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GEP screening test? Go or no Go

Poll ended at Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:26 pm

Must Go
7
35%
Can Try
11
55%
Don't Go
2
10%
 
Total votes : 20

Postby ChiefKiasu » Thu Feb 12, 2009 9:08 pm

jedamum wrote:Have this being posted before?

I particularly find this line amusing...
In Singapore, I suspect if you're looking for a job, most companies won't care if you were in the GEP, unless it's the civil service. And I have never heard any kid say, "My dream is to be in the civil service!"


That's a very good post. It echoes my feelings. But I thought it would have been more effective if the author's kid herself is not in the GEP class.

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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 13, 2009 8:40 am

ChiefKiasu wrote:That's a very good post. It echoes my feelings. But I thought it would have been more effective if the author's kid herself is not in the GEP class.


I know what you mean but if she does not have a kid in GEP, she runs the risk of being a sour grape. In any case, she does not have expectations of her second going into GEP, so she is 50% outside the fence and 50% inside...so there is still credibility.
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Postby ngbrdad » Fri Feb 13, 2009 9:48 am

ApronMama wrote:
ngbrdad wrote:My son made it thru the 2 screening tests to start GEP in P4 this year.
To be honest my son is not very hardworking or diligent in his schoolwork.
He tends to be careless in exam too.
He is good with math (perfect score in his SA2 last year) and quite good in English and science but a bit weak in his higher chinese.
He tens to lose marks in open ended type of qustions in exams.
He probably would not have made it if the GEP selection tests are not in MCQ.format.

My wife and i decided to let him try out the GEP since he was already in a GEP+SAP school so there was no need to change school.

GEP is totally different from P3.
There are lots of projects, surveys, writeups etc.
He has 3 projects due in March.

As there are no desigmated textbooks, it's quite hard to follow his progress in class.
The math worksheets are tough.
For English, it's mainly reading as many books as possible. They were given a list of over 60 supplentary books to read this year.
For Chinese it's the same like all his peers but the higher chinese may be tough for students who switched from schools previouly doing normal chinese.
For science it's more on reserch than studying of facts like what his peers are doing.
Then there are the additonal examinable subjects like social studies.

The GEP students are required to stay back once a week too for computer lessons that include microsoft office,webpage designing, chinese computing etc.

At least he has no problem of fitting into a new school like those students from other schools.


Hi ngdrdad,

So are you glad where he is now and what would be your main concern of this course, if any ? Do you have to help him with his project and homework?


We had a detail briefing by the teachers in charge of GEP in the school
They even have counsellor for GEP students who need emotional support.
More or less we know what to expect.
But the workload is quite heavy.
For the projects some parental help are needed definitely.

I have a younger son in P2 now and he is very keen to be in GEP as well but we think he will probably not make it thru the test. He is the type who cannot think outside the box but have very good memory.

The school has a uniques system called twinning whereby the top non GEP students join GEP students in the same class for half a day before recess.
After recess they will break into two GEP classes and 2 twinning classes.

The twinning classes learn quite a fair bit of GEP materials. I think my younger son is probably more suited for this than GEP.

ngbrdad
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 13, 2009 6:06 pm

ngbrdad wrote:
The school has a uniques system called twinning whereby the top non GEP students join GEP students in the same class for half a day before recess.
After recess they will break into two GEP classes and 2 twinning classes.

The twinning classes learn quite a fair bit of GEP materials. I think my younger son is probably more suited for this than GEP.


This sounds like an interesting idea, how long do they practise this twinning? 1 term, 2 terms or throughout the year? Are these learning activities included in their final exam or purely fun-based? Thanks for sharing.
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Postby ngbrdad » Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:31 pm

ks2me wrote:
ngbrdad wrote:
The school has a uniques system called twinning whereby the top non GEP students join GEP students in the same class for half a day before recess.
After recess they will break into two GEP classes and 2 twinning classes.

The twinning classes learn quite a fair bit of GEP materials. I think my younger son is probably more suited for this than GEP.


This sounds like an interesting idea, how long do they practise this twinning? 1 term, 2 terms or throughout the year? Are these learning activities included in their final exam or purely fun-based? Thanks for sharing.


Think they started the twinning programme for past one or two years.
It's for the duration of whole P4 to P6.
Top students who did well in the GEP screening but did not make the cut off are selected into twinning .
In the morning the class will do non GEP subjects like Chinese, music PE etc.
After recess, the 4 twinning classes break up to form two GEP and two twinning classes.
The twinning classes will take the same school tests/exams like the rest of theri peers but a lot of their learning materials are the same as GEP.

Just that they don't do as much research/projects, and maybe social studies not as detail as GEP students.

ngbrdad
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Postby ChiefKiasu » Fri Feb 13, 2009 7:49 pm

ks2me wrote:
ChiefKiasu wrote:That's a very good post. It echoes my feelings. But I thought it would have been more effective if the author's kid herself is not in the GEP class.


I know what you mean but if she does not have a kid in GEP, she runs the risk of being a sour grape. In any case, she does not have expectations of her second going into GEP, so she is 50% outside the fence and 50% inside...so there is still credibility.


It depends on the message. Her message is that parents should not send or prepare their kids for GEP. The kids either have it or they don't. So if her own kid is not in GEP, and she is not bothered by it, that would keep her message intact. But since her kid is in GEP, her argument comes across a little flat and patronizing. But that's just my opinion :)

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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 13, 2009 10:22 pm

ngbrdad wrote:Think they started the twinning programme for past one or two years.
It's for the duration of whole P4 to P6.
Top students who did well in the GEP screening but did not make the cut off are selected into twinning .
In the morning the class will do non GEP subjects like Chinese, music PE etc.
After recess, the 4 twinning classes break up to form two GEP and two twinning classes.
The twinning classes will take the same school tests/exams like the rest of theri peers but a lot of their learning materials are the same as GEP.

Just that they don't do as much research/projects, and maybe social studies not as detail as GEP students.


Thanks for the explanation. It is great to know that there are schools out there which bridge the learning process for their good students. The labelling is not important but more importantly, the bright kids, not up to GEP level at least get some exposure to similar learning process. Do you know if this twinning program is unique to this school only or applicable to most GEP schools?
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Postby Guest » Fri Feb 13, 2009 10:33 pm

ChiefKiasu wrote:
ks2me wrote:
ChiefKiasu wrote:That's a very good post. It echoes my feelings. But I thought it would have been more effective if the author's kid herself is not in the GEP class.


I know what you mean but if she does not have a kid in GEP, she runs the risk of being a sour grape. In any case, she does not have expectations of her second going into GEP, so she is 50% outside the fence and 50% inside...so there is still credibility.


It depends on the message. Her message is that parents should not send or prepare their kids for GEP. The kids either have it or they don't. So if her own kid is not in GEP, and she is not bothered by it, that would keep her message intact. But since her kid is in GEP, her argument comes across a little flat and patronizing. But that's just my opinion :)

Appreciate your opinion and I can understand the flavour you are looking at. I suppose the real test comes when the second child does not get into the programme.
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Postby aggellim » Fri Feb 13, 2009 11:44 pm

ks2me wrote:Thanks for the explanation. It is great to know that there are schools out there which bridge the learning process for their good students. The labelling is not important but more importantly, the bright kids, not up to GEP level at least get some exposure to similar learning process. Do you know if this twinning program is unique to this school only or applicable to most GEP schools?



Primary Gifted Education Programme (GEP) (Primary 4 to 6)
School Nature of School

Anglo-Chinese School (Primary) Boys
Catholic High School (Primary)* Boys
Henry Park Primary School Co-ed
Nan Hua Primary School* Co-ed
Nanyang Primary School* Co-ed
Raffles Girls' Primary School Girls
Rosyth School Co-ed
St Hilda's Primary School Co-ed
Tao Nan School* Co-ed

* Special Assistance Plan (SAP) Schools which offer only Chinese Language as Mother Tongue.

From 2008, all 9 primary GEP centres introduced initiatives to promote greater interaction between GEP and non-GEP pupils, allowing them to learn, work and play together on a daily basis.

The integration models proposed generally take one of 2 forms:

Integrated form classes comprising GEP and non-GEP pupils. The form class will have common lessons for all subjects except the school’s GEP core curriculum. GEP pupils attend separate classes for English Language, Mathematics and Science. This model is implemented in Nan Hua Primary School and Tao Nan School (BiCEP classes) for both Primary 4 and Primary 5 in 2008.

Separate form classes for GEP and non-GEP pupils. Pupils will be pulled out of their form class for combined lessons in Art and Crafts, Civics and Moral Education, Chinese Language / Higher Chinese, Music and Physical Education. This model is implemented in the other 7 centres for all Primary 4 classes in 2008.

All 9 schools will continue to provide enhanced opportunities for greater integration through schoolwide activities, CCAs and community involvement programmes. :celebrate:

HOpe this helps :welcome:

aggellim
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Postby Guest » Sat Feb 14, 2009 9:48 am

Yes it is helpful. Thank you aggellim :)
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