Spotting talent early

Academic support for Primary 5
Post Reply
EN
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 1108
Joined: Mon Jul 07,

Post by EN » Thu Dec 18, 2008 9:50 pm

Kiasulang wrote
It is sad to say we do have parents who try to mould their children simply to take advantage of GEP or DSA.


Yes, it is very sad. May be parents are ignorant of how stringent, pressuring, time consuming to push a child towards a certain heights in a competition.

If you dont' mind, we might want to gather feedback on the pros & cons of developing a children to take advantage of DSA. To make it simple, just copy, paste & add on what you feel in embarking our children to take advantage of DSA.

SPORTS - swimming, athletic, football, netball, basket ball etc
Pros
- for DSA application (if win)
- healthy body equate to healty mind
- feel good factor due to recognition
- able to nurture talent



Cons
- time consuming
- missed classes (friendly match, competition, rehearsal, practice)
- costly (coach, trainer, equipment, gear, pocket money)
- stress
- bad time management
- ability to handle disappointment
- need to change school if you spot your child talent & the primary school did not have eca to cater for the talent.
- talented but school has limited resources to support talent (especially true for group competition)
- fatigue



ACADEMICS - Math, Science Olympiads (please add on for any others)
Pros
- for DSA application (if win)
- feel good factor due to recognition
- able to nurture talent
-


Cons
- disappointment
- unsuitable selection used by school in recognizing talent
- stress
- need to change school if you spot your child talent & the primary school did not have eca to cater for the talent.
- talented but school has limited resources to support talent (especially true for group competition)
- cost (does academic competition involves cost?)

SX4
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Dec 18,
Total Likes:1

Post by SX4 » Thu Dec 18, 2008 10:46 pm

Hi, I'm not a parent, just a sports coach who chanced upon this website. I will like to share what I know and experienced about DSA admission through sports.

I represented my schools from primary through to university level. If someone were to ask me what is the most memorable about my teenage life, I will definitely say its the CCAs that I participated in. What sports has brought to me has been invaluable, and that is the underlying reason for my passion to teach sports.

I quite agree that some parents do go too far in pushing their kids when they are still very young. Some parents I know even start their kids off as early as p1 so as to get a headstart in DSA 6 years later! But I have also seen parents, who despite knowing their child has an aptitude for a certain sport, do not want their children to get too involved, or always think they won't be good enough. At the end of the day, parents all want to do their best for their kids.

I will like to elaborate on some of the good points brought up earlier.

Pros
- for DSA application (if win)
IMHO, if the child has good ball sense or athletic ability, it is worth a go to try see how far he can go. For example, racket games usually look for good coordination, agility and ball sense. I have seen kids who pick up a sport less than 1 year and still DSA successfully.

- time management
Sports can make the kids more disciplined, and improve their time management. If they want to go for their training, they will need to finish their homework first.

- ability to handle disappointment
Sports can make kids more mentally resilient, as they learn how to accept defeats graciously, and that hard work is required to succeed.

I hope my lengthy post has not bored anyone :P
If anyone needs more information on the DSA process, or whether their kids are eligible for DSA, do pm me and I'll be happy to help if i can :)

metz
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 1625
Joined: Mon Jul 28,
Total Likes:4

Post by metz » Thu Dec 18, 2008 11:41 pm

SX4 wrote:
Pros
- for DSA application (if win)
IMHO, if the child has good ball sense or athletic ability, it is worth a go to try see how far he can go. For example, racket games usually look for good coordination, agility and ball sense. I have seen kids who pick up a sport less than 1 year and still DSA successfully.

- time management
Sports can make the kids more disciplined, and improve their time management. If they want to go for their training, they will need to finish their homework first.

- ability to handle disappointment
Sports can make kids more mentally resilient, as they learn how to accept defeats graciously, and that hard work is required to succeed.

I hope my lengthy post has not bored anyone
If anyone needs more information on the DSA process, or whether their kids are eligible for DSA, do pm me and I'll be happy to help if i can


Hi SX4,

Thanks for your sharing. The points that you shared above are exactly my husband's sentiment. He was very active and involved in a number of competitive sports during his primary school days. But he chose badminton as his niche when he progressed to secondary sch & JC.

At the moment, he prefers to let the kids to run around, 'play' a variety of outdoor games/activities and develop natural instincts in sports rather than train them in a particular activity. He believes that will help them develop better agility, ball sense etc, and enable them to pick up sports with relative ease. :)

metz
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 1625
Joined: Mon Jul 28,
Total Likes:4

Post by metz » Fri Dec 19, 2008 9:28 am

kiasulang wrote:Hi EN and Chamonix

My son has won quite a few medals since he started competitive swimming. He works hard to earn them. I did not plan for this. His talents was discovered by his coach after a few surviving swimming lessons. I agreed to put him on competitive swimming because I thought it would be the same. Believe me, it is much tougher.

Throughout these years, I have seen many swimmers come and go. Even those who persist, many have not won medals before. The swimming arena are mostly dominated by a few(I believe all sports are). After all, there can only be one champion per event. These children need to have passion and exercise self-discipline.

I believe gifted(talented) cannot be trained, they can only be born. Only if we, as parents, spot their talents early be it sports or academics, and nurture them, they can develop these potentials fully. I did not push my son when he took up competitive swimming. We let nature takes its course. It is his passion and the friendships he developed with other swimmers that keeps him going.

It is sad to say we do have parents who try to mould their children simply to take advantage of GEP or DSA. These children suffer most.


Hi kiasulang,

I'm sure your son is both talented and disciplined. You have every reason to be proud of him. :)

I agreed to put him on competitive swimming because I thought it would be the same. Believe me, it is much tougher.


It's definitely tougher. My 3.5yo has just started water confidence lessons 2 months ago. Her swimming instructor found her natural in swimming. (According to him, she can coordinate the head and strokes movement naturally in water) Though she's only at Level 1, he's targeting for her to complete Level 3. At the end of the 1 hr group session, the swimming instructor would spend another 10-30 mins with her. Although it looks tough to me, my girl seems to enjoy it. So I can imagine how much tougher competitive training will be. Anyway, we have no plans for her to go further than learning to swim well.

Bottomline, if the kids enjoy what they are doing, then it would be good to send them for proper training.

kiasulang
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 80
Joined: Sat Nov 29,

Post by kiasulang » Fri Dec 19, 2008 11:24 pm

One Con outweighs all the pros, I believe is peers pressure. Majority of the cohorts know who you are.

If you are not academically inclined, you might find yourselves struggling trying to balance schoolwork and training.

Through DSA or not, our kids count on our discretion.


EN
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 1108
Joined: Mon Jul 07,

Post by EN » Sat Dec 20, 2008 11:41 am

Hi SX4, thanks for replying & sharing some thoughts :)

I'll add time managment to the pros then but I will maintain it in the cons. Reason will be the ripple effects.

A child is active in LDDS but talent spotted in school during physical fitness test/PE. The child is likely to be pulled to athletics to represent schools. The school which earns a 3rd placing in inter-school competition in team sports finds that they lack of someone to play center position which requires stamina & speed. Easiest find will be those in athletic club who happens to be okay with balls too. Then school decides, what a role model the child is, why not elect the child as a prefect too. The child might or might not be able to juggle all the above.

Abilty to handle disappointment, I will add in to the pros but will maintain in the cons. It depends on the child character. But :mrgreen: I happen to fall into the pros rather than the cons.

Hi Kiasulang

Thanks, good points. I'm sure you are proud of your son's achievement. Would you be able to give me some pointers on how to be there for our kids in terms of supportive role without being a pushy parents? I was active in competitions throughout my school days. But I never let my parents know my activities. All they saw were trophies & for me there's no pressure of parent's expectation and they were not there when I fell hard.

Would you be able to share more information on the NUSH maths? How's the training is like etc?

Does your child experience ripple effects & what's your take?

Okay, I will re-post the list of pros & cons in the next posting.

Ahhh..the time pressure of being a mummy. :wink:

kiasulang
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 80
Joined: Sat Nov 29,

Post by kiasulang » Sun Dec 21, 2008 1:59 pm

Hi EN

I'm afraid I do not have information on NUS High math.

However, If you child is in GEP, there is a Primary Mathematics Masterclass aim to challenge pupils who have demonstrated exceptional ability in Mathematics by exposing them to topics beyond the GEP Primary Mathematics curriculum. Students can also join AMEC in their school. This club trains the students to take part in math competitions.

Please follow below link
http://www.moe.gov.sg/education/program ... sterclass/

There is a method I use:
When your child has finished his math paper, don't mark on it. Let him know the number of wrong answers(mistakes) he has made and ask him to check his paper until he gets it right. Each time he has checked, ask him to write a journal about how he has spotted the mistakes.

EN
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 1108
Joined: Mon Jul 07,

Post by EN » Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:23 pm

Hi Kiasulang

Thanks for sharing the method that you use. I will try to use the method & hope to see reduce errors due to careless (over confident) mistakes.

Ughhh... by the way, the effect that I mentioned earlier is not ripple effect but domino effect.

Another thing that I want to add, for DSA sports, I think the child will need to win at least in inter-school competition. For a normal eca, the eca practice is once a week, but when school competition draws nearer, the number of practice per week increases. I'm not sure if this is the current practice but that was what happen in the past. For children that are exceptional, they will be invited for Singapore School (in the past) & they have at least twice a week practice. Frequency will increased if there are competition coming. All in all, it will be an every practice.

Is that the reason why your son is swimming everyday? What happen if competition is drawing near? Will the number of practices or hours increased too?

Jenn
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 89
Joined: Tue Nov 25,

Post by Jenn » Sun Dec 21, 2008 3:32 pm

EN,

I have read a brief comment from a NUS High student on what they study in their school.

Taken from another forum:
http://talkback.stomp.com.sg/forums/sho ... 503&page=3

kiasulang
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 80
Joined: Sat Nov 29,

Post by kiasulang » Sun Dec 21, 2008 4:00 pm

EN wrote:Hi Kiasulang

Is that the reason why your son is swimming everyday? What happen if competition is drawing near? Will the number of practices or hours increased too?


My son trains everyday irregardless of competition dates or school exam dates. He finds that swimming helps him to freshen his mind and we enjoy watching him swim. Looking at him grow taller and better shape, we are relieved and glad that he is taking up the sport. He used to be thin, small size and fell sick every month.

Post Reply