Would anyone eat Rojak again?

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Would anyone eat Rojak again?

Postby super_dad » Wed Apr 08, 2009 10:37 am

hehe...I think everyone should know what I am talking about. Come to think of it, Rojak is a "dangerous" dish as it is usually not heated before serving. :roll:

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Postby csc » Wed Apr 08, 2009 10:45 am

I would definitely abstain from rojak for some time now - and go for food that is cooked on the spot . (maybe chi-zha or sliced fish soup )

And I'll choose the eating place very carefully - definitely not at some run-down coffee shops/food centres with fat rats running around , :!: , no matter how delicious the food is.

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Re: Would anyone eat Rojak again?

Postby ChiefKiasu » Wed Apr 08, 2009 10:47 am

super_dad wrote:hehe...I think everyone should know what I am talking about. Come to think of it, Rojak is a "dangerous" dish as it is usually not heated before serving. :roll:


I may be wrong as I only glanced at the report, but I thought it was Indian rojak? That's quite cooked before being served, isn't it?

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Postby csc » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:00 am

It is Indian Rojak - the newspaper article went into details of how the pieces are refried again and again and how water is being added to the curry to save time and effort from making fresh ones --

Gosh - to think I used to ask for second helping of the curry !!! :stupid:

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Postby sashimi » Wed Apr 08, 2009 11:50 am

csc wrote:It is Indian Rojak - the newspaper article went into details of how the pieces are refried again and again and how water is being added to the curry to save time and effort from making fresh ones --
\

But the fact is.... isn't this common practice? What's ironic is that the issue of hawkers and hygiene is not new. Other than the fact that this incident seems to involve a particularly virulent bacteria(?), it's the media making a big fuss out of it.

If we are truly paranoid, we won't be eating Prima Deli cakes either - I didn't even know about this earlier incident until the papers reported it again in the light of the rojak case.

I am no medical scientist, but I think we have to be careful in any case.

Having said all that I feel very very sorry for Mdm Aminah's tragic death and her family. This is really sad.

But I will continue eating my favouriate Indian Rojak. Because ultimately, it's not a case of the cuisine at fault, but the cook. If the cook is at fault, and the same faults are practised by another cook selling chicken rice, you're just as likely to fall sick eating chicken rice.


EDIT: aiyoh, this is bad. There is a second fatality.

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Postby EstherTan » Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:10 pm

Remember there's also the miscarriage being 'linked' with the rojak...

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Postby EN » Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:26 pm

Hmmm...I don't quite like Indian rojak. Everytime I tried to pop them in my mouth, I kept wondering how long has the food been kept & re-heat. There's once dh ordered, he insisted I try & when I did, I told him the gravy is off & he better not eat it.

For us, the stall must look clean, surrounding no smells & I will also look at the person serving/selling them.

Like CSC, I usually will go for those that cook on the spot.

Since this happen, no Indian Rojak for us for a verrrry long time.

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Postby schellen » Wed Apr 08, 2009 12:32 pm

EstherTan wrote:Remember there's also the miscarriage being 'linked' with the rojak...


Like what sashimi said, I don't think the miscarriage was due to the indian rojak cos the foetus was already weak. Probably, the mother was also not strong. We already know that miscarriages in first trimester are actually very common. It's nature's way of telling you that your baby was too weak to survive to full term. (I think this is partly why many women I know don't want to "broadcast" that they're pregnant until after the first trimester. Me too.)

About indian rojak, I ate it so many times, even when I was pregnant with DD so I think I'll go by gut instinct and my other senses when buying and before eating.

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Postby sashimi » Wed Apr 08, 2009 1:31 pm

Ah..... I edited out my point about the miscarraige cos it's very subjective and controversial. But since the subject came up again.....

The first day the news broke out, the headline was underlined (subheadline) by the statement that the food poisoning has resulted in 1 coma and 1 miscarraige.

When I read the actual ST article, it said that
1) the mother had went for checkup before eating the rojak, and was depressed cos the doctor said the foetus was weak. The rojak was meant to cheer her up.
2) a doctor was quoted as saying that food poisoning rarely causes miscarriage.

So - my long misgivings about media sensationalism aside - I was quite unimpressed by ST's casual linking of the food poisoning with the miscarriage. The media is still linking it by the way.

My personal conclusion is that the food poisoning probably contributed to the miscarriage, but I am very hesitant to agree that it CAUSED the miscarriage. That implies it was a healthy foetus which was lost due solely to the food poisoning.

Having said that, I grant that this food poisoning case is very very serious. I'm just against the media sensationalising any part of it.

But again, this is just me. I'm not a medical scientist and I dont' 'want to overanalyze. Still feeling very sorry for the families who have sufferred because of this.

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Postby sashimi » Wed Apr 08, 2009 1:35 pm

EN wrote:Hmmm...I don't quite like Indian rojak. Everytime I tried to pop them in my mouth, I kept wondering how long has the food been kept & re-heat. There's once dh ordered, he insisted I try & when I did, I told him the gravy is off & he better not eat it.

For us, the stall must look clean, surrounding no smells & I will also look at the person serving/selling them.

Like CSC, I usually will go for those that cook on the spot.

Since this happen, no Indian Rojak for us for a verrrry long time.


Actually, yes, most Indian Rojak is not well-prepared, cos it's all sitting around waiting to be refried.

There is one particular style of Indian rojak though, that seems fresher overall. But I don't know how to describe the difference. The pieces are usually not as bright and oily. I know one at Waterloo Centre.



Mmmmm... actually ah, since this incident, won't it be the case that all Indian Rojak sellers would put in extra effort in their hygiene practices? It would be the other, non-Indian Rojak sellers who would continue to be complacent about hygiene.....

At this point I should not say anything about the stall i despise most, the economical rice stall at S11 at Bt Batok Central, bunch of smokers who sneeze into their food.

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