Missonary school and its chinese focus

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Missonary school and its chinese focus

Postby MMM » Mon Feb 23, 2009 11:15 am

Hubby came from all brothers school till Sec 4. While I was in a chinese focus primary school followed by convent school during my secondary school days.

Though he passes his chinese well enough for JC and uni,etc... but it's apparent that his chinese foundation is not very good. Eg. he found my P2's chinese overwhelming and he is "struggling" to coach her. Maybe it's just him :?

We were just talking abt it over the weekends and we both observed the following during our era :
* Most of our friends in missionary school find chinese uncool as they came from pure english speaking family (eg. there are alot more eurasians)
* They do not like the language and actually hated the subject. This led them to struggle with it during exams.

Not sure if this is still the scenario today. But if it is, just found it quite worrying as if we find that our kids cannot cope with the language and send them to schools where most of the kids also have a problem with the language, are we pushing them further away from the chance to like the language. But there are always 2 sides to a coin.

MMM
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Re: Missonary school and its chinese focus

Postby ChiefKiasu » Sat Feb 28, 2009 9:18 am

MMM wrote:...We were just talking abt it over the weekends and we both observed the following during our era :
* Most of our friends in missionary school find chinese uncool as they came from pure english speaking family (eg. there are alot more eurasians)
* They do not like the language and actually hated the subject. This led them to struggle with it during exams.
...


Hi MMM, speaking from personal experience, I think your observations are right on the money. When I was in St. Andrews', even though Chinese was a definite requirement and we were all highly motivated to do well in exams, there was a definite general feeling that we would never have to use Chinese again when we get out to work or study in the University. China was never in our horizon in terms of career objectives. So the goal was really to "bear" with Chinese until JC, and then we are home free. In fact, I remember celebrating, after my A-Levels, the fact that I no longer have to study Chinese.

Of course, that was being short-sighted. With the rise of China, it is most likely that our children will be doing a lot more commerce with China during their time. Hopefully this will motivate them to really embrace the Chinese culture unlike ourselves.

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Postby MMM » Mon Mar 02, 2009 8:52 am

Hi Chief,

When I was younger, I never appreciate why the govt was pushing for Sporeans to be bilingual. Until the 1st time I step into China in 2007. For once, it felt great that being Sporeans, we are bilingual. Not only are we able to speak the language, we are also able to read and write chinese characters. Reading road signs,etc... is a breeze though they have hypy.

I also never fail to amaze my China colleagues when I speak to them in my Spore chinese and they are able to relate better to me too since we speak the same language. The same applies to my US colleagues when they learnt that Sporeans learnt english and mandarin since young.

That was probably the point where I appreciate the govt's yong xin liang ku to ensure all Sporeans are bilingual. This was Spore's competitive advantage but of course it's not here to stay with more Chinese picking up english now.

It's definitely important for the children today to be good in the language and embrace it as after all, we originate from China. Being a sporean, it just makes it so unique.

Personally, I do hope the observation on missionary school is not so prevalent nowadays and kids are encourage to like the language.

MMM
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Re: Missonary school and its chinese focus

Postby phankao » Mon Mar 02, 2009 9:44 am

MMM wrote:Hubby came from all brothers school till Sec 4. While I was in a chinese focus primary school followed by convent school during my secondary school days.

Though he passes his chinese well enough for JC and uni,etc... but it's apparent that his chinese foundation is not very good. Eg. he found my P2's chinese overwhelming and he is "struggling" to coach her. Maybe it's just him :?

We were just talking abt it over the weekends and we both observed the following during our era :
* Most of our friends in missionary school find chinese uncool as they came from pure english speaking family (eg. there are alot more eurasians)
* They do not like the language and actually hated the subject. This led them to struggle with it during exams.

Not sure if this is still the scenario today. But if it is, just found it quite worrying as if we find that our kids cannot cope with the language and send them to schools where most of the kids also have a problem with the language, are we pushing them further away from the chance to like the language. But there are always 2 sides to a coin.


Then a Chinese Mission School. !

phankao
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Postby chilipadi » Mon Mar 16, 2009 1:37 pm

Hi,

I also agree with MMM observation. Now I am in a dilema as to what school to send to my daughter. however, mine situation is quite different as I do have a choice to send my daughter to a mission school that offers both english and chinese as 1st language. only problem is that it's co-ed. i much prefer to send her to an all gal school seeing that she is already so tom-boy... decisions decisions... sigh...

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Postby phankao » Mon Mar 16, 2009 9:58 pm

chilipadi wrote:Hi,

I also agree with MMM observation. Now I am in a dilema as to what school to send to my daughter. however, mine situation is quite different as I do have a choice to send my daughter to a mission school that offers both english and chinese as 1st language. only problem is that it's co-ed. i much prefer to send her to an all gal school seeing that she is already so tom-boy... decisions decisions... sigh...


Then send to a SAP mission school - all girls' or all-boys' have, wat.

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