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Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:07 pm
by slmkhoo
zac's mum wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 12:49 pm
I agree with you. In our generation, local grads tend to be very “by-the-book”, their whole Uni life was basically spent studying and not much else (talking about the Science stream where it’s more cutthroat to get the good grades). Early morning or Saturdays must report for early lessons & lab practicals take up so much time. Of course Arts and other stream can party…)

I went overseas for my Science undergrad, first thing we learnt is nerds are frowned upon. U need to talk well, talk about non-studies related things, generally be a nicer, all-rounded person with hobbies + know how to cook, spend weekends NOT studying but watch & play sports…u want to get the coveted honours projects, learn to be liked the lecturers (who get bored by u talking serious academic stuff…)
But let's not encourage our kids to swing to the other extreme of valuing nice packaging over substance! A good balance should be the aim, I think. I studied in the UK, and have a decent degree in a course that prizes talking a lot, but personally find it extremely trying to talk to a person who is more focused on his 'show' than his 'substance'.

I don't want to generalise, but I would question the depth of a professor who can't wax lyrical about his own subject, and express his thoughts in words that can be understood by those who are not of his specialty - and, of course, he should be able to talk about other things too. Similarly with other people - who says a Humanities student can't be interested in sciences? Even if he can't go into detail, a lot of the discussion can be about the philosophy and value of the topic, not the specifics.

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:07 pm
by SG_KP1
For the local universities, is placement strictly on A Level (or IB) score or do they also consider other attributes and work done over the last couple-few years of education? My sense was stuff like Medicine will also consider other factors due to a limited places and volume of applicants, but does this apply to stuff like Computer Science, Business, etc?

I also thought some UK universities will make offer but it will be conditional on certain A Level or IB results? In contrast, I think many American universities will make decision before A Level results are out or will only be part of the equation.

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:14 pm
by slmkhoo
SG_KP1 wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:07 pm
For the local universities, is placement strictly on A Level (or IB) score or do they also consider other attributes and work done over the last couple-few years of education? My sense was stuff like Medicine will also consider other factors due to a limited places and volume of applicants, but does this apply to stuff like Computer Science, Business, etc?

I also thought some UK universities will make offer but it will be conditional on certain A Level or IB results? In contrast, I think many American universities will make decision before A Level results are out or will only be part of the equation.
This is what I remember from my daughters' uni applications (one applied to local/UK/US)!
Local - only some courses have interviews, tests etc. Some admit purely based on exam results. Not exactly sure which do what.

US - they don't admit based on IB or A level results. They probably only look at them as an indication of students' strengths, but the scores that matter are the SAT/ACT. Even so, they also look at a lot of other stuff (personal statement, extracurriculars, teacher recommendations etc) in order to decide who to offer places to.

UK - they ask for non-academic stuff as well (personal statement, extracurriculars, teacher recommendations etc), and some will have tests and interviews. Because most UK (and Sg) students make uni applications before they take their A levels, applicants are given conditional offers in terms of exam results. If they meet their offer, they will get a place.

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:35 pm
by SG_KP1
slmkhoo wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:14 pm
This is what I remember from my daughters' uni applications (one applied to local/UK/US)!
Local - only some courses have interviews, tests etc. Some admit purely based on exam results. Not exactly sure which do what.

US - they don't admit based on IB or A level results. They probably only look at them as an indication of students' strengths, but the scores that matter are the SAT/ACT. Even so, they also look at a lot of other stuff (personal statement, extracurriculars, teacher recommendations etc) in order to decide who to offer places to.

UK - they ask for non-academic stuff as well (personal statement, extracurriculars, teacher recommendations etc), and some will have tests and interviews. Because most UK (and Sg) students make uni applications before they take their A levels, applicants are given conditional offers in terms of exam results. If they meet their offer, they will get a place.
Thank you. For US, the SAT/ACT is in a bit of limbo right now. MIT brought the scores back for Fall 2023 while Harvard still has a temporary moratorium. The UC System (UCLA, Berkley, etc) has eliminated them post-COVID as has the University of Chicago (although here the requirement was eliminated pre-COVID).

My guess is more schools will make them optional over the coming years, although maybe not as many in the MIT league, etc. That being said, if you can score well on them it will likely still be advantageous to submit the scores...

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:35 pm
by doodbug
It is getting more difficult to generalize what each course does and how each course admits even within local universities because the rules and practices are gradually changing over the years. As MOE says, universities will set aside more and more places for aptitude-based admissions, i.e. admissions that are not solely based on A level or IB score. So in the past, it may be x% of places going to entry by score, now we know, that percentage will decrease.

All I can say is that all courses will set aside more places for discretionary admissions in that those who so not meet the academic cut off for shortlisting, more will have the opportunity to be considered based on other factors.

For courses with no further testing requirements, (such as Computing, or Science), it is true that you are admitted once you meet the academic criteria based solely on grades. There are other courses for which academic criteria gets you shortlisted for furhter tests or selection mechanisms. There arae also courses like NUS Law who will shortlist anyone who is in the top 5% of any JC or MI. Every course has their own admission policies. Its a more varied landscape now

https://sg.style.yahoo.com/nus-law-wide ... 52157.html

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 4:50 pm
by SG_KP1
doodbug wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:35 pm
It is getting more difficult to generalize what each course does and how each course admits even within local universities because the rules and practices are gradually changing over the years. As MOE says, universities will set aside more and more places for aptitude-based admissions, i.e. admissions that are not solely based on A level or IB score. So in the past, it may be x% of places going to entry by score, now we know, that percentage will decrease.

All I can say is that all courses will set aside more places for discretionary admissions in that those who so not meet the academic cut off for shortlisting, more will have the opportunity to be considered based on other factors.

For courses with no further testing requirements, (such as Computing, or Science), it is true that you are admitted once you meet the academic criteria based solely on grades. There are other courses for which academic criteria gets you shortlisted for furhter tests or selection mechanisms. There arae also courses like NUS Law who will shortlist anyone who is in the top 5% of any JC or MI. Every course has their own admission policies. Its a more varied landscape now

https://sg.style.yahoo.com/nus-law-wide ... 52157.html
I found the IGPs interesting. For example, say I take Computing in Upper Sec and again in JC, and have developed some interest and skill. But if I screw up one or two of the other A Level subjects (presumably Math and computing will be OK) I may be out (vs. AAA/A grade profile for most of the offers). Not complaining - the system is what it is...

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 4:56 pm
by doodbug
SG_KP1 wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 4:50 pm
I found the IGPs interesting. For example, say I take Computing in Upper Sec and again in JC, and have developed some interest and skill. But if I screw up one or two of the other A Level subjects (presumably Math and computing will be OK) I may be out (vs. AAA/A grade profile for most of the offers). Not complaining - the system is what it is...
Don't worry, you will be considered under Discretionary Admissions. Computing kids who have a long and keen interest in Computing have lots to show in their portfolios - from creating apps to part time work gigs. You are out only in regular admissions, but as shared earlier, MOE has announced that a greater proportion of places in universities will go to Discretionary Admissions.

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 6:36 pm
by Terrydad
While NUS Computing is very difficult to get into, there are a lot more computing places available in NTU, SMU and SUTD.

Bear in mind also that it is hard to maintain a high CAP in NUS Computing. There are kids who score perfect RP who get in, but who find they have to grind day and night just to score an average CAP. Ironically enough, there are kids who get in on a discretionary basis, and game constantly, but who top the course readily.

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 6:39 pm
by doodbug
Terrydad wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 6:36 pm
While NUS Computing is very difficult to get into, there are a lot more computing places available in NTU, SMU and SUTD.

Bear in mind also that it is hard to maintain a high CAP in NUS Computing. There are kids who score perfect RP who get in, but who find they have to grind day and night just to score an average CAP. Ironically enough, there are kids who get in on a discretionary basis, and game constantly, but who top the course readily.
Totally agree that one need not be fixated on NUS. My kids don't seem keen on NUS at the moment.

Re: All About Universities

Posted: Mon Apr 18, 2022 6:42 pm
by Terrydad
SG_KP1 wrote:
Mon Apr 18, 2022 3:35 pm
Thank you. For US, the SAT/ACT is in a bit of limbo right now. MIT brought the scores back for Fall 2023 while Harvard still has a temporary moratorium. The UC System (UCLA, Berkley, etc) has eliminated them post-COVID as has the University of Chicago (although here the requirement was eliminated pre-COVID).

My guess is more schools will make them optional over the coming years, although maybe not as many in the MIT league, etc. That being said, if you can score well on them it will likely still be advantageous to submit the scores...
Nevermind the Ivy League. Which good and less high profile US universities are lowest cost?