Cooking Oil - what do you use?

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What cooking oil do you use at home

1) olive oil
10
24%
2) canola oil
11
26%
3) Corn oil
1
2%
4) soybean oil
2
5%
5) peanut oil
5
12%
6) palm oil
3
7%
7) safflower oil
1
2%
8) coconut oil
2
5%
9) sunflower oil
7
17%
 
Total votes: 42

onlyoliveoil
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by onlyoliveoil » Sun May 31, 2015 5:31 pm

slmkhoo wrote:
starlight1968sg wrote:Can we conclude extra virgin olive oil is the best followed by canola oil for cooking?
EVOO is more strong-tasting, so may not work with some recipes. It's also more expensive, so if it's going to have the taste covered by other sauces etc, it seems to be a waste. I believe is also have a lower burning point and may not be suitable for some cooking methods.
Extra virgin olive oil is a very heart-healthy oil. It is a major component of the Mediterranean Diet. There are many other health benefits. http://onlyoliveoil.vas.com.sg/health/

The fruit intensity of extra virgin oil can be classified into three categories: (1) Robust (intense fruity taste), (2) Medium, and (3) Mild & Delicate.

The first two categories are meant to be used uncooked, i.e. applied or as a finishing touch on dishes like salad, bread, grilled fish and vegetables, pastas, stew, soup - that is, we use the olive oil as a raw material (healthy ingredient) and it is not undergone heating, where its anti-inflammatory property and antioxidants are at its best.

The mild and delicate extra virgin olive oil has a "light" taste.

Unlike pure or extra light olive oil, mild and delicate olive oil is an "extra virgin" olive oil, where it has the polyphenols and oleocanthals that are the anti-inflammatory and antioxidants we need each day.

Pure or extra light olive oil is a "refined" oil, which means it has undergone extremely fine filtration process to reduce the acidity and sensory defects of poor quality virgin olive oil. It has little phytonutrients (anti-inflammatory and antioxidants), and it is flavourless and odourless.

8 tips to choosing and buying premium quality extra virgin olive oil http://onlyoliveoil.vas.com.sg/2015/05/ ... olive-oil/

Extra virgin olive oil withstand heat well. Its smoke point is between 190ºC-215ºC. http://onlyoliveoil.vas.com.sg/use/ while our normal and ideal cooking temperature is around 180ºC. So extra virgin olive oil is good for daily cooking/frying.

When we are using extra virgin olive oil for cooking/frying, we should consider the pairing of the food we are preparing and the olive oil we use.

For everyday cooking/frying, we should consider mild and delicate extra virgin olive oil to ensure that the taste of olive does not overpower the meal we prepare and we could reap in the most benefits of its anti-inflammatory and antioxidants through consuming it on a daily basis. The best approach is to find a good pairing so that the olive taste is a complement rather than overwhelming.

Using pure or extra light olive oil is fine for frying because it is flavourless and odourless, and the smoke point is higher. However we need to note that the ratio of refined olive oil and (extra) virgin olive oil in both normally is about 90:10. We could still enjoy the monounsaturated fatty acid it offers but not the other phytonutrients.

For health benefits point of view and value-for-money, mild and delicate extra virgin olive oil is a good choice because when we compare the price of both the pure/extra light olive oil and extra virgin olive oil, it does not differ too much, and anyway extra virgin olive oil can withstand the home cooking temperature.

More importantly, we can enjoy the nutrients in extra virgin olive oil, polyphenols, oleocanthal and monounsaturated fatty acid, besides the olive taste.

starlight1968sg
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by starlight1968sg » Sun May 31, 2015 5:47 pm

onlyoliveoil
Thanks so much for sharing.
I note on the benefits of EVOO.
Thank you.

onlyoliveoil
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by onlyoliveoil » Sun May 31, 2015 6:16 pm

starlight1968sg wrote:Can we conclude extra virgin olive oil is the best followed by canola oil for cooking?
Ever since I learn of the health benefits of extra virgin olive oil, I have been taking two tablespoonful of extra virgin olive oil every morning before I have my breakfast. Two tablespoonful is almost one day need of anti-inflammatory and antioxidants. However, we must use premium quality extra virgin olive oil because it has the most of polyphenols and oleocanthals - look out for those extra virgin olive oil that give you the peppery (that make you cough when the olive oil is at the back of your throat) and bitter taste.

Many may not like to "drink" the "olive juice" directly - premium quality extra virgin olive oil will not give you that greasiness feeling, then we could simply pour some onto the rustic bread and we can enjoy its health benefits. Alternatively, we can use it to fry our vegetables. Use it moderately on a daily basis and for a long term, we could feel its benefits.

Most of the canola oil is made from genetic modified rapeseeds. So it depends on how you feel of a genetic modified food, or you may want to steer away.

Like most seed oil, Canola oil is a refined oil that has undergone chemical refining and high heat during the oil extraction process. During this process, some of the oil may be damaged but we can't tell because the oil is also deodorised to remove the smell.

Canola oil has about 28% of polyunsaturated fat, where the ratio of Omega-6 and Omega-3 is a 2:1, which is considered a balanced ratio.

Canola oil is also high in monounsaturated fats, which are healthy. These are the fats found in large amounts in olive oil.

The issue lies in the amount of polyunsaturated fats, in particular the Omega-6 which is pro-inflammatory, where we do not need a lot.

Using canola oil to cook/fry on a daily basis would raise our intake of polyunsaturated fats to an unacceptable level, because we are also taking in meat (omega-6) at the same time.

Also keep in mind that during the oil extraction process, much of these “heart healthy” fats have already gone rancid or bad.

If we could afford to use extra virgin olive oil in our daily culinary preparation, that will be great news for our kids and family. Good for their healthier and heartier future.

If not, look out for the organic or expeller-pressed oils in our supermarket -
I notice lately that there is a non genetic modified version (sunflower and canola) sold in our supermarket - look out for the "non GMO" verified.

I briefly mentioned about these expeller-pressed oils in http://onlyoliveoil.vas.com.sg/2015/05/ ... olive-oil/

chickamums
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by chickamums » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:10 am

I also use rice bran oil for stir fries and also olive oil for western dishes.

Janet32
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by Janet32 » Fri Jan 11, 2019 10:45 am

I use extra-virgin olive oil, it is high in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and a quality bottle can truly take you on a taste bud adventure. There's one catch with extra-virgin versus other grades of olive oil: It has a relatively low smoke point (325 to 375 degrees F), which means you may not want to use it for frying or roasting at temperatures above that smoke point.


Diana83
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by Diana83 » Mon Jan 28, 2019 12:41 pm

depends what Im cooking i wouldnt use olive oil for pancakes, to saute onions garlic vegetables i use olive oil not extra virgin though to robust, for bread dipping yeah extra virgin with balsamic.

Alex75
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by Alex75 » Thu Jan 31, 2019 11:32 am

The Science of Cooking Oils: Which Are Really the Healthiest?

https://www.livescience.com/59893-which ... hiest.html

alison75
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by alison75 » Sun Feb 03, 2019 8:32 pm

I think coconut oil is the best, but I use olive oil for now. Cocounut oil can get expensive, even the cheap brands.

jho48109
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by jho48109 » Fri Feb 08, 2019 12:18 pm

If you use Olive oil regularly, you are consuming monounsaturated fats that will help you lower your risk of heart disease and breast cancer, and that's possibly because of its high monounsaturated fat content, which lowers cholesterol. I find olive oil brilliant for any Mediterranean dish, brilliant with pastas and risottos.

alessandra66
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Re: Cooking Oil - what do you use?

Post by alessandra66 » Tue Feb 19, 2019 11:27 am

olive oil or coconut oil.

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