All About Overseas Education

Is there life after O/A-Levels? Definitely! How well a person does in tertiary education is correlated with job opportunities open to the person. Discuss issues pertaining to nstitutes of higher learning here.
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Joy
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Joy » Sat Mar 31, 2018 12:46 pm

pinky wrote:Do look out for educational exhibitions by the various international universities from Uk, US, Australia etc.The representatives will answer any queries n and give you brochures to go through.

thank you!

Ms Tan
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Ms Tan » Tue May 15, 2018 8:44 pm

Hi. Is there any parents whose child was/is/will be studying physiotherapy in Australia?

Would appreciate if you can share which Australia Uni is your child in and what were your considerations which led to that chosen Uni.

Thank you in advance.

Terryy
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Terryy » Tue May 15, 2018 9:27 pm

Ms Tan wrote:Hi. Is there any parents whose child was/is/will be studying physiotherapy in Australia?

Would appreciate if you can share which Australia Uni is your child in and what were your considerations which led to that chosen Uni.

Thank you in advance.
Have you considered the local course at SIT? I recently had a friend's son who enrolled in there. Not too sure on the details but if you need I can help ask.

Ms Tan
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Ms Tan » Tue May 15, 2018 9:36 pm

Yes, SIT has been considered. Currently evaluating overseas uni option. Thanks!

Jennifer
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Jennifer » Wed Sep 05, 2018 10:27 am

My child has received the hall of residence confirmation.
We see that the resident is supposed to bring along basic cooking utensils.

What do you deem as basic cooking utensils?
On the Facilities website, the assigned kitchen is said to be equipped with cupboard, shared refrigerator, cookers, microwaves, toasters and kettles. Does it mean there is no cooking pots, spatula?


slmkhoo
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by slmkhoo » Wed Sep 05, 2018 12:29 pm

Jennifer wrote:My child has received the hall of residence confirmation.
We see that the resident is supposed to bring along basic cooking utensils.

What do you deem as basic cooking utensils?
On the Facilities website, the assigned kitchen is said to be equipped with cupboard, shared refrigerator, cookers, microwaves, toasters and kettles. Does it mean there is no cooking pots, spatula?
They won't provide utensils, plates, pots, knives, boards etc unless they say so. Depending on the hall policy, sometimes there may be some stuff left behind by previous students, and new students can "inherit" them. Some halls may clear everything so there won't be anything there. My suggestion is to go there and see before buying. Seniors may also have stuff accumulated from graduating students which can be passed to freshers. The only thing you may want to get in advance is a small rice cooker as I think the ones on sale in the UK tend to be quite big and expensive.

In the UK, there is a catalogue shop called Argos (Google for it) which is usually quite cheap, and supermarkets may sell the basics too. There may be other local places which also sell basic stuff, and your son can ask seniors for recommendations. If you don't mind used stuff, charity shops usually have a lot of misc. kitchen and dining stuff. To start with, I would advise students to eat the food provided (if they have a meal plan) as that's a good way to meet people, and also gives them a bit of time to settle in and buy stuff. Then buy the bare essentials first, and add gradually as needed. Your son may decide he doesn't really like to cook (like my husband) and so won't need much - my husband (then boyfriend) probably managed with a couple of mugs, a plate, fork and spoon and not much else! He only needed more the year he shared a flat. He mostly ate the provided food or take-aways, and I would feed him once a week.

.zeit
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by .zeit » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:11 pm

There were used teflon-coated pasta pots, omelette frying pans & wooden spatulas provided, but can't remember if they replenished with new sets yearly. There should be a drip coffee-maker too. It's best to get your own as some might be hogged by other residents during peak hours when they have gatherings or parties.

If you need a mini rice cooker or slow cooker, you can look out for campus garage sales or simply go to Chinatown / Argos / Dixons / online Chinese importers or traders to buy. There are a lot of free hand-me-downs from other Asian seniors. Email hall to check if kitchen's got an induction stove before getting a Chinese wok.

It's good to buy him a personal electric kettle or airpot to be placed inside his room. NB: Email hall to check if kettle/coffee makers are permissible. They were allowed in the UK halls last time, so I set up a mini bar in my room.

If you really want, you can start shipping to his hall this month. Surface mail took about 8 weeks to arrive then. But since you are flying over, you can go shopping with him for:

Microwavable plate, bowl, mug, & thermos flask
Cutlery
Tupperware boxes, ziplock bags
Spatula, ladle, can-opener, peeler, knife set
Chopping board (they had one, but not clean to me)

I think after the students hv started populating their kitchens, he will find out if he can share/borrow some items like dishwashing detergent, aluminium foil, cling film, baking tray, seive, rolling pin, cleaver...

If there are female students from Asia sharing that same kitchen@same floor, he will be very lucky.

If he is not a fussy eater, he can buy sandwiches or bentos from Tesco to microwave. Men usually cook pasta. They can eat that for the whole week. They don't spend a lot of time in the kitchen.

Jennifer
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Jennifer » Wed Sep 05, 2018 1:36 pm

slmkhoo, .zeit,

:thankyou: for the information.

the hall of residence specifically prohibits cooking devices, toasters, kettles in the bedroom, by order of the College Fire Officer.

There is a website https://www.unikitout.com/ ,with prices listed in SGD, which elder boy is looking at now.
I think he should check in the hall first, then see what cooking utensils he should get or share among the residents of the assigned kitchen.

btw the hall is self-catered, no meals provided.

.zeit
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by .zeit » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:31 pm

Troublesome to walk out to the kitchen to boil water to refill my thermos in winter. Besides, the common kettle had some lime deposits.

I needed to drink kopi/tea/hot chocolate every day. I also drink a lot of boiled water. UK tap water is too hard for me.

Jennifer
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Re: All About Overseas Education

Post by Jennifer » Wed Sep 05, 2018 2:45 pm

slmkhoo,

:thankyou: for pointing out Argos.

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