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GEP screening test? Go or no Go

Poll ended at Tue Aug 12, 2008 12:26 pm

Must Go
7
35%
Can Try
11
55%
Don't Go
2
10%
 
Total votes : 20

Postby 2ppaamm » Wed Jan 27, 2010 6:10 pm

sleepy wrote:Just side track a little.
Not all prodigies end up failure in life. There are in fact many more who are successful :wink:


An extract from Hoagies http://www.hoagiesgifted.org/grade_skipped.htm


So many times, only the negative examples of grade acceleration are remembered. For those who prefer a more positive outlook, here's a list of individuals who skipped one or more grades, and are successful in their fields... from professionals athletes to scientists to presidents to actors and actresses to Nobel Prize winners, and many, many more. There are far more positive examples than negative ones!
But there is no discernable pattern... grade skips occur in the U.S. and elsewhere, in early and late grades, in girls and boys. The only common factor is that all these individuals are both grade skipped and successful!

Neil Armstrong, astronaut, first man to walk on the Moon
Skipped mid-year from second to third grade. As as a 2nd grader, he was reading at a 5th grade level, so they moved him to third!

Warren Buffett, brilliant investor, world's first or second richest man, CEO of Berkshire Hathaway
Skipped once and graduated at 17.

Agree. Of course not all prodigies end up in failure. But not all grade skippers are prodigies either. Prodigies have a very different definition, as clearly explained by Mr Cawley in his blog.

Even Mozart struggled after he is no longer considered a prodigy. That's why I say child prodigy don't go very far. Once they are >10 years old, no longer considered a prodigy. They then have to work towards being a great musician/scientist/mathematician etc. That, is the test, but most prodigies don't go beyond being a prodigy.

Explains? :?

So, by some definition, Ainan was but is no longer a child prodigy. Now, where does he go from here as far as his father's branding goes?

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Postby sleepy » Wed Jan 27, 2010 6:30 pm

2ppaamm wrote:Agree. Of course not all prodigies end up in failure. But not all grade skippers are prodigies either.


Oh, does that mean they are just moderately gifted enough to skip grades :!:

2ppaamm wrote:Even Mozart struggled after he is no longer considered a prodigy. That's why I say child prodigy don't go very far. Once they are >10 years old, no longer considered a prodigy. They then have to work towards being a great musician/scientist/mathematician etc.


My understanding of giftedness:
Being gifted doesn't mean the child knows everything. It simply means he or she learns at a faster speed. So it still involves some effort

So for prodigy, no need to learn at all ?? Can play back a piece if he or she heard it once :!:
Did I get the differentiation right :?

2ppaamm wrote:That, is the test, but most prodigies don't go beyond being a prodigy.
Explains? :?


Do I seem like I get it? If not, please enlighten me further :wink:
This is an interesting topic :D

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Postby 2ppaamm » Wed Jan 27, 2010 7:13 pm

sleepy wrote:So for prodigy, no need to learn at all ?? Can play back a piece if he or she heard it once :!:

Yesterday my daughter told me that she has a classmate who could do just that. She never had a day of lesson, and she can replicate everything my daughter played with both hands! And it was a Mozart Sonata?!!! :!:

The only other person I know who could do that is Mozart. Who composed this same Sonata (16 pages long) in one seating in front of the audience. K309.

Maybe Singapore also got such geniuses, or is it my daughter who is exaggerating? :idea:

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Postby ngbrdad » Wed Jan 27, 2010 7:38 pm

Btw what the boy achieved was a pass grade in O level chemistry and subsequely O level physics and A level chemistry right ?
No exact grade wa revealed right ?

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Postby Blobbi » Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:44 pm

2ppaamm wrote:Yesterday my daughter told me that she has a classmate who could do just that. She never had a day of lesson, and she can replicate everything my daughter played with both hands! And it was a Mozart Sonata?!!! :!:



I had a college mate who could do that. He stopped learning the piano at a young age (disliked it), and then decided he loved it again. So he'd be in the student's mess playing on the piano. He was a really sweet guy who managed to woo quite a few gals because of his instant ability to replicate songs (with very complicated chords) he'd heard on the radio (he was 5 ft nothing :lol:). Anyway, he went off to Taiwan to marry his girlfriend and is probably a bigwig in the music industry now :D.

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Postby Blobbi » Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:44 pm

2ppaamm wrote:Yesterday my daughter told me that she has a classmate who could do just that. She never had a day of lesson, and she can replicate everything my daughter played with both hands! And it was a Mozart Sonata?!!! :!:



I had a college mate who could do that. He stopped learning the piano at a young age (disliked it), and then decided he loved it again. So he'd be in the student's mess playing on the piano. He was a really sweet guy who managed to woo quite a few gals because of his instant ability to replicate songs (with very complicated chords) he'd heard on the radio (he was 5 ft nothing :lol:). Anyway, he went off to Taiwan to marry his girlfriend and is probably a bigwig in the music industry now :D.

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Postby bcet0104 » Wed Jan 27, 2010 8:52 pm

2ppaamm wrote:
bcet0104 wrote:I have a son who is highly intelligent and quirky (I am not sure if he is qualified to be labeled gifted or not, but it doesnt really matter to us). There are times when we wonder if he has Aspergers. After numerous assessments, it was concluded that he is just the typical high IQ, low EQ child. He may pick up academic knowledge easily but he just can't handle "gray matter"... to him, the world functions solely on logic and everything is either "black or white".

Hi bcet0104,

Your kid sounds like mine. Just that mine is a confirmed case of AS. But hey, we can always take everything in a good perspective, and I do believe everything happens for a good reason.

Perhaps you can understand even better where I am coming from. Being gifted or intelligent is really no big deal. So what if one is the smartest person in the world, and without a friend.

Without social skills and EQ, any person will become irrelevant. What should we choose - intelligence or wisdom. For my kids, I will go for the latter - anytime. With wisdom, everything else will fall into place.


Yes, looks like we both share the same beliefs. Indeed, things do happen for a reason. We have learnt so much from him and till now we are still learning. He is more comfortable with books than with other children and it is heart breaking to see our child struggling with friendships. What is the use of knowledge when the others could not appreciate his ideas and start to alienate him? He's definitely one of the least popular kid in the class :(, but we are working hard to help him develop his social skills. It takes a lot of effort and time, but it's definitely worth the effort.

Given a choice, we would rather that he grow up with fond memories of his childhood, one filled with friendship, love and happy moments. Then again, not all is lost as we do see signs of improvement in his social skills.

It's great to know that there are other parents out there who shares the same thoughts :)

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Postby 2ppaamm » Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:22 pm

bcet0104 wrote:He is more comfortable with books than with other children and it is heart breaking to see our child struggling with friendships. What is the use of knowledge when the others could not appreciate his ideas and start to alienate him? He's definitely one of the least popular kid in the class :(, but we are working hard to help him develop his social skills. It takes a lot of effort and time, but it's definitely worth the effort.

Given a choice, we would rather that he grow up with fond memories of his childhood, one filled with friendship, love and happy moments. Then again, not all is lost as we do see signs of improvement in his social skills.

It's great to know that there are other parents out there who shares the same thoughts :)

How strange... that's exactly the position I am in leh. The GEP HOD told me that she has never met a case like mine ever since she started teaching GEP. She started when GEP started. :faint:

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Postby vlim » Wed Jan 27, 2010 10:53 pm

well some of the gifted kids are more mature as compare to other kids of their same age. So these gifted kids will see the later as childish and immature and subsequently avoid making friends with them. As they have higher iq, some or most of these gifted kids simply do not understand why the other children would do things in the 'stupid' way and why they could not understand a simple logic or problem which they think is 'easy' :idea: .... So maybe all the above reasons constitute to their behaviour problem or social skill problem. That is my analysis after 'studying' my ds behaviour but luckily he is not that bad...he is still able to make friends in class... :roll:

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Postby 2ppaamm » Wed Jan 27, 2010 11:04 pm

vlim wrote:well some of the gifted kids are more mature as compare to other kids of their same age. So these gifted kids will see the later as childish and immature and subsequently avoid making friends with them. As they have higher iq, some or most of these gifted kids simply do not understand why the other children would do things in the 'stupid' way and why they could not understand a simple logic or problem which they think is 'easy' :idea: .... So maybe all the above reasons constitute to their behaviour problem or social skill problem. That is my analysis after 'studying' my ds behaviour but luckily he is not that bad...he is still able to make friends in class... :roll:

Sigh! What's the point of having an IQ of a 17 year old and the social skills of a 4 year old? Having said that, there's so much we can learn from such imbalance and so much innocence behind that smart alec. Just waiting for the day the EQ matches the IQ, and I know that day will come, as long as we refuse to give up.

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