Cross-eyed

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Cross-eyed

Postby winth » Wed Mar 17, 2010 3:28 pm

Hi there,

My DS2 is cross-eyed, mild case type, his left eye is slightly crossed inwards and right eye's normal.

The doc said that there are methods to adjust this situation, but he said that in some cases, their eyes 'self-adjust' as they grow older. I'm trying to gather sources and more information about such methods cos he's going 3 and his cross-eye seemed to be getting more obvious.

Anyone has information to share?

winth
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Postby schweppes » Wed Mar 17, 2010 6:09 pm

Hi Winth

DD2 used to suffer from lazy eye (when she was about 3yo) and had to go for eye patching. She is 10yo now and her eyes have "normalised".

I've given feedback in this discussion. You might want to have a read,
http://www.kiasuparents.com/kiasu/forum ... &start=170

:celebrate:

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Postby winth » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:39 am

Hi schweppes,

Thanks for the link!
And yes, the doc termed it 'lazy eye' too when we tried to ask more.
He kept telling us to wait for a while for DS2 to self-correct before we seek any kind of treatment.

I tried to read more after your first post, but there wasn't a further discussion on this 'lazy eye' or eye patch treatment.

May I know how does the doc do it?
Is DD2 supposed to just walk around with the patch during treatment or the doc needs to do some eye exercises with her?
Does DD2 need to go there for frequent treatment or it can be done at home?

winth
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Postby tree nymph » Thu Mar 18, 2010 12:28 pm

Hi winth,

How old is your boy?

My boss's son, went for a corrective ops when he was six to correct his cross eye. He has slight cross eye when he was about three, but his eyes didn't self-correct when he got older and the KK children eye's clinic pd needs to operated on it to correct it.

My friend's son, who has got the lazy eye - that is one side of the eye is 50 degrees shortsided, the other eye is dunno how much (quite a lot of difference) was on eye patch - for 3 mths now.

So I think they are different eye conditions - cross eyes = cock eye (in layman's term) whereas lazy eye is when one eye much more powerful then the other eye.

tree nymph
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Postby winth » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:00 pm

Hi tree nymph,

He's going 3 soon.
And bec of this age, it's difficult to determine if he's lazy eye or cross eyed since he won't be able to know.

But this GP that we had said it's a lazy eye condition.

winth
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Postby tree nymph » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:24 pm

winth wrote:Hi tree nymph,

He's going 3 soon.
And bec of this age, it's difficult to determine if he's lazy eye or cross eyed since he won't be able to know.

But this GP that we had said it's a lazy eye condition.


winth,
I suggest you bring your boy to polyclinic, get a referral to KK hospital and let the pd eye specialist follow up with his condition. They will fix up appointment prob at 3 mths interval to review his case and monitor if his condition is getting better or worst and they will be able to prescribe treatment. Sometimes GP cannot diagnose the exact problem.

tree nymph
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Postby LKVM » Thu Mar 18, 2010 2:27 pm

tree nymph wrote:winth,
I suggest you bring your boy to polyclinic, get a referral to KK hospital and let the pd eye specialist follow up with his condition. They will fix up appointment prob at 3 mths interval to review his case and monitor if his condition is getting better or worst and they will be able to prescribe treatment. Sometimes GP cannot diagnose the exact problem.


Good suggestions but I would prefer NUH cause sometime back even when we had doubt we went to polyclinic and the doctor said NUH have better eyes docs and hence he refered us there very smooth and we were satisfied :wink:

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Postby schweppes » Thu Mar 18, 2010 10:43 pm

[Editor's note: Topic selected & edited for Portal publication.]

winth wrote:May I know how does the doc do it?
Is DD2 supposed to just walk around with the patch during treatment or the doc needs to do some eye exercises with her?
Does DD2 need to go there for frequent treatment or it can be done at home?


Hi Winth

This is what we did with DD2's lazy eye... Hope it gives you a better idea of what to expect.

Getting a referral
It is best to go to a specialist to have your son's eyes checked.

As suggested by tree nymph and LKVM, you could go to the polyclinic to get a referral to KKH Children's Eye Clinic or NUH. In my case, we brought DD2 to KKH. However, as the waiting time was too long - over 6 months - DH and myself decided to skip the polyclinic route and brought DD2 as a walk-in patient to KKH instead. Although the fees were much more expensive, since there were no subsidies, we decided to go ahead with it as we felt our daughter's eyes were more important, and we did not want to delay treatment.

In any case, we were very happy with the services at KKH Children's Eye Clinic. The specialist that we saw was Dr Sonal.

Treatment
After the specialist saw DD2, she recommended that she had to go for eye patching. Her good eye is the left eye and the right eye is the lazy eye.

What is eye patching?
To correct the lazy eye, we had to patch the good eye (left eye). In other words, cover the good eye with an eye patch (which we bought at the pharmacy). This forces the lazy eye to "work" harder and focus better.

DD2 had to wear the eye patch for 3 hours every day. This is on your own time, meaning you can patch her eye at home. No need to go to the doctor's office or hospital for patching. DD2 wore it when she went to school and even to church.

Some of the kiddie eye patches come with stickers on them, so it entices the kids to wear them. We were fortunate that DD2 was very compliant and was agreeable to wear the eye patch without much fuss. In any case, she felt that she looked like Cyborg (one of the Teen Titans characters) and thought that she looked "cool" and "cute". So that really helps!!

How long must the kid wear the eye patch?
This really depends on the doctor's recommendation and advise. DD2 wore her eye patch 3 hours daily for about 2-3 years. I know, it's a long time. But at the end of the day, it's for her own good. The specialist that we saw is very strict about the kids wearing the eye patches. I have seen her reprimanding parents if they are not diligent in following her advise. Her view is that if we as parents don't help the child, then how can the child get better.

So, on our part, DH and myself will diligently patch her eye on a daily basis. We even did that when we went overseas on holidays. As mentioned, DD2 is a very obedient girl, so that really helps a lot.

Any medication or eye exercises?
My DD2 did not need to take any medication and there were no eye exercises needed. But the doctor advised us to regulate her TV viewing time and computer games- don't watch/play too much and don't sit too near.

Any special diet or supplements?
In terms of diet or supplement, I did not give her anything special. The only thing I remember giving her the most was the wolfberry. I included that in her soup and porridge.


Doctor's appointment
In the early stages - when we first saw the KKH specialist - I think we went to see the doctor every two months. Then, it became every 6 months. This went on for about 2-3 years. When DD2 was about 7 yo, then it became an annual check-up thereafter. I guess, how often the child sees the doctor is really on a case-by-case basis.

Whilst it was "troublesome" in the early stages - as my DH and myself took turns to take leave to bring her - we felt it was worth the trouble. Most importantly, DD2's lazy eye was corrected.

I know the doctor that you went to mentioned that some kids' lazy eye self-corrects. Personally, I'd go with the mother's instinct. If you feel uneasy, then bring him to an eye specialist. If there is no cause for concern, then that's really good news. But if something needs to be done, at least one can quickly go for early intervention.

Hope the above helps. Not to worry, lazy eye is nothing serious. But do get the proper diagnosis. :lol:

:celebrate:
Last edited by schweppes on Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Postby schweppes » Thu Mar 18, 2010 11:05 pm

I wish to add and remind parents NOT to self-medicate. In other words, if you think your child suffers from lazy eye and you want to buy the eye patches from Guardian or Watson to patch your child's eye without consulting the doctor first, DON'T!!

The eye patching is a treatment and the eye specialist needs to recommend how long the patching should be done each time as it is case-by-case and each child is different.

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Postby autumnbronze » Fri Mar 19, 2010 12:04 am

Schweppes,

:thankyou: for such an informative and clearly explained post.


*gasp! sense of deja vu, then :idea:* ....

I know I've said this to you before in one of your posts :wink: :wink:

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