All About (Global) Development Delays

Discuss issues related to children who have special needs or learning difficulties
Post Reply
choute
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
Posts: 19
Joined: Mon Feb 23,

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by choute » Wed Sep 11, 2019 6:50 pm

lazysummerdayz wrote:
Sun Jul 14, 2019 10:20 am
choute wrote:
Sat Apr 13, 2019 12:15 pm
Dr at NUH advised us to do mri n genetic testing. Haven’t made up our mind. MRI need sedation, not sure if there is a risk, dd is 2 years n 3 month. As for genetics test, understand that even if can find something, in most of the cases, there is no cure, while may impact dd insurance plan.

Anyone have done it for the the child? Can share the experience please? Thanks.
Hi! We have done MRI and genetic testing for our son. MRI came back normal while genetic test came back positive. You are quite right abt the impact to insurance, we cldnt get insurance coverage (not even hospitalisation plan). Think it is best to consult friends who are agents and settle the insurance first b4 gg for the test.

You are also right that currently there is no cure for genetic disorders. But the test result somewhat provided a closure, in terms of confirming what was the exact issue, as we had spent months in the dark not knowing what was wrong with our son and how we cld help him. With more clarity on his genetic disorder, we have a better idea of the prognosis and what to expect, and we managed to get in touch with support group (families with kids having same genetic disorder) to access more resources. Hope this helps!
Thanks for the sharing.

Ella455
GreenBelt
GreenBelt
Posts: 150
Joined: Thu Mar 08,
Total Likes:1

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by Ella455 » Fri Sep 13, 2019 9:36 am

Hi, Choute!
I understand how you feel and I know that it is hard to deal with your son's condition. I am wondering if how do you cope up with the challenges. How do you handle the stressful days of worrying for him?

dollyrac
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Apr 30,

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by dollyrac » Mon Mar 02, 2020 6:27 am

Hi everyone, have a gdd girl diagnosed at 18mths. She is 2014 baby n suppose to go p1 nxt year but we will be defering her but nuh cdu dr told us to send her to sped sch instead. Since diagnosing, she has been in full day cc pcf n eipic intervention n pte st for a year plus n pte ot before we moved her to st gerard doing in hoyse ot, st, sch readiness program. She is also starting lessons in das n epworth. Sad to say she is still unable to close up the gaps although she is improving. Speech still unclear but able to write her name although not very well. Is there a group chat for gdd mummies please n i m keen to know if we defer her for a year n push her to mainstream, what are the support u will be giving your child? Appreciate if you can email me to share your experience please. Dollyrac@gmail.com

We have depleted our savings to help my child and really appreciate parents with similar experience can share how to help my girl cope in mainstream since nuh cdu dr said she scored below average for sch readiness n encourage us to send to sped instead of mainstream pri.

slmkhoo
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 11963
Joined: Wed Sep 15,
Total Likes:245

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by slmkhoo » Mon Mar 02, 2020 10:10 am

I don't have a child with GDD; my daughter is high-functioning ASD (Asperger's). She has always been in mainstream school, but it has already been quite a struggle for her, and she has needed a lot of support. If your child is not as able, she (and you) will find it much harder. Schools do not have the capacity to give your child the individual attention she will need, and teachers cannot teach to your child's level because the rest of the class will need to be taught at their level, and it would not be fair to them or the teacher to hold them back. There is also the risk of bullying if your child is significantly different from the others.

You have already realised that closing the gap is difficult, and I would say from my experience that it is impossible within the normal timeframe. I'm not saying that your child will never be able to close the gap, but she is unlikely to close the gap by the time she is 7 or 8. My daughter has kept up academically with her age group, but has needed a lot of support, less in academic skills now, but a lot in social and other skills, and is still lagging behind. We realise that she may never totally "catch up" - she is already in her 20s.

If your daughter attends sped, she will be taught at her level, which is really the best way to learn. She will not be able to learn as well in a mainstream classroom if the level is too high compared to what she needs. I do agree that giving her the chance to be exposed to mainstream students is good, but full-time mainstram school is probably not the best solution as it sub-optimises for her learning. Maybe you can find other opportunities for exposure along the way.

madiba
KiasuNewbie
KiasuNewbie
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Mar 04,

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by madiba » Thu Mar 05, 2020 9:47 pm

Dear parents,

Big news from the U.S. for those who would are struggling with understanding the behaviours of their children with special needs, and how to manage them, and teach their children.

The Autism Partnership Foundation, a U.S. based and world-leading service provider (they have an office here in Singapore) for individuals with ASD and related disorders (GDD included) has launched a FREE 40 hour training in Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA) for anyone interested.

This 40 hour training covers the task list of a Registered Behaviour Technician, a professional certification in ABA issued by the Behaviour Analyst Certification Board (BACB). This is the level of training that qualifies one to be a front line staff working with individuals with ASD and related disorders. You read that right. And it's free.
*Note that the 40 hour training is only one component to apply for certification.*

Detailed information can be found at: https://autismpartnershipfoundation.org/courses/rbt/

ABA is the gold standard treatment approach for ASD and related disorders, with a strong evidence base for its effectiveness. You can read more about it at: https://www.autismspeaks.org/applied-be ... ysis-aba-0

Note that you would need to register an account with the BACB beforehand as you will need to produce your BACB ID to sign up for the course. The account is free to register and takes less than 5 mins. You can do so at https://www.bacb.com/

I hope that this is welcome news for some of you parents out there. Cheers!


Kjolene
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Jan 28,

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by Kjolene » Fri Apr 24, 2020 10:38 am

My boy is 15 months old and not really walking yet as well. So far he managed about 2 or 3 steps by himself at the most. How can I encourage him to walk more?

Kjolene
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Jan 28,

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by Kjolene » Fri Apr 24, 2020 10:42 am

When do I need to be seek help for my son who is not really walking? He is 15 months now.

zac's mum
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 4133
Joined: Tue Jan 03,
Total Likes:163

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by zac's mum » Fri Apr 24, 2020 11:12 am

The guideline used by paediatricians is 18 months.

Is he generally weak in motor development? You say he doesn’t walk much, but does he Eg crawl around a lot rather than walking? Or is he generally reluctant to move around to reach his toys?

Kjolene
OrangeBelt
OrangeBelt
Posts: 67
Joined: Tue Jan 28,

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by Kjolene » Mon Apr 27, 2020 11:05 pm

He is crawling a lot and cruising as well. He is generally very active and moves around a lot.

zac's mum
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
Posts: 4133
Joined: Tue Jan 03,
Total Likes:163

Re: All About (Global) Development Delays

Post by zac's mum » Tue Apr 28, 2020 7:11 am

That is a good sign then! For reference, my friend whose child who was not walking yet at 18 months, had very weak legs with no strength in them. Generally inactive & reluctant to even crawl. Only had arm strength (ie upper body). Upon PD check after 18m, turned out to have cerebral palsy.

Your boy sounds fine cos he’s cruising a lot. To entice him to let go of the cruising support & walk more than 2-3 steps each time, try this: sit a distance away from him, hold out a favorite toy (or favorite food!) *just* beyond his reach. Use your voice to encourage him to grab the object. He will start to release the support & walk more steps towards you.

Praise praise praise his efforts to walk! And sneakily increase the distance heehee.

Generally parents with girls will hold their hands to “help” them walk (build leg muscle strength). Girls prefer the human connection. But generally boys (mine too) didn’t want to hold my hand. He preferred having a “challenge” that he could strive to reach for, on his own. That made him feel more “in control”.

Hope this helps!

Post Reply