MS Office skills.Let your child be proficient from Young.

Find out how to teach our children, or find and evaluate providers if we cannot do the teaching ourselves.
Forum rules The Academic Learning & Enrichment Forums are intended for parents to discuss how to teach their own children, and to find out more about education providers. Education providers can help parents with their queries, do they are NOT allowed to promote their services in these Forums. Advertisements should be done in the Buy & Sell -> Tuition Forum.

Which Module in Microsoft Office 2010 to learn first?

Poll ended at Sun Nov 24, 2013 4:00 pm

Word
0
No votes
Excel
0
No votes
Power Point
0
No votes
One Note
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 0

MS Office skills.Let your child be proficient from Young.

Postby jaimekong » Sun Sep 15, 2013 3:57 pm

Hi all parents/ educators,
I like to gather your views in having or providing your child to learn and be proficient and a chance to get certified in Microsoft Office Skills.

Do know that for pre-tertiary schools (i.e. Primary to Secondary), there is the ICT baseline assessment which expose students to Digital Literacy Skills at basic levels within their curriculum. I assumed that the Digital Literacy Skills that are widely used in schools (I refer to the mass) includes desktop productivity skills to photo editing and web editing tools in their projects and coursework.

I would like to gather your views and that is, if schools are providing such learning opportunity, would you be willing to let your child learnt the full suite of each module and be certified as a Microsoft Office Specialist as well? Be it comes as a free training course sponsored by school (praise the lord(!) if your kid's school provide the platform) or co-paid by students, its definitely a less pricey deal to learn and be certified in public IT training centres.

I agreed and believe most parents/ educators will share my sentiments that there is indeed a strong positive relationship between student's proficiency in digital literacy skills for school work and their engagement in SDL and CoL. Basic skills are mainly what they gained due to budgeted resources. Many obstacles that educators faced which may includes - time-intensively in mastering these skills, insufficient allocation of resources (trainer, cost, lab, etc) and perceived lower importance against the core curriculum being that these skill sets are non-examinable.

Again and again, the emphasis in our education system stresses that our kids should be proficient in digital literacy skills is rising.Thus what struck an impression was that we are facing an issue here i.e. mismatch equilibrium of perceived importance by teachers and/or students against students’ ability in mastering the IT skills for higher productivity in school. With such an mismatch equilibrium, students who are highly equipped with ICT skill sets versus those that are not (or not given an opportunity), we thus cannot blame the students to define CoL learning as a divide-and-conquer strategy. You do what you are best, and we most probably see one child or two ended up doing nothing apart from gaining the group’s credits. I guess that child would be happily grinning without understanding what he/she is truly missing out.

To be able to manipulate tools to create a pictorial piece for your school's newsletters/ classroom board via Word, creating Power Point slides to bring your message to "live" or create an impactful presentation, to me, are essential skills as our children entering the next phases of education/ life.

Put it this way, what ever enrichment or learning skills that may be sponsored or partially funded (from school or centres), I do want to know that at the end of the day, they can add value to our children's continuous learning. Agree?

For god's sake, basic typing skills, using paint (app) and clicking around the school LMS system or "good" in facebook or whatapps is not mastering digital literacy skills or so to speak.

let your views be shared.

jaimekong
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 2:01 pm
Total Likes: 0


MS Office skills.Let your child be proficient from Young.

Postby jaimekong » Sun Sep 15, 2013 4:00 pm

Hi all parents/ educators,
I like to gather your views in having or providing your child to learn and be proficient and a chance to get certified in Microsoft Office Skills.

Do know that for pre-tertiary schools (i.e. Primary to Secondary), there is the ICT baseline assessment which expose students to Digital Literacy Skills at basic levels within their curriculum. I assumed that the Digital Literacy Skills that are widely used in schools (I refer to the mass) includes desktop productivity skills to photo editing and web editing tools in their projects and coursework.

I would like to gather your views and that is, if schools are providing such learning opportunity, would you be willing to let your child learnt the full suite of each module and be certified as a Microsoft Office Specialist as well? Be it comes as a free training course sponsored by school (praise the lord(!) if your kid's school provide the platform) or co-paid by students, its definitely a less pricey deal to learn and be certified in public IT training centres.

I agreed and believe most parents/ educators will share my sentiments that there is indeed a strong positive relationship between student's proficiency in digital literacy skills for school work and their engagement in SDL and CoL. Basic skills are mainly what they gained due to budgeted resources. Many obstacles that educators faced which may includes - time-intensively in mastering these skills, insufficient allocation of resources (trainer, cost, lab, etc) and perceived lower importance against the core curriculum being that these skill sets are non-examinable.

Again and again, the emphasis in our education system stresses that our kids should be proficient in digital literacy skills is rising.Thus what struck an impression was that we are facing an issue here i.e. mismatch equilibrium of perceived importance by teachers and/or students against students’ ability in mastering the IT skills for higher productivity in school. With such an mismatch equilibrium, students who are highly equipped with ICT skill sets versus those that are not (or not given an opportunity), we thus cannot blame the students to define CoL learning as a divide-and-conquer strategy. You do what you are best, and we most probably see one child or two ended up doing nothing apart from gaining the group’s credits. I guess that child would be happily grinning without understanding what he/she is truly missing out.

To be able to manipulate tools to create a pictorial piece for your school's newsletters/ classroom board via Word, creating Power Point slides to bring your message to "live" or create an impactful presentation, to me, are essential skills as our children entering the next phases of education/ life.

Put it this way, what ever enrichment or learning skills that may be sponsored or partially funded (from school or centres), I do want to know that at the end of the day, they can add value to our children's continuous learning. Agree?

For god's sake, basic typing skills, using paint (app) and clicking around the school LMS system or "good" in facebook or whatapps is not mastering digital literacy skills or so to speak.

let your views be shared.

jaimekong
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 2:01 pm
Total Likes: 0


MS Office skills.Let your child be proficient from Young.

Postby jaimekong » Mon Sep 16, 2013 6:51 pm

Hi all parents/ educators,
I like to gather your views in having or providing your child to learn and be proficient and a chance to get certified in [b]Microsoft Office Skills.[/b]

Do know that for pre-tertiary schools (i.e. Primary to Secondary), there is the ICT baseline assessment which expose students to Digital Literacy Skills at basic levels within their curriculum. I assumed that the Digital Literacy Skills that are widely used in schools (I refer to the mass) includes desktop productivity skills to photo editing and web editing tools in their projects and coursework.

I would like to gather your views and that is, if schools are providing such learning opportunity, would you be willing to let your child learnt the full suite of each module and be certified as a Microsoft Office Specialist as well? Be it comes as a free training course sponsored by school (praise the lord(!) if your kid's school provide the platform) or co-paid by students, its definitely a less pricey deal to learn and be certified in public IT training centres.

I agreed and believe most parents/ educators will share my sentiments that there is indeed a strong positive relationship between student's proficiency in digital literacy skills for school work and their engagement in SDL and CoL. Basic skills are mainly what they gained due to budgeted resources. Many obstacles that educators faced which may includes - time-intensively in mastering these skills, insufficient allocation of resources (trainer, cost, lab, etc) and perceived lower importance against the core curriculum being that these skill sets are non-examinable.

Again and again, the emphasis in our education system stresses that our kids should be proficient in digital literacy skills is rising.Thus what struck an impression was that we are facing an issue here i.e. mismatch equilibrium of perceived importance by teachers and/or students against students’ ability in mastering the IT skills for higher productivity in school. With such an mismatch equilibrium, students who are highly equipped with ICT skill sets versus those that are not (or not given an opportunity), we thus cannot blame the students to define CoL learning as a divide-and-conquer strategy. You do what you are best, and we most probably see one child or two ended up doing nothing apart from gaining the group’s credits. I guess that child would be happily grinning without understanding what he/she is truly missing out.

To be able to manipulate tools to create a pictorial piece for your school's newsletters/ classroom board via Word, creating Power Point slides to bring your message to "live" or create an impactful presentation, to me, are essential skills as our children entering the next phases of education/ life.

Put it this way, what ever enrichment or learning skills that may be sponsored or partially funded (from school or centres), I do want to know that at the end of the day, they can add value to our children's continuous learning. Agree?

For god's sake, basic typing skills, using paint (app) and clicking around the school LMS system or "good" in facebook or whatapps is not mastering digital literacy skills or so to speak.

let your views be shared.

jaimekong
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2010 2:01 pm
Total Likes: 0



Return to Academic Learning & Enrichment