 24 months - 2 more months to go, stressed...

In school and at home, he responds well, can even argue with brother. No signs of 'not looking into the eye', poor 'hand-eye coordination' or inability to recognise shapes/colors. He loves music and speed reading when in Shichida, able to copy the rhythm when singing. Looks like a perfect normal child too.

It's just this speech issue that got us quite worried.



In general, we are usually more KS with our first born.
Must quickly walk. Must quickly talk. Must quickly everything.
Come second we either take it easy or become more KS.

Judging from the above observation carefully done by you,
my wonderful mummy... mebbe ds2 is not ready to voice out.
Seems like a normal happy growing child to me too! :wink:

My K2 started speaking clearly and like a bullet train at 3yrs old.
So, beware... don't try to shut ds2 up when he starts yakking away... :lol:

Its nice of your friends to help you assess and offer guidance.
Its nice that you are aware of your children's developmental progress.
Keep speaking to him regularly and read to him.. The more he picks
up from you, the more he absorbs. The more he absorbs, the more
when the time comes, he'll vomit out what's been absorbed.
In general, boys tend to speak much later than girls anyways, so
:xedfingers: let's hope all the tests comes out negative, ya. :wink:
I :pray: for ds2 as well, ok.

In the meantime, you can introduce to him more sight words ala
Shichida. It will be better to work with for him. When he starts to
speak/form sounds more clearly then go into Phonics, dun rush him
into it, as the current sounds are not yet clear to you or him as yet.
Hence, Phonics may slow his reading skills and speech..

Keep it up, yo!
:celebrate:

buds
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Postby Rio » Sun Mar 01, 2009 9:48 am

Hi all,

I also have the same problem as winth. My 2nd child, 20 mth old boy still not talking, maybe only 5 words vocab. Has been calling daddy, jiejie (to my older girl), byebye, gif (give) and lai (come). Never call mama :cry:

My PD has been suggesting in doing a second hearing test, getting a speech therapist etc if he still doesnt talk when he hit 24 mths. But should I, cos PD said cost will be in the thousands......

He can imitate sound, esp when he is playing with his 5yo sister . He will make sound like mamamamama, yayayayaya, hehehehehe etc. He will also try to follow the phonic sound of the letters when he plays with Leapfrog Discovery Ball, such as letter A, B, D, F, H, K, P, S, T and Y. But he just refuse to say the word of ABC etc.

However, he has good attention span. He love flashcard, and can almost sit thru the whole shichida lesson. He knows all the letters when he is 17 mths, ie if u ask him N, he will turn the Discovery ball and point to the N. He also knows 1 to 10, and I think he can count to 5. How i did that, eg I will give him 5 sweets, and I tell him I want 3 sweets. He will use his fingers and bring out the sweets, while I say out the number. When i say 3, he will stop, so I think he can count ba? But he cant go more than 5.

But there is one thing I notice about my boy that got me quite worried. He doesnt like illustrations, pictures. For example, when I give him a story book, and tell him about the pictures, he will not look at the pictures, but the small numbers at the corner of the pages (those indictae pages). or he will pick out small tiny numbers found within the pictures. Or he will just look at the big capital letter that normally found on the beginning of each page. He likes to flip newsapaper, and would specifically look for identical numbers and capital letters, such as two of the same F, or D or 3 or 5. Those would make him very excited. He can make me flash the shichida dots card at least 10 times a day (not the dots, but the numbers). He love to look at car number plate, and would stop at each car, point n make noise. That's why I never let him walk in a car park, or I will take half an hour to reach my home. But when I show him pictures, he runs away. The only time he looks at pictures is when i do flashcard at fast speed. .

Would really appreciate some advise, cos I am not sure if he is developing normally. His learning process is just so different from my girl. that i worried that he is autism or something like that......................

Rio
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Postby jedamum » Sun Mar 01, 2009 10:35 am

Rio wrote:My 2nd child, 20 mth old boy still not talking, maybe only 5 words vocab. Has been calling daddy, jiejie (to my older girl), byebye, gif (give) and lai (come). Never call mama :cry:


It's perfectly ok for 20mth old not to speak sentences.
My 27mth old is not speaking in sentences yet...if you consider speaking >4 words in a string is consider as sentences. My 23mth old nephew is also not speaking in sentences.
Rio wrote:My PD has been suggesting in doing a second hearing test, getting a speech therapist etc if he still doesnt talk when he hit 24 mths.

there are 4 more months to observe. toddlers can develop very fast in a few months.
Rio wrote:He can imitate sound, esp when he is playing with his 5yo sister . He will make sound like mamamamama, yayayayaya, hehehehehe etc. He will also try to follow the phonic sound of the letters when he plays with Leapfrog Discovery Ball, such as letter A, B, D, F, H, K, P, S, T and Y. But he just refuse to say the word of ABC etc.

My 27mth old can say the phonetic sounds since 18mth old, but he is still not speaking in sentences. He can say the ABCs, count the 123s, but still not speaking in sentences. He is good at mimicking any sounds and words but still not speaking in sentences.
Rio wrote:However, he has good attention span. He love flashcard, and can almost sit thru the whole shichida lesson. He knows all the letters when he is 17 mths, ie if u ask him N, he will turn the Discovery ball and point to the N. He also knows 1 to 10, and I think he can count to 5. How i did that, eg I will give him 5 sweets, and I tell him I want 3 sweets. He will use his fingers and bring out the sweets, while I say out the number. When i say 3, he will stop, so I think he can count ba? But he cant go more than 5.

My boy's PreN(3yo) syllabus is only introducing 1-5 and in Nursery(4yo) will introduce 6-10. That's probably the usual non-kiasu rate they expect kids to learn their numbers. Your kid is only 20mth old.
Some lesser priviledged children can only count when they go to school at K1/P1.

Rio wrote:Would really appreciate some advise, cos I am not sure if he is developing normally. His learning process is just so different from my girl. that i worried that he is autism or something like that......................

Whether or not he is developing normally, we can't really tell. You have to guage based on your mother's instinct. many a times, the progress seems good on paper, but there may be unlying conditions that only through interactions can you detect. many a times, the progress seems behind, but it may only be because the kid is not developmentally ready for that stage. Try not to mix up academic readiness with developmentally readiness. Try not to compare the siblings. Many a times, girls develop faster than boys.
From what was described by you, I feel that your 20mth old is academically more advanced than most regular peers. As for zooming into details instead of the big picture, is flashing cards at a fast speed hindering him from slowing down to appreciate the big picture? :wink:

Trust your instinct. jmho.

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Postby buds » Sun Mar 01, 2009 7:14 pm

Rio wrote:Hi all,

I also have the same problem as winth. My 2nd child, 20 mth old boy still not talking, maybe only 5 words vocab. Has been calling daddy, jiejie (to my older girl), byebye, gif (give) and lai (come). Never call mama :cry:

My PD has been suggesting in doing a second hearing test, getting a speech therapist etc if he still doesnt talk when he hit 24 mths. But should I, cos PD said cost will be in the thousands......

He can imitate sound, esp when he is playing with his 5yo sister . He will make sound like mamamamama, yayayayaya, hehehehehe etc. He will also try to follow the phonic sound of the letters when he plays with Leapfrog Discovery Ball, such as letter A, B, D, F, H, K, P, S, T and Y. But he just refuse to say the word of ABC etc.

However, he has good attention span. He love flashcard, and can almost sit thru the whole shichida lesson. He knows all the letters when he is 17 mths, ie if u ask him N, he will turn the Discovery ball and point to the N. He also knows 1 to 10, and I think he can count to 5. How i did that, eg I will give him 5 sweets, and I tell him I want 3 sweets. He will use his fingers and bring out the sweets, while I say out the number. When i say 3, he will stop, so I think he can count ba? But he cant go more than 5.

But there is one thing I notice about my boy that got me quite worried. He doesnt like illustrations, pictures. For example, when I give him a story book, and tell him about the pictures, he will not look at the pictures, but the small numbers at the corner of the pages (those indictae pages). or he will pick out small tiny numbers found within the pictures. Or he will just look at the big capital letter that normally found on the beginning of each page. He likes to flip newsapaper, and would specifically look for identical numbers and capital letters, such as two of the same F, or D or 3 or 5. Those would make him very excited. He can make me flash the shichida dots card at least 10 times a day (not the dots, but the numbers). He love to look at car number plate, and would stop at each car, point n make noise. That's why I never let him walk in a car park, or I will take half an hour to reach my home. But when I show him pictures, he runs away. The only time he looks at pictures is when i do flashcard at fast speed. .

Would really appreciate some advise, cos I am not sure if he is developing normally. His learning process is just so different from my girl. that i worried that he is autism or something like that......................


Heyya Rio,

Sounds like a budding Mathematician you may have there in the making!
:wink: Dear Rio, your child is still in the early developmental stages and
for a 20mth, he's doing a lot already. His participation and excitement,
towards that many stimulations on top of good concentration span is reali
considered advanced compared to peers his age. I congratulate you on
your detailed observations as a parent, it is indeed commendable. Half
the time, we have parents who can't tell how their kids are doing in sch
or what the kids reali like and dislike - mostly due to time constraints
(cos work is a killer) or perhaps the child is mostly cared for by a
grandparent, nanny or by a maid.

When he calls everyone, ie. jiejie and daddy... is it clear... the sounds,
are they muffled or just unclear like baby-slang? He's in the stage where
he is still observing, listening and exploring his surroundings. The more
stimuli he gets, the faster his language will develop. Do not worry unduly
this early... my 2nd one started talking in clear strings of sentences only
mebbe a few months after her 3rd birthday... and now its hard to get her
to STOOOPPP! :lol: :lol: :lol: The only time she is quiet is when she SLEEPS!

As for speech therapy, during my teaching years, there were parents who
went for similar consultations but they claim its done too clinically till even
what their children cud actually already do, couldn be done during the
sessions (which are not cheap)! Guess the children were frightened off
being in a room with the therapist testing and knowingly observing their
every word and action... A few in the end, do not speak at all during
sessions so the parents gave up. I managed to help a few - stammering,
slow talkers, weak pronunciation, etc. When they get older, they will
develop better skills to adapt to speaking properly.

I do sense your worry over the repetitive fascination over the SAME
activities thingy. But there are also other aspects of autism that you
shud know abt too. Here are a few, and i do hope it helps ease your
worry.... or fear.

MAJOR CHARACTERISTICS

Autism is three times more likely to affect males than females.
This gender difference is not unique to autism, since many
developmental disabilities have a greater male to female ratio.


Many autistic infants are different from birth.

Two common characteristics they may exhibit include arching their
back away from their caregiver to avoid physical contact and failing
to anticipate being picked up (i.e., becoming limp). As infants, they
are described as either passive or overly agitated babies. A passive
baby refers to one who is quiet most of the time making little, if any,
demands on his/her parents. An overly agitated baby refers to an infant
who cries a great deal, sometimes non-stop, during his/her waking hours.
During infancy, many begin to rock and/or bang their head against the
crib; but this is not always the case.

In the first few years of life, some autistic toddlers reach developmental
milestones, such as talking, crawling, and walking, much earlier than the
average child; whereas others are considerably delayed. Approximately
one-half of autistic children develop normally until somewhere between 1
1/2 to 3 years of age; then autistic symptoms begin to emerge.


During childhood, autistic children may fall behind peers of the same
age, mebbe in the areas of communication, social skills, and cognition.
In addition, dysfunctional behaviors may start to appear, such as self-
stimulatory behaviors (ie. repetitive, non-goal directed behavior, such
as rocking, hand-flapping), self-injury (e.g., hand-biting, headbanging),
sleeping and eating problems, *poor eye contact, insensitivity to
pain, hyperactivity, and attention deficits.

*From what i gather from your observations, your child does have good
eye-contact from all the stimulation via Shichida (flash cards).

One characteristic which is quite common in autism is the
individual's ‘insistence on sameness’ or 'perseverative' behavior.
Many children become overly insistent on routines; if one is changed,
even slightly, the child may become upset and tantrum. Some common
examples are: drinking and/or eating the same food items at every meal,
wearing certain clothing or insisting that others wear the same clothes,
and going to school using the same route. One possible reason for
"insistence on sameness" may be the person's inability to understand
and cope with novel situations.

I have had personal experience with an extremely autistic child who
will throw at me any material which is plain coloured - eg. all white,
all wooden coloured toys (which are aplenty in a Montessori environment)
and he likes everything circles, things that move in circular motion or
at time just him, going round and round in circles or just spinning around
on the spot.

The times i have insisted him on doing something, i get serious reactions
and lotsa clean up to do. Another circular thing he does is - putting his
finger in the toilet. Flush it and get very excited when the water goes
flushing round and round... oh yes, he does like to do it over and over
again. But the one thing he likes to do are puzzles - and he was great
at it! Better than me, i think!

Autistic individuals sometimes have difficulty with the transition to
puberty. Approximately 25% have seizures for the first time during
puberty which may be due to hormonal changes. In addition, many
behavior problems can become more frequent and more severe during
this period. However, others experience puberty with relative ease...

With early detection and early intervention, autism can be dealt with in
a positive environment and lots of help/attention in the home. The aim
is to help these children if not academically... be independent with daily
routines like self-care (shower, eating, toileting, etc) and also assist with
expression so less tantrums will erupt when the child is not able to get
his message across or not get what he/she atually wants.

There will be speech delays in some, esp if the autism is undetected for
many good years where it can be on a mild side.

All that being said, give your child some time ok.
Suppose he may not be ready yet... for speech ( in your case )

Hopefully, your worries are uncalled for, ya... :xedfingers:
Continue observing and being there for him. Let him feel
your love, no matter how different his learning journeys
may be.

:celebrate:
Hang in there, Rio.
Have a good week ahead, ya!

buds
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 22683
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 3:21 am
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