question about maths problem sum

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question about maths problem sum

Postby happyandhealthy » Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:53 pm

hi mommies I need to clarify something about this maths problem. Eg there are 5 baskets and in each basket there are 5 eggs. how many eggs are there altogether.
My question is, when u write the number sentence, is there any difference writing between 5x8=40? and 8x5=40?

Thanks in advance

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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby verykiasu2010 » Mon Feb 13, 2012 1:55 pm

happyandhealthy wrote:hi mommies I need to clarify something about this maths problem. Eg there are 5 baskets and in each basket there are 5 eggs. how many eggs are there altogether.
My question is, when u write the number sentence, is there any difference writing between 5x8=40? and 8x5=40?

Thanks in advance


your question is 5 baskets x 5 eggs leh
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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby sunnydays2 » Tue Feb 14, 2012 3:08 am

5X5=25

Anyway, don't think there's any difference between 5X8 and 8X5.

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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby Guest » Tue Feb 14, 2012 6:35 am

Assuming you mean 5 baskets and each has 8 eggs.

This is 5 groups of 8 = 5 x 8

8 x 5 is 8 groups of 5.

Mathematically, the commutative law states that:
5 x 8 = 8 x 5.

However, when children are learning concepts of multiplication, the teacher will teach them to understand 5 groups of 8 is 5 x 8 and 8 groups of 5 is 8 x 5, hence at that learning stage, the child has to note the difference according to English. I suppose this is teaching the child how to interpret the Math from an English statement so following the English specifically is required at this stage of learning. As they move up and understand the commutative property in Math for multiplication, then both can be used interchangeably as they solve problems.

If I am not wrong, at P2 when this is learnt, there are worksheets to ask the children to write what is 6 groups of 8 and they have to put as 6 x 8 and not 8 x 6
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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby verykiasu2010 » Tue Feb 14, 2012 8:37 am

ksi wrote:Assuming you mean 5 baskets and each has 8 eggs.

This is 5 groups of 8 = 5 x 8

8 x 5 is 8 groups of 5.

Mathematically, the commutative law states that:
5 x 8 = 8 x 5.

However, when children are learning concepts of multiplication, the teacher will teach them to understand 5 groups of 8 is 5 x 8 and 8 groups of 5 is 8 x 5, hence at that learning stage, the child has to note the difference according to English. I suppose this is teaching the child how to interpret the Math from an English statement so following the English specifically is required at this stage of learning. As they move up and understand the commutative property in Math for multiplication, then both can be used interchangeably as they solve problems.

If I am not wrong, at P2 when this is learnt, there are worksheets to ask the children to write what is 6 groups of 8 and they have to put as 6 x 8 and not 8 x 6


hence the emphasis that good english is needed for good math scores
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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby happyandhealthy » Tue Feb 14, 2012 11:27 am

sorry for typo error. it shd be like what ksi assumed. 5 baskets, 8 eggs. thanks for pointing out.

hi ksi thanks for your detailed explanation. I can now understand. I used to tell my son there's no difference between the 2 number sentence as you get the same answer ultimately. guess I have to be more careful.
thanks again for your great help.
:smile:

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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby Guest » Tue Feb 14, 2012 2:16 pm

verykiasu2010 wrote:
ksi wrote:Assuming you mean 5 baskets and each has 8 eggs.

This is 5 groups of 8 = 5 x 8

8 x 5 is 8 groups of 5.

Mathematically, the commutative law states that:
5 x 8 = 8 x 5.

However, when children are learning concepts of multiplication, the teacher will teach them to understand 5 groups of 8 is 5 x 8 and 8 groups of 5 is 8 x 5, hence at that learning stage, the child has to note the difference according to English. I suppose this is teaching the child how to interpret the Math from an English statement so following the English specifically is required at this stage of learning. As they move up and understand the commutative property in Math for multiplication, then both can be used interchangeably as they solve problems.

If I am not wrong, at P2 when this is learnt, there are worksheets to ask the children to write what is 6 groups of 8 and they have to put as 6 x 8 and not 8 x 6


hence the emphasis that good english is needed for good math scores


True to say that you need to have knowledge of English to interpret the Math question written in English into mathematical symbols to be solved. This training is mainly required for PROBLEM SUMS.
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Re: question about maths problem sum

Postby Guest » Tue Feb 14, 2012 2:25 pm

happyandhealthy wrote:sorry for typo error. it shd be like what ksi assumed. 5 baskets, 8 eggs. thanks for pointing out.

hi ksi thanks for your detailed explanation. I can now understand. I used to tell my son there's no difference between the 2 number sentence as you get the same answer ultimately. guess I have to be more careful.
thanks again for your great help.
:smile:


You are welcome happyandhealthy. :)

This is where our kids learn the exam-paper smart part if a child is already very smart in knowing the commutative law or for advanced kids.

If it is a worksheet or topical test or the year they are being tested for the learning concepts of x groups of y, then they have to be careful which one comes first. After bypassing that stage, it is fine. In other words, come PSLE, this would no longer be an issue.
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