From PSLE to University

Is there life after O/A-Levels? Definitely! How well a person does in tertiary education is correlated with job opportunities open to the person. Discuss issues pertaining to nstitutes of higher learning here.

Do you think our Singapore Education System is the only system available to your child?

Poll ended at Tue Dec 28, 2010 11:01 am

Yes
14
25%
No
41
75%
 
Total votes : 55

From PSLE to University

Postby 2ppaamm » Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:01 am

//Editor's note: Topic selected & edited for Portal publication.

Quite a few people asked me. So thought I'd share here how I get my children prepared for university in 2 to 3 years after their PSLE. I'm just a mum who does not want my children to go through the sad Singapore system (PSLE is enough). If this helps you, I am glad. :)

What I did was to select a Diploma course for my children when they finished their PSLE. Singapore's Maths does give a good foundation to the children, so I make sure they learn that properly. In addition, my children do not go for tuition or anything throughout their Primary school years, but they read very widely. I don't train them but I read to them alot, 4 of them started reading very early (at 4), my last child read later as I had very little time to read to him.

I am strongly against tuition because I believe that it kills the love of learning for most kids. Besides, tired kids cannot think and cannot excel. Done my research, all geniuses, from Einstein to Mozart, to Leonardo da vinci do not get 'monitored' 24/7. They are allowed to roam freely and learn at will. Most of them have only a notebook to keep their observations and learn from themselves. I believe in that.

Do your own bit of research.... how many kids who excel at PSLE top their "A" levels or in their uni? Safely, less than 1%. Don't burn them out at such a young age.


With the love for reading and a good foundation for Maths, they are able to cope with very rigorous reading required at High School Diploma level.

After the PSLE, I give them these books to study (by now, they are very excited to start - as they see it a key to escape the choking system they are in). The course is modular, so they earn the credits as they finish each module. As they finish a module, I give them the next, I don't really monitor and let them finish at their own pace. They then take the exams. I choose an online program so that I know when they have finished the module and pass them the next topic. Again, I don't tutor. The self-learning skills they acquired through their primary school years without tuition and their passion I believe in instilling comes into work here.

My daughter, who 'eats books', finished the course in 1 year. My son took 2 years. Really depends on the propensity of the child.

After the recognized HSD, they can then sit for the SAT, all universities take that for admissions, including Singapore universities.

Key is, don't push the child, let him/her develop the love for learning. That way, they actually go through the process faster... And, for my 2 children who finished, they actually thanked me for it, and did not detest it at all.

If you plan to hot house your child, forget it. He/She will probably be better off in the local system where everyone is hot housed anyway. Poor kids have a lot to handle already so don't force them onto anything. To us, university is a way to pursue what you love earlier (I honestly don't understand all the "basic" that we teach till "A" levels and then throw them all out later, basic should just be basic, then we allow our children pursue their dreams) - just my philosophy.

Hope this helps you :siam: from this system and still give your child a head start.
Last edited by 2ppaamm on Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby kiasimom » Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:15 am

I am certainly most impressed!
Did you apply to MOE to opt your children out of secondary education?

What is the criteria?

kiasimom
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1526
Joined: Wed Oct 28, 2009 3:01 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby 2ppaamm » Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:20 am

kiasimom wrote:I am certainly most impressed!
Did you apply to MOE to opt your children out of secondary education?

What is the criteria?


Nope, I did not have to opt out of the sec education. My children stayed in their schools and guay guay followed the school syllables. They did their HS studies only during holidays, or when they felt like it (remember, it is modular), when they were accepted by the universities, I simply enrol them in the university and then quit school. The RI headmaster was very nice, he promised to take my son back if uni does not work out. Again, he is a friend, but he has already stepped down! No more back up for my son in case he does not like uni!

My son actually likes uni a lot more than secondary school. He finds the autonomy and challenges in thinking fun. Just that his classmates are all so old.... His thinking also become soooo old. We keep him sane and connected through his sports and church.

One more thing, primary school education is compulsory, not secondary.
Last edited by 2ppaamm on Fri Jan 08, 2010 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby jedamum » Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:25 am

opting out of sec sch to go direct to uni? is that a bit too fast?
getting the uni cert is not all about getting the cert. what about the taste of campus life?
my husband got his degree at age 19; if given a chance, he said he'll choose to go with the norm cos he can enjoy the campus life.

jedamum
Councillor
Councillor
 
Posts: 8515
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:58 pm
Total Likes: 20


Postby lizawa » Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:32 am

Hi 2ppaamm,

Interesting and thanks for starting this topic.

Can you share how / where you research for suitable Diploma programmes for your kids ?

I suspect this route may only be suitable for those highly independent and perhaps somewhat more intelligent children. Were your kids from the GEP stream ? And care to share what were their PSLE scores ?

Since this is more or less "self study", does it mean that you have to exclude all modules that require practical exams ? or maybe you have access to labs ?

Thanks !

lizawa
BrownBelt
BrownBelt
 
Posts: 665
Joined: Tue Apr 22, 2008 11:29 am
Total Likes: 0



Postby 2ppaamm » Mon Dec 28, 2009 11:53 am

lizawa wrote:Hi 2ppaamm,

Interesting and thanks for starting this topic.

Can you share how / where you research for suitable Diploma programmes for your kids ?

I suspect this route may only be suitable for those highly independent and perhaps somewhat more intelligent children. Were your kids from the GEP stream ? And care to share what were their PSLE scores ?

Since this is more or less "self study", does it mean that you have to exclude all modules that require practical exams ? or maybe you have access to labs ?

Thanks !


Coming from a family of 5 children, all my kids have no option but to be very independent,. Mummy has no time! My kids are ordinary, but they are good readers and they are very passionate about what they want to do. I believe in instilling that. Read some books about getting your kids fired up. Our Singapore kids are too "driven from outside", they just follow instructions. They need to have fire in the bellies.

Only 1 of my children is in GEP. That's partly because I chose not to put the older kids through the GEP tests. I needed the 4th kid to get out of the school because I didn't quite like the new principal and how he handled my kid, so I got him to take the GEP test. Amazingly, he got through (so don't need Dr Peh lah). His IQ is in the range of 160+, but he is also tested autistic.

My children scored between 230 to 260 for PSLE. So not so high lah. Again, all self study, so you cannot really compare with tuitioned kids. I believe most top scorers get some help from tutors? Also, note that my kids are all state representatives in their respective sports. So no time to study also.

Factor all these things in, you will realise that my kids are ordinary, not book worm, no time to hot house them type. (Also make too much noise and quarrel a fair bit though they don't fight.) But I like to think that they are above average in their IQ.

To get a HSD, you will need to do both Science and Humanities. Also, if you choose to do 'A' levels (which I did not, maybe for 4th kid I will), you will need to think about how to access the labs. Not so difficult, lah, just look up yellow pages and get the equipments shipped to your house! I did that recently when helping one of my kids invent a new material to file a patent. My kids did Physics, Chemistry and Bio as well. The course I chose required 23 modules. These are 3.

I cannot recommend any course - not right lah, but there are many out there, I prefer the US-based because distant learning is well recognized. But there are others, including A levels. I remember this family having coached their own kids to A levels. If they can, so can you!

Help this helps! Ordinary kids can do extraordinary things!
Last edited by 2ppaamm on Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:21 pm, edited 5 times in total.

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby 2ppaamm » Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:00 pm

jedamum wrote:opting out of sec sch to go direct to uni? is that a bit too fast?
getting the uni cert is not all about getting the cert. what about the taste of campus life?
my husband got his degree at age 19; if given a chance, he said he'll choose to go with the norm cos he can enjoy the campus life.


Is campus life = university life or JC life? If it is the latter, definitely he will miss it. You will definitely need to do a lot of research into this and check, double check and triple check if you child is willing to go uni early. It is not for everyone. My hubby was totally against it. It was my son who went on strike - refused to talk, until we allowed him to do his course.

If it is the uni campus life. Sharing from my son's case: he will have 4 years of campus life as an undergraduate, he then goes to NS together with his peers at 18, then he goes to uni again to do his PhD while his friends also go uni. He just does a different degree and course at that time. He graduates with them after 4 years, but his degree is different, he probably has more options for career. He will have 8 years of campus life at least! I have asked him to skip all summer courses because we are not really in a rush. During summer, he takes up guitar courses, language courses and will spend 3 months sports training in another country coming summer. I am also persuading him to do exchange programs in his junior and senior years.

I guess it is just pursuing education via a different path. At least that is to me. Not trying to save time or anything in our case.

2ppaamm
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 2538
Joined: Wed Dec 23, 2009 11:57 pm
Total Likes: 6


Postby Blobbi » Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:28 pm

I'm rushing out of the house - no time to write much except to say, like most of the mums here, I :faint: after reading what your kids have achieved.

You're too modest! So great to hear about success stories to know we're all not trapped by the system, IF we're brave enough to do what you and your kids have done. It's a personal choice, so stories like yours really help to inspire.

I read you loud and clear. But first, got to lay the groundwork, ie, instill a sense of responsibility. And must *listen* to my kid.

Blobbi
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1479
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 5:35 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby tacit » Mon Dec 28, 2009 12:55 pm

Thank you for sharing, 2ppaamm. :D

Question: How did you select the Diploma course? I mean, like what do you look at, how do you know that it's reliable, etc.

tacit
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2009 1:14 am
Total Likes: 0


Postby jedamum » Mon Dec 28, 2009 1:01 pm

2ppaamm wrote:Is campus life = university life or JC life? If it is the latter, definitely he will miss it. You will definitely need to do a lot of research into this and check, double check and triple check if you child is willing to go uni early. It is not for everyone. My hubby was totally against it. It was my son who went on strike - refused to talk, until we allowed him to do his course.
.

:D
so long your kid has a 'say' in such decision making, you'll be saved from future 'naggings' :wink:

jedamum
Councillor
Councillor
 
Posts: 8515
Joined: Thu Jan 10, 2008 3:58 pm
Total Likes: 20


Next

Return to Tertiary Education - A-Levels, Diplomas, Degrees