All About Autism

Discuss issues related to children who have special needs or learning difficulties
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slmkhoo
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Re: All About Autism

Post by slmkhoo » Thu Feb 12, 2015 8:56 pm

Gifts from Heaven wrote:
slmkhoo wrote:
Gifts from Heaven wrote:Actually, mine also don't have a consolidated IQ score cos of his disability on the social aspect affecting his VIQ scores. According to my psychologist, the variation of the PIQ and VIQ scores must fall within some limits (ie the standard deviation) for them to calculate the consolidated IQ. We were told to just take the PIQ score as his max potential. And if we are not comfortable, we can just take the average of PIQ and VIQ.
Sorry, what do the P and V stand for?
Oops! :smile:

P = processing
V = verbal
Sounds like a different test from what my daughter was given. Her results were in 4 categories - 2 were something-or-other reasoning, working memory, and processing speed. Her reasoning scores were OK, but she was low in the others.

Autumnleaf
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Re: All About Autism

Post by Autumnleaf » Fri Feb 13, 2015 2:07 am

Slmkhoo and Gifts from Heaven, thank you for sharing some suggestions and experiences. Been getting calls from DS maths teacher again... Constant fiddling with stationary ><! We are trying to talk some sense into our 10 yr old DS lately, reserve the caning for times when he had been warned and it happens again despite of warning.

P4s are expected to use pen now but I don't think mine is ready!!! He really has horrendous handwriting. But even with wooden 2b pencils... He could come back with the lead tips missing.

For the IQ test he just did, if I recall correctly some of the areas tested are verbal compre, visual spatial, processing speed, working memory....

I am not sure how my DS1 profile will look..quite curious. So far physcoligist had only noted that some attention deficit is noticed while his memory is on the high side.

Are any of your children left handed?
So far my DS1, DD and Hb are lefties. Still to find out on DS2. I read lefties may be prone to learning disabilities....

slmkhoo
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Re: All About Autism

Post by slmkhoo » Fri Feb 13, 2015 7:41 am

Autumnleaf wrote:Slmkhoo and Gifts from Heaven, thank you for sharing some suggestions and experiences. Been getting calls from DS maths teacher again... Constant fiddling with stationary ><! We are trying to talk some sense into our 10 yr old DS lately, reserve the caning for times when he had been warned and it happens again despite of warning.

P4s are expected to use pen now but I don't think mine is ready!!! He really has horrendous handwriting. But even with wooden 2b pencils... He could come back with the lead tips missing.
...

Are any of your children left handed?
So far my DS1, DD and Hb are lefties. Still to find out on DS2. I read lefties may be prone to learning disabilities....
Handwriting - when my daughter was P3, we decided it was time to put in some focused effort on handwriting. Up till then, her fine motor skills seemed too weak and it would have been too frustrating. What I did was get her to write lines of letters (like in kindy), about 10 mins a day, focusing on staying on the line and forming the letters properly. Then we progressed to common pairs of letters (based on what I could see as problems in her written work), then whole sentences. We stopped before her hand got too tired because that would just mean she was practising writing badly. After a few mths, she could stay on the line, and her writing was legible. That was good enough for me. I told her teachers what I was doing at home and they were patient enough to wait. I had to make her practise drawing lines with a ruler too!

Maybe 2B pencils are too soft? Try HB if you can find them here. If you find he presses too hard (my daughter had this problem), a good tip I read was to get them to practise writing with a mousepad under the paper. They learn to control the pressure because if they press too hard, they tear the paper.

Does he know how to sharpen pencils? But that may be a distraction too. I had the problem of my daughter allowing her classmate to "sharpen" her pencils for her - until they were stumps after just 1 day! I had to teach her how to say "no" to this girl.

Fiddling - try to enforce the habit of "nothing except the necessary" on the desk while he's working at home, and build up the habit that this is the way to work. Hopefully he will then do the same in school. Perhaps you can put a note in his pencil case to remind him, or ask his teachers to remind him as well. I found that telling and scolding for action the next day didn't work well as spoken words are promptly forgotten. Teaching by making her do what I expected and building habits was what worked best. And by showing her that working the way I taught her gave her more free time in the end, it ingrained the habit eventually. I believe this is what ABA does.

Some kids (and adults) find fiddling or doodling helps them concentrate. Is this the case for your son? Or does he distract himself? If it helps him concentrate, maybe try to find a solution acceptable to both him and the teachers? Some small item that doesn't make noise and distract others.

My Aspie daughter is very right-handed, but my NT daughter is left-handed.

Gifts from Heaven
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Re: All About Autism

Post by Gifts from Heaven » Fri Feb 13, 2015 8:16 am

Fiddling with stationery is quite a common problem with kids, NT or otherwise. slmkhoo has given u a great suggestion abt pasting a note in your kid's pencil case to remind him not to play with stationery. This is also the suggestion given when I attended a talk on preparing ASD kids for mainstream primary school.

About writing with pen...you can get those pen with erasable ink, so if the handwriting gets too messy, can erase off. These pens are good for beginner pen users for daily work. But I think they cannot be used for exam purposes. Those pens are my gal's favourites (she's also P4 this year, so some of the issues you face with your boy is common to mine as well). Think it's called pilot clickable flixion or something like that. It has a little transparent rubberised stub at the top. Costs $3 a piece and can buy the pen refill at $1.50.

The IQ test that my boy received was geared for kids up to 7 years old. He was diagnosed at 5. So your kids would have done a different set of IQ test since they are older.

My boy is righted-handed but I'm left-handed. Don't think I have any learning disability though :lol: .

slmkhoo,
I read with interest abt the writing training you gave to your elder gal. My boy also writes too hard, but his handwriting is really really v nice, like print...v precise. The thing abt using too much strength to write is he tires out v easily. I see it as a problem cos as he gets older and progresses up the levels, there will be more writing to do. So I'll probably try the mouse pad training, but what happens if the paper tears? Wouldn't your gal cry? I know mine will...and it would probably escalate into a meltdown if I don't fix the tear to the condition he wants it immediately.

slmkhoo
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Re: All About Autism

Post by slmkhoo » Fri Feb 13, 2015 8:53 am

Gifts from Heaven wrote:slmkhoo,
I read with interest abt the writing training you gave to your elder gal. My boy also writes too hard, but his handwriting is really really v nice, like print...v precise. The thing abt using too much strength to write is he tires out v easily. I see it as a problem cos as he gets older and progresses up the levels, there will be more writing to do. So I'll probably try the mouse pad training, but what happens if the paper tears? Wouldn't your gal cry? I know mine will...and it would probably escalate into a meltdown if I don't fix the tear to the condition he wants it immediately.
Don't use schoolbooks or anything too precious initially. In fact, to prevent meltdowns, use paper that doesn't matter, like the back of printed sheets etc. Tell him that it's just practice, that you expect the paper will tear initially, and that you will throw the papers away anyway. If the paper tears, start another line or give him a new sheet. Challenge him to see how much he can write before the paper tears. Just do short things at first - letters, words, phrases, so that if he moves on to a new sheet, there's nothing "lost". Once he gets the hang of it on paper that doesn't matter, he will hopefully transfer the skill to his proper work.

Getting tired when writing is a problem, but their stamina will increase with age too. My daughter still doesn't write very long essays (at 18yo, doing Arts A level subjects!), but I don't know if it's because she finds it tiring or because she can't think of enough to write. I have considered asking for her to be allowed to use a computer for the essay papers, but I'm still undecided as I'm not sure that it would help her write more, and being alone in a room to do exams may be worse as she may start day-dreaming! And I don't know if it would be allowed anyway. She doesn't take A levels till next year, so I have another year to see how things go.


slmkhoo
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Re: All About Autism

Post by slmkhoo » Fri Feb 13, 2015 10:57 am

Gifts from Heaven wrote:Fiddling with stationery is quite a common problem with kids, NT or otherwise. slmkhoo has given u a great suggestion abt pasting a note in your kid's pencil case to remind him not to play with stationery. This is also the suggestion given when I attended a talk on preparing ASD kids for mainstream primary school.
I used this technique (writing reminders) quite a lot as I found that my daughter absorbed info via the written word much better than the spoken word. I recall reading that many ASD kids are like that? In the early years, since my daughter could read by 4yo, I posted lists and reminders all over the place whenever I was trying to teach her a sequence of activities or when getting her not to forget stuff. Lists for: brushing teeth, washing hair, packing bags, getting ready for homework, upon waking up, before going to bed... My mother used to laugh at me when she visited, but it really saved my breath in nagging (I only had to say "read the list!") and I think it helped her learn better too. We used a few social stories too. When she started school, her school made them keep a homework journal where all homework, deadlines, reminders etc was written down, and she has continued to do that to this day. I do it myself as well! It's not foolproof, but it does help.

Autumnleaf
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Re: All About Autism

Post by Autumnleaf » Sat Feb 14, 2015 9:49 am

Slmkhoo, yes that sounds like my son.. Learns better reading then by his ears. I have to re-look pocket money issues with him... As the fiddling with "new" stationaries is one big problem. He goes to school with minimum but will buy from the bookshop even though he's been smacked, and even had his whole week allowance taken back as an punishment for breaking our rule (ask before buying anything from bookshop).

Was hoping to impart money skills hence since term 3 last year we have him weekly allowance rather then daily. Either way though the problem persists and when he buys the new stationary which usually is a pen, he has trouble resisting his compulsion to "play" with the new pen, till he just last week flunked his class test (thankfully this one is not weighted). He did the first page, and left the second totally blank! Teacher called me to inform me he's playing with stationery.

Gifts from Heaven, my son does have problems with handwriting pressure too. He's though is too light! So the pen kinda helps. Marking his work is a headache... Either too faint to read, too small and mostly very messy!

As and when I find it too messy, we usually will make him re-do, but Its still quite messy. Me and the teachers learned to accept it, but as long as it's readable. My 6 yr DS hand writing is neater already then DS1 since she started K2.... So know he struggles with hand writing. Would be so cool if they could type out their compos etc!

DesertWind
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Re: All About Autism

Post by DesertWind » Sat Feb 14, 2015 6:51 pm

phtthp wrote:Desert wind,
it is good to hear that your son has eased into Term 1, well.
Term 1 is "honeymoon" period, to let kids settle down. Whether can ditch this $ 2k per month Shadow Tr or not - the Form Tr will feedback to you at end of Term 2 (after half a year evaluation).
Hi phtthp,
Told the school we are prepared to commit for 6 months only and each day only 3 hours. :moneyflies: :moneyflies: :moneyflies: lah! Its like paying money to gather more information on how boy is doing and iron out any kinks early in the school year. Long-term wise it is not viable to have a full-time shadow teacher. Meanwhile, I am taking the shadow teacher's feedback and working on it. For eg. a visual schedule time-table to run through with boy each day etc. One thing the shadow teacher shared which struck me is the class is very, very noisy. She also got a headache and she pitied the teachers. When the teacher shout to get the kids to quieten down, apparently my boy got a shock and will cover his ears and whine. Seems like a war-zone each day....jia lat! :faint:

DesertWind
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Re: All About Autism

Post by DesertWind » Sat Feb 14, 2015 7:07 pm

tyeogh wrote: Hi DesertWind,
I told my wife about you and your son. She told me to talk to you more. Alamak! :slapshead: She was inspired by your sharing.
... I have had so many favourable reports from people who worked with him so I just put him back at his age appropriate level, and let our boss figure the rest. The same teacher who downgraded him recommended the upgrade. Its her principal that objected mainly because she has no slots. We received a call recently from his current K2 form teacher saying that he is doing fine in class. Told us not to worry.
OIC, that's really amazing, bro. Even I find it so hard to understand but its really good news! :imcool:
Please thank your wife for me and may you both have a very Happy Valentine's Day!
:celebrate:

DesertWind
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Re: All About Autism

Post by DesertWind » Sat Feb 14, 2015 7:14 pm

Couragemom wrote:Hi Dessertwind,
Thanks for sharing! All victories both big and small are celebrated by us all as we know they don't come easy and the tons of blood and tears to get our little ones to where they are now is no small feat! I believe it is the only thread where we can safely 'brag' about our little one and nobody will think we are those 'cannot lose' type of parents! Hahaha....
Hi Couragemom,
Yes, if we are deemed to be boasting, it's often only because we are happy that our kids have reached the baseline which other kids achieve so easily and effortlessly. So can't be called bragging or kiasu actually! But we are just mere human being, so sometimes we still compare with other special needs kids... :roll:

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