Find Tuition/Enrichment Centres

All About English Creative Writing

Discussions on tuition centres/enrichment services that specialise in English.

Postby Jennifer » Wed Oct 15, 2008 9:27 pm

jedamum wrote:Hi Jennifer,
Thanks for sharing.
Any reason why you did not stick to one particular creative writing centre?
Yes, the course fees can be quite hefty...sufficient to buy plenty of books for self-reading.


Timing is the deciding factor. The older boy was in afternoon session in P1 (ICR has Sat class, weekdays too rush), then P2 morning session (switched to Jan & Elly afternoon class as Jan & Elly is nearer our place, jsut a few bus tops away), then P3 afternoon session (Morris Allen Sat class, ICR @ Serene Centre has closed down plus we wanted to try the Gifted Prog preparation class).

I think most centres teach the same stuff-grammer, vocabulary n ideas generation. It all boils down to timing n fees n locations. And the teacher rapport with the students.

Jennifer
KiasuGrandMaster
KiasuGrandMaster
 
Posts: 25944
Joined: Fri Sep 05, 2008 1:10 pm
Total Likes: 121


Postby JH » Thu Oct 16, 2008 6:39 pm

Jennifer wrote:My older boy went through a series of creative writing course-P1 @ I Can Read Advanced Exams and Writing Skills, P2 @ Jan & Elly creative writing, P3 @ Morris Allen English enrichment and end of P3 @ Catherine Khoo's Experiments.

But when I asked him if these helped, his answer is I dunno know. We do not know how to explain for his flair for writing, these courses or his daily reading?

This year, my younger boy was introduced to the 4W and 1H by the sch teacher -When, Where, Who, What and How. But there is so few practices, so far less than 10 compo and some are dictated works, yet this SA2 is testing them on compo :roll:

I am now deciding between spending money and time on 3rd party enrichments or just loading him with reading at home.


Yes Jennifer, I had the same experience. My boy was introduced to the 4W and 1H in school too. And yes, less than 10 compo was done in school and I am prepared that the results might not turn out good. I am also thinking, to send him to a Creative Writing class or make him read and write more. I saw a software My Home Tutor at Popular which teaches creative writing and others. Maybe could help a little......?

JH
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Oct 14, 2008 3:32 pm
Total Likes: 0


Postby ck123 » Fri Oct 17, 2008 11:24 am

Hi Chief,

Can you help to give summary of the list of english enrichment centres? (Like those that you have done for the chinese enrichment)

Thanks, your effort is appreciated so that we parents can have a clear picture.

ck123
GreenBelt
GreenBelt
 
Posts: 108
Joined: Wed Jul 16, 2008 2:14 pm
Total Likes: 0


creative writing classes

Postby mwchua » Sat Oct 25, 2008 2:03 pm

hi all,

Would like to seek advice on English creative writing classes. Any good centres to recommend ?

Thanks.

Rgds,
Ming

mwchua
BrownBelt
BrownBelt
 
Posts: 609
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 5:36 pm
Total Likes: 2


Re: creative writing classes

Postby ChiefKiasu » Sat Oct 25, 2008 3:14 pm

mwchua wrote:...Would like to seek advice on English creative writing classes. Any good centres to recommend ?...


[Moderator's note: Topics merged.]

ChiefKiasu
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15611
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:16 am
Location: Singapore
Total Likes: 329



Postby usaik » Sat Nov 01, 2008 4:32 am

What is creative writing? There seems to be a lot of enrichment centres offering creative writing. Are schools these days looking for creative writing in the student's work?

I have a P1 boy who is currently attending I Can Read Advanced Exams and Writing Skills. I really don't see much advance exam and writing skills being taught but I do see a lot of creativity in his writing in his ICR classes. He has lots of funs in class and the teacher encourages a lot of creativity.

So far he has only done a few compo in his P sch...and...I somewhat incline to think that his school teacher in school would be looking for standard stuffs, down to earth and the not so much creative stuffs.

Can anyone here share with me your experience on what the school looks for? Creativity?

usaik
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 6:27 am
Total Likes: 0


Postby ChiefKiasu » Sun Nov 02, 2008 1:07 am

usaik wrote:What is creative writing?...


Thanks usaik, you brought up an excellent point. Essentially, we tend to equate creative writing to Primary School COMPOSITION. This leads to confusion and disillusion when the child's results come in at the end of the year.

Key goals of Primary School composition
- Grammar
- Spelling
- Sentence construction
- Organization and semantics
- Correct use of words/idioms

Key goals of creative writing:
- Captivating
- Captivating
- And did I say... captivating?

Essentially, you can write the most boring story for Primary school and get top marks as long as your grammar and sentence construction is pristine. Conversely, a Pulitzer prize article/story may not necessarily ace a Primary school English exam.

Of course, a good creative writer will generally have as pre-requisites the necessary skills of a good composition writer. But the focus is really on the ability to open up the mind to create something out of nothing.

ChiefKiasu
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15611
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:16 am
Location: Singapore
Total Likes: 329


Postby usaik » Sun Nov 02, 2008 4:36 am

Thanks for sharing the difference b/w creative writing and what school 's actually look out for.

I agree that a good creative writer will generally have as pre-requisites the necessary skills of a good composition writer. However, I personally feel that it is a huge challenge to "enrich" a child to attain the objective of the goal for a Primary school composition without comprising and stifling the creativity of a young beginner writer.

Any tips to share on how to teach a child to constantly stick to the goals of the P Sch composition when his ideas and thoughts are running 2 thousand miles ahead WITHOUT killing the fun and the joy in creative writing.

usaik
BlueBelt
BlueBelt
 
Posts: 260
Joined: Sat Jul 19, 2008 6:27 am
Total Likes: 0


Postby ChiefKiasu » Sun Nov 02, 2008 8:32 am

usaik wrote:...I agree that a good creative writer will generally have as pre-requisites the necessary skills of a good composition writer. However, I personally feel that it is a huge challenge to "enrich" a child to attain the objective of the goal for a Primary school composition without comprising and stifling the creativity of a young beginner writer.

Any tips to share on how to teach a child to constantly stick to the goals of the P Sch composition when his ideas and thoughts are running 2 thousand miles ahead WITHOUT killing the fun and the joy in creative writing.


You are right. In fact, one of the cardinal rules of stimulating creative writing in children is NOT to nitpick on spelling and grammar, but focus on how well the idea is developed. Our children's interest in writing drop to zero when their compositions comes back in a sea of red-ink.

The child must be rewarded for creativity first, and delivery second. And delivery is really the part where we can help the child improve on grammar and semantics, which are necessary for primary school.

1. NEVER criticize the child's ideas in his/her writing. At the first reading, praise generously regardless of how outlandish or fantastic the story appears to you. But remain authentic, and don't go overboard if you really dislike the story.

2. Subsequently, challenge the child to rewrite the story, not so much as to improve grammar and spelling, but to improve the impact of the story on the readers. It is not a "your spelling/grammar sucks, so do corrections" session. Rather, it can be something like: "That's a great story, and I've got some tips for you to make it more exciting and readable. Here's how you can make this sentence more enjoyable... and here's how you can organize the story to make it more coherent..."

Primary schools generally are a lot less on creative writing, and much more on report writing. Early levels do "picture compositions", in which children are to extract and describe the story from a sequence of pictures. So there is lesser opportunity to be creative, and since the framework is already given, lesser chance for children to try out different ways of organizing their stories for greater impact. That's exactly how journalists are trained to write.

ChiefKiasu
Site Admin
 
Posts: 15611
Joined: Mon Sep 03, 2007 9:16 am
Location: Singapore
Total Likes: 329


Postby ngchris » Sun Nov 02, 2008 2:04 pm

I remembered hating composition when I was younger 'cos it's comething that I cannot relate to. Don't think it matters if it's given a better name called "creative writing" :D

What I did recently (so far working) is to blend it with his interest. For instance, he loves to compose with musical notes (produce pieces which doesn't make sense really). So I told him to think of a story and build his music on his piece of story. So he wrote a story on a stormy night and "compose" a fast piece of loud music piece symbolising a stormy night. Praises and appreciation of his own composed music is where he gets his motivation for his next piece of work. Didn't force him to do that everyday as he needs his inspiration too :lol:

So if your kid likes to draw, get hhim/her to write a stroy about it and share. That might work too. Good luck.

ngchris
YellowBelt
YellowBelt
 
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jun 21, 2008 1:52 pm
Total Likes: 0


PreviousNext

Return to English

Find Tuition/Enrichment Centres