How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

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How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

Postby My Tuition Haven » Sat Jul 20, 2013 4:02 pm

Why do we need to use idioms in creative writing?

Most students do not understand the reason why they need to use idioms in their compositions. Most just memorize a few and then use them repeatedly in their writing. Or they are confused by the literal meaning of an idiom. For example 'hit the ceiling'.

I explain to them that using idioms in their compositions add a dimension to the story and allows the reader (their teacher) to look past the words that they are reading to the concepts that they are suggesting. In other words, the reader can create an image of certain parts of the story in his or her mind.

I also remind them not to overdo it with the idioms! A few selected ones in certain parts of a story will allow the reader to remember and appreciate the story. Too many, and the reader loses interest.

Time is needed to explain the meaning of certain idioms and practice is essential in using them regularly in compositions.

This week I reviewed Idioms with my P4 & P5 groups. Using the Jazz Up Your Writing book we wrote a paragraph on two titles using Idioms. The students were given just 10 minutes for each title.

In Trapped in a Lift, the idioms to describe nervousness and fear were reviewed. Here is an example of what one my students wrote:

In a blink of an eye, the lights in the lift flickered and went out. This was no laughing matter. I was all alone, trapped in a lift with no way out. I felt like a cat on hot bricks. Out of the blue, I realized that the emergency button was right in front of me. I kept pressing it urgently while trying to keep a cool head. Nothing seemed to happen until I heard a muffled voice shout, "Is anyone in the lift?" I felt hope.

For a list of idioms with explanation go to this website. It has quite an extensive list.
http://www.idiomsite.com/

My Tuition Haven
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How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

Postby My Tuition Haven » Sat Jul 20, 2013 4:05 pm

Why do we need to use idioms in creative writing?

Most students do not understand the reason why they need to use idioms in their compositions. Most just memorize a few and then use them repeatedly in their writing. Or they are confused by the literal meaning of an idiom. For example 'hit the ceiling'.

I explain to them that using idioms in their compositions add a dimension to the story and allows the reader (their teacher) to look past the words that they are reading to the concepts that they are suggesting. In other words, the reader can create an image of certain parts of the story in his or her mind.

I also remind them not to overdo it with the idioms! A few selected ones in certain parts of a story will allow the reader to remember and appreciate the story. Too many, and the reader loses interest.

Time is needed to explain the meaning of certain idioms and practice is essential in using them regularly in compositions.

This week I reviewed Idioms with my P5 group. Using the Jazz Up Your Writing book we wrote a paragraph on two titles using Idioms. The students were given just 10 minutes for each title.

In Trapped in a Lift, the idioms to describe nervousness and fear were reviewed. Here is an example of what one my students wrote:

In a blink of an eye, the lights in the lift flickered and went out. This was no laughing matter. I was all alone, trapped in a lift with no way out. I felt like a cat on hot bricks. Out of the blue, I realized that the emergency button was right in front of me. I kept pressing it urgently while trying to keep a cool head. Nothing seemed to happen until I heard a muffled voice shout, "Is anyone in the lift?" I felt hope.

For a list of idioms with explanation go to this website. It has quite an extensive list.
http://www.idiomsite.com/

My Tuition Haven
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Re: How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

Postby jwxh » Mon Jul 22, 2013 9:12 am

hi,
can i know where is your tution place? yr contact number plse?

jwxh
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Re: How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

Postby jwxh » Fri Jul 26, 2013 9:01 am

hi, would appreciate if you could help and explain. Tks

Daniel, my brother, is more intelligent than _________.
(1) me (2) her (3) mine (4) I

Anyone who _________ the newspaper will know about the robbery yesterday.
(1) read (2) has read (3) reading (4) had been reading

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Re: How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

Postby HAPPYH » Fri Jul 26, 2013 9:08 am

My Tuition Haven wrote:Why do we need to use idioms in creative writing?

Most students do not understand the reason why they need to use idioms in their compositions. Most just memorize a few and then use them repeatedly in their writing. Or they are confused by the literal meaning of an idiom. For example 'hit the ceiling'.

I explain to them that using idioms in their compositions add a dimension to the story and allows the reader (their teacher) to look past the words that they are reading to the concepts that they are suggesting. In other words, the reader can create an image of certain parts of the story in his or her mind.

I also remind them not to overdo it with the idioms! A few selected ones in certain parts of a story will allow the reader to remember and appreciate the story. Too many, and the reader loses interest.

Time is needed to explain the meaning of certain idioms and practice is essential in using them regularly in compositions.

This week I reviewed Idioms with my P4 & P5 groups. Using the Jazz Up Your Writing book we wrote a paragraph on two titles using Idioms. The students were given just 10 minutes for each title.

In Trapped in a Lift, the idioms to describe nervousness and fear were reviewed. Here is an example of what one my students wrote:

In a blink of an eye, the lights in the lift flickered and went out. This was no laughing matter. I was all alone, trapped in a lift with no way out. I felt like a cat on hot bricks. Out of the blue, I realized that the emergency button was right in front of me. I kept pressing it urgently while trying to keep a cool head. Nothing seemed to happen until I heard a muffled voice shout, "Is anyone in the lift?" I felt hope.

For a list of idioms with explanation go to this website. It has quite an extensive list.
http://www.idiomsite.com/


Thank you for sharing. Quite useful

HAPPYH
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Tips on writing Compositions

Postby My Tuition Haven » Tue Sep 03, 2013 11:42 am

As the year is drawing to a close and P5 is looming in the near future, I have begun to prepare my P4 students for the new components that they will be introduced to. Every year I advise parents to start early because the leap from P4 to P5 can be daunting.

One of the components that I work on diligently is writing. Students need to move away from the 3 Picture scenarios, outlined for them clearly and begin to construct their own stories with exciting and logical plots. This can be a leap, considering that they now only construct the ending.

If parents are unsure of where to begin, I have begun a series on writing Compositions on my blog www.thinking-factory.com with phrases and model compositions done by my students to give them an idea.

One way to start forming good writing habits, is to start writing good opening and closing paragraphs. Most P4 students go straight into the first picture "One day, John was walking to school and it was raining heavily."

A good opening paragraph can describe a setting or set a scene. Using weather as an opening can be a good start before exploring other ways to begin a composition. "Black ominous clouds covered the sky as rain pelted down on John.."

A good closing paragraph wraps up a story well. E.g. "John had learnt a valuable lesson. He promised himself that...."

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Re: How to help your child use Idioms in compositions

Postby Blue Pearl » Thu Jan 08, 2015 4:01 pm

Thank you My Tuition Haven

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