COP and mean score

Unlike entry to Primary Schools, admission into Secondary Schools is based on meritocracy. PSLE results are used as key admission criteria. Discuss everything related to PSLE and selection of Secondary Schools here.

Do you consider mean T-score?

I consider COP and mean T-score
6
67%
I consider COP only, mean T-score is not important
2
22%
I consider COP only, what is mean T-score?
1
11%
 
Total votes : 9

COP and mean score

Postby heutistmeintag » Sun Nov 29, 2009 1:54 am

I noticed that alot of parents (including me at some point in time) are discussing about COP and not looking at the mean T-score. Are you prepared to "push" your child through even though they could potentially end up in the lowest percentile and risk losing their esteem/confidence? Or am I missing some logic here?

heutistmeintag
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 383
Joined: Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:30 am
Total Likes: 0


Re: COP and mean score

Postby millan » Sun Nov 29, 2009 7:56 am

heutistmeintag wrote:I noticed that alot of parents (including me at some point in time) are discussing about COP and not looking at the mean T-score. Are you prepared to "push" your child through even though they could potentially end up in the lowest percentile and risk losing their esteem/confidence? Or am I missing some logic here?


Ya, I am also wondering... :D But it seems that there are alot of cases that they can appeal thru, and some with affiliated ones are coming with lower COP, so they try lor..

millan
GreenBelt
GreenBelt
 
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:48 am
Total Likes: 0


Postby ooptimizer » Sun Nov 29, 2009 8:45 am

Some parents may think differently - they may think that if the child mixes with higher ability students, it may push them to perform better.

My own opinion is to give a +/- 10 points to the T-score, ie. if the child scores say 200, his actual score is around 190 to 210.

I've seen some students with high T score slack off in secondary school, while other students with low T score start to shine and overtake other students from secondary school onwards.

ooptimizer
BlackBelt
BlackBelt
 
Posts: 841
Joined: Fri Nov 27, 2009 8:39 am
Total Likes: 0


Postby JonC » Sun Nov 29, 2009 9:28 am

Well, you know your own kids well.

To put them into a school where your kids score is at the bottom of that school, it depends if you know if your child has potential / room to further improve.

In general, boys tends to improve / catch up with the girls over the years as they mature. Girls will move a little and kind of stop, some worst, drops. So in the end, both sexes will level up at some point.

If you think you kid is at the max of his potential at P6 result, going to a school at the lower percentile, he will stuck at the lower percentile and affect his self esteem. So mean T should be seriously considered.

If you think your kid is far from his full potential, going to a good school at its COP will push him to his max potential.

Good students go to whatever school will remain good if they are not influenced by bad environment. Average or below average pupils tends to be affect by the environment easily.

Well, you can disagree with my 2 cents worth. But if you have been to good school, you will know the difference.

JonC
BlackBelt
BlackBelt
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 4:55 pm
Total Likes: 18


Postby tutormum » Mon Nov 30, 2009 12:38 pm

JonC wrote:Well, you know your own kids well.

To put them into a school where your kids score is at the bottom of that school, it depends if you know if your child has potential / room to further improve.

In general, boys tends to improve / catch up with the girls over the years as they mature. Girls will move a little and kind of stop, some worst, drops. So in the end, both sexes will level up at some point.

If you think you kid is at the max of his potential at P6 result, going to a school at the lower percentile, he will stuck at the lower percentile and affect his self esteem. So mean T should be seriously considered.

If you think your kid is far from his full potential, going to a good school at its COP will push him to his max potential.

Good students go to whatever school will remain good if they are not influenced by bad environment. Average or below average pupils tends to be affect by the environment easily.

Well, you can disagree with my 2 cents worth. But if you have been to good school, you will know the difference.

:goodpost:

tutormum
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 1201
Joined: Sun Oct 11, 2009 10:44 pm
Total Likes: 21



Postby heutistmeintag » Mon Nov 30, 2009 1:49 pm

JonC wrote:Well, you know your own kids well.

To put them into a school where your kids score is at the bottom of that school, it depends if you know if your child has potential / room to further improve.

In general, boys tends to improve / catch up with the girls over the years as they mature. Girls will move a little and kind of stop, some worst, drops. So in the end, both sexes will level up at some point.

If you think you kid is at the max of his potential at P6 result, going to a school at the lower percentile, he will stuck at the lower percentile and affect his self esteem. So mean T should be seriously considered.

If you think your kid is far from his full potential, going to a good school at its COP will push him to his max potential.

Good students go to whatever school will remain good if they are not influenced by bad environment. Average or below average pupils tends to be affect by the environment easily.

Well, you can disagree with my 2 cents worth. But if you have been to good school, you will know the difference.


Well, that was a very logical approach but I kinda suspect there are alot of emotional considerations too. :lol:

I fully agree with your last point. I was in the last class of VS in s1 and s2 but pulled up my socks and went to the top class in s3 and s4. For my DD, I believe she has yet to max out and would like to provide the stimulus to her by sending her to a good school. However, that's only my belief that she will cope and what I experienced years back in sec school may not be applicable now.

I have a niece in Crescent Girls and she told us have to work very very hard. My wife is concerned with the pressures my DD has to face and it doesnt help with some of the recent suicide reports. That's why I am looking at the mean T-score for an indication of the standards of the cohort.

So the story I am pitching to my DD is that given $248 to invest, she should try to maximize by investing as much as she could afford. However, she must also be aware of the risks (& pressures) associated with the investment. It could well turn out to be a painful process but no pain, no gain!

heutistmeintag
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 383
Joined: Wed Jun 25, 2008 4:30 am
Total Likes: 0


Postby JonC » Tue Dec 01, 2009 9:45 am

@tutormum
Thanks.

@heutistmeintag
no pain, no gain, good one. :lol:

Some girls themselves may get distracted as they grow.

Just tell them either,
1. They do not work hard (or do not suffer) now (shorter years), they will have high chance of "suffering" in the future (longer years).
2. They work hard (suffer) now (shorter years), they will have higher chance of "not suffering" in the future (longer years).

JonC
BlackBelt
BlackBelt
 
Posts: 956
Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 4:55 pm
Total Likes: 18


Postby westmom » Thu Dec 03, 2009 10:48 pm

JonC wrote:Just tell them either,
1. They do not work hard (or do not suffer) now (shorter years), they will have high chance of "suffering" in the future (longer years).
2. They work hard (suffer) now (shorter years), they will have higher chance of "not suffering" in the future (longer years).


Haha..this is exactly what I told my dd when I saw she was becoming lazy in her schoolwork/revision. I asked her to choose:
a) 20 yrs suffering life (studying hard) followed by 40 yrs good life
or
b) 20 yrs good life (not studying) followed by 40 yrs of suffering life

She thought for a while and wisely chose (a) and showed
more "motivation" afterwards!

westmom
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 424
Joined: Sat Feb 21, 2009 7:29 pm
Total Likes: 0



Return to Secondary Schools - Selection